Minersville Park

Minersville Park was an American football stadium in Minersville, Pennsylvania, near Pottsville. This field was located where the current Kings Village Plaza is located on Route 901 in Minersville. It is most notable as the home field for the Pottsville Maroons football team from 1920 to 1928, including during their run in the National Football League from 1925 to 1928. It was a high school stadium, and had a capacity of only 5,000, relatively low for other NFL stadiums at the time.[2][3] When the Maroons moved to Boston as the 1929 (only) Bulldogs, they played two games in greater Pottsville: October 27 at Minersville Park (v. Buffalo Bisons) and October 29 at Mitchell Field (v. Newark Tornadoes).[4]

Minersville Park
LocationMinersville, Pennsylvania
OwnerMinersville, Pennsylvania
OperatorPottsville Maroons
Capacity5,000[1] (American football)
SurfaceGrass
Tenants
Pottsville Eleven (Ind.) (1920–23)
Pottsville Maroons (AL) (1924)
Pottsville Maroons (NFL) (1925–1928)

References

  1. ^ http://explorepahistory.com/hmarker.php?markerId=1012
  2. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-12-18. Retrieved 2011-03-28.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-02-15. Retrieved 2006-10-04.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ The Pro Football Archives (http://www.profootballarchives.com/1929nflbos.html)

Coordinates: 40°43′06″N 76°20′56″W / 40.71824°N 76.34880°W

1922 Pottsville Maroons season

The 1922 Pottsville Maroons season was their 3rd season in existence. The team played independently and would go on to post a 4–4–2 record.

1923 Pottsville Maroons season

The 1923 Pottsville Maroons season was their 4th season in existence. The team played independently would go on to post a 7-3-2 record.

1924 Pottsville Maroons season

The 1924 Pottsville Maroons season was their 5th season in existence. The team played in the Anthracite League would go on to post a 12-1-1 record and claim the League Championship. The team would play in the National Football League the following year.

1925 Chicago Cardinals–Milwaukee Badgers scandal

The 1925 Chicago Cardinals–Milwaukee Badgers scandal was a scandal centered on a 1925 game between the Chicago Cardinals and the Milwaukee Badgers of the National Football League. The scandal involved a Chicago player, Art Folz, hiring a group of high school football players to play for the Milwaukee Badgers, against the Cardinals. This would ensure an inferior opponent for Chicago. The game was used to help prop up their win-loss percentage and as a chance of wresting the 1925 Championship away from the first place Pottsville Maroons.

1925 NFL Championship controversy

The 1925 National Football League Championship, claimed by the Chicago Cardinals, has long been the subject of controversy. The controversy centers on the suspension of the Pottsville Maroons by NFL commissioner Joseph Carr, which prevented them from taking the title.

The Maroons were one of the dominant teams of the 1925 season, and after defeating the Chicago Cardinals on December 6, came away with the best record in the league. However, Carr suspended and removed the team from the NFL after they played an unauthorized exhibition game in Philadelphia, on the grounds that they had violated the territorial rights of the Frankford Yellow Jackets. Chicago played and won two more games against weak NFL opponents, but were sanctioned because a Chicago player, Art Folz, hired four Chicago high school football players to play for the Milwaukee Badgers under assumed names to ensure a Cardinals victory.

Pottsville supporters argue that the suspension was illegitimate because the League did not then grant exclusive territory rights and that, in any event, they had verbal League approval to play the game in Philadelphia. Further, they argue that the Maroons, who were reinstated the next year, would have had the best record had they not been suspended. Others claim that Chicago were the legitimate champions based on the rules of the time. In 1963, the NFL investigated and rejected Pottsville's case, and in 2003 refused to reopen the case. Both the NFL and the Pro Football Hall of Fame continue to list the Cardinals as the 1925 NFL champion.

1925 Pottsville Maroons season

The 1925 Pottsville Maroons season was their inaugural season in the National Football League. The team finished a 10–2 league record and a 13–2 overall record. The team initially won the 1925 NFL championship, however a controversial suspension cost them the title, forcing the team to finish in second place.

1926 Pottsville Maroons season

The 1926 Pottsville Maroons season was their second in the National Football League. The team matched their previous league record of 10–2, They finished third in the league standings.The Maroons established an NFL record for most shutout wins or ties in a season, with 11 in "official" league games.

1927 New York Giants season

The 1927 New York Giants season was the franchise's 3rd season in the National Football League, and first under head coach Earl Potteiger. The Giants suffered their only loss and sole tie to the Cleveland Bulldogs. They were ranked first in yards allowed, yards gained, and points allowed, and were second in points scored. Over the entire season, the Giants scored 197 points and allowed 20. The team was led in scoring by fullback Jack McBride who scored 57 points, with six rushing touchdowns, two field goals, and 15 extra points. They then lost an exhibition game on December 26, 1927, in Oklahoma to Otto and Ira Hamilton's Hominy Indians (all Native American team), 13–6 (Documentary: Playground of the Native Son).

1927 Pottsville Maroons season

The 1927 Pottsville Maroons season was their third in the league. The team failed to improve on their previous league output of 10–2–2, winning only five games. They finished eighth in the league standings.

1928 Pottsville Maroons season

The 1928 Pottsville Maroons season was their fourth in the league and their last before changing their name to the Boston Bulldogs. The team failed to improve on their previous league output of 5–8, winning only two games. They finished eighth in the league.

1929 Boston Bulldogs season

The 1929 Boston Bulldogs season was their fifth and final season in the league and their only season after changing their name from the Pottsville Maroons. The team improved on their previous output of 2–8, winning four games. They finished fourth in the league.Based at Braves Field, the Bulldogs nonetheless hosted their two-game swan song back in their old stomping grounds, defeating both the Buffalo Bison on October 27 at Minersville Park and the Newark Tornadoes on October 29 at Pottsville's Mitchell Field.

Johnny "Blood" McNally

John Victor McNally (November 27, 1903 – November 28, 1985), nicknamed Johnny Blood, was an American football player and coach. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1963.

Minersville, Pennsylvania

Minersville is a borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, United States, located four miles (6 km) west of Pottsville. Anthracite coal deposits are plentiful in the region. The population was 4,552 at the 2000 census.

Orange/Newark Tornadoes

The Orange Tornadoes and Newark Tornadoes were two manifestations of a long-lived professional American football franchise that existed in some form from 1887 to 1941 and from 1958 to 1970, having played in the National Football League from 1929 to 1930, the American Association from 1936 to 1941, the Atlantic Coast Football League from 1963 to 1964 and 1970, and the Continental Football League from 1965 to 1969. The team was based for most of its history in Orange, New Jersey, with many of its later years in Newark. Its last five seasons of existence were as the Orlando Panthers, when the team was based in Orlando, Florida. The NFL franchise was sold back to the league in October 1930. The team had four head coaches in its two years in the NFL – Jack Depler in Orange, and Jack Fish, Al McGall and Andy Salata in Newark.

Pottsville, Pennsylvania

Pottsville is a city in, and the county seat of, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 14,324 at the 2010 census, and is the principal city of the Pottsville, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area. The city lies along the west bank of the Schuylkill River, 52 miles (84 km) south of Wilkes-Barre. It is located in Pennsylvania's Coal Region.

Pottsville Maroons

The Pottsville Maroons were an American football team based in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, in the Northeastern part of the state. Founded in 1920, they played in the National Football League (NFL) from 1925 to 1928. In 1929 they relocated to Boston, where they played one season as the Boston Bulldogs.

The team was founded as the Pottsville Eleven, an independent team playing in the local eastern Pennsylvania circuit. Home games were played at Minersville Park, a high school stadium in nearby Minersville. They joined the local Anthracite League in 1924, the same year they adopted the "Maroons" nickname, and won the league title. The next season they joined the NFL under owner John G. Streigel. Though dominant on the field, a controversial suspension cost them the 1925 NFL Championship. They were reinstated the following year, but after two successive losing seasons in 1927 and 1928, Streigel sold the Maroons to a group in Boston, where they played one season before folding.1925 was their best season. The 1928 roster included three future Pro Football Hall of Fame members – Johnny "Blood" McNally, Walt Kiesling, and coach Wilbur "Pete" Henry – but posted the worst record in franchise history. Writer John O'Hara, who would go on to become a world-famous novelist with Appointment in Samarra, covered the team for the local newspaper, the Pottsville Republican.

Pottsville Maroons – Boston Bulldogs
The Franchise
Stadiums
Culture
Lore
Head Coaches
NFL Championships (0)
Anthracite League Championships (1)
Defunct stadiums of the National Football League
Early era:
19201940
Merger era:
19411970
Current era:
1971–present
Stadiums
used by
NFL teams
temporarily

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