Milt Gantenbein

Milton Edward Gantenbein (May 31, 1910 – December 18, 1988) was an American football player who played on three championship teams, as an end and as a defensive end for the Green Bay Packers from 1931 to 1940.

The former University of Wisconsin–Madison standout was a member of three National Football League (NFL) championship teams under head coach Curly Lambeau. In 1931, his rookie year, the sure-handed Gantenbein was the perfect complement to deep-threat Laverne Dilweg in Lambeau's pass-oriented offense and was a solid addition at defensive end. Green Bay's defense limited opponents to 87 points and had five shutouts, while the Packer offense compiled 291 points in fashioning a 12-2 record and winning a third league championship title in the 1931 NFL season. Gantenbein continued as a two-way starter for the next three seasons, playing in the shadow of Dilweg and John McNally.

In the 1936 NFL season, Don Hutson and Gantenbein were the main targets in the Packers' record-setting passing attack, with 34 and 15 catches respectively. The duo was also instrumental in Green Bay's 21-6 victory over the Boston Redskins in the 1936 NFL Championship Game . Gantenbein iced the game with an 8-yard touchdown reception from Arnie Herber in the third quarter.

Gantenbein was named a team captain for the 1937 squad, and he again was a stalwart in the defensive line and the team's second leading receiver with 12 catches for 237 yards (19.8 yard average) and two touchdowns. In the 1937 NFL season, Green Bay slipped to 7–4. In the 1938 NFL season, the team had an 8-3 record and made it to the 1938 NFL Championship Game, where the Packers lost 23–17 to the Giants in New York.

In the 1939 NFL season, the Green Bay Packers struggled at times but posted a 9–2 record to gain a rematch with the New York Giants for the league title in the 1939 NFL Championship Game. This time the game was played on Wisconsin soil, and Gantenbein opened the scoring with a 7-yard touchdown reception from Arnie Herber. It would be all the points the Packers needed on a cold and windy afternoon at Wisconsin State Fair Park in Milwaukee, as they crushed the Giants, 27–0.

He was inducted into the Packers Hall of Fame in 1972 and finished his career with three NFL championships, 77 receptions, 1,299 yards and eight touchdowns. Milt played in 103 regular-season games as a Packer.

With his playing days behind him, Gantenbein went on to coach football at Manhattan College in New York for several years.

Milt Gantenbein
No. 22
Position:End / Defensive end
Personal information
Born:May 31, 1910
New Albin, Iowa
Died:December 18, 1988 (aged 78)
Carmichael, California
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:199 lb (90 kg)
Career information
High school:La Crosse (WI)
College:Wisconsin
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR
1929 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1929 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams chosen by various selectors for the 1929 Big Ten Conference football season.

1930 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1930 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1930 Big Ten Conference football season. The team compiled a 6–2–1 record (2–2–1 against conference opponents), finished in a tie for fourth place in the Big Ten Conference, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 227 to 40. Glenn Thistlethwaite was in his fourth year as Wisconsin's head coach.Tackle Milo Lubratovich was a consensus first-team player on both the 1930 College Football All-America Team and the 1930 All-Big Ten Conference football team. Guard Greg Kabat was selected by the Associated Press (AP) as a first-team player on the All-Big Ten team, and end Milt Gantenbein was selected by the AP, UP, and NEA as a second-team All-Big Ten player.Halfback Ernie Lusby was selected as the team's most valuable player. Gantenbein was the team captain.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium, which had a capacity of 38,293. During the 1930 season, the average attendance at home games was 18,175.

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1937 All-Pro Team

The 1937 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1937 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the International News Service (INS), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Four players were selected for the first team by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Green Bay Packers fullback Clarke Hinkle; Washington Redskins tackle Turk Edwards; and Chicago Bears guard George Musso. Three others were named to the first team by four selectors: Washington Redskins Sammy Baugh (NFL, INS, UP, NYDN; selected as a halfback); Chicago Cardinals end Gaynell Tinsley (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN); and Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN). Three more were selected by three selectors: Washington Redskins halfback Cliff Battles (NFL, INS, NYDN); Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson (INS, CE, NYDN); and New York Giants center Mel Hein (NFL, INS, NYDN).

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