Military ranks of Turkmenistan

The Military ranks of Turkmenistan are the military insignia used by the Armed Forces of Turkmenistan. Being a former Soviet state, Turkmenistan shares a rank structure similar to that of Russia.

Commissioned officers

The rank insignia for commissioned officers for the army, navy and air force respectively.

Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer
Turkmenistan Turkmenistan
(Edit)
No equivalent Turkmenistan-Army-OF-9.svg Post-Soviet-Army-OF-8.svg Post-Soviet-Army-OF-7.svg Post-Soviet-Army-OF-6.svg Post-Soviet-Army-OF-5.svg Post-Soviet-Army-OF-4.svg Post-Soviet-Army-OF-3.svg Post-Soviet-Army-OF-2.svg Post-Soviet-Army-OF-1c.svg Post-Soviet-Army-OF-1b.svg Post-Soviet-Army-OF-1a.svg Post-Soviet-Army-OF-(D).svg
General armii General-polkovnik General-leýtenant General-maýor Polkovnik Podpolkovnik Maýor Kapitan Uly leýtenant Leýtenant Kiçi leýtenant Harby talyp
Turkmenistan Turkmenistan
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No equivalent
Russia-Navy-OF-8-1994-everyday.svg Russia-Navy-OF-7-1994-everyday.svg Russia-Navy-OF-6-1994-everyday.svg Russia-Navy-OF-5-1994-everyday.svg Russia-Navy-OF-4-1994-everyday.svg Russia-Navy-OF-3-1994-everyday.svg Russia-Navy-OF-2-1994-everyday.svg Russia-Navy-OF-1c-1994-everyday.svg Russia-Navy-OF-1b-1994-everyday.svg Russia-Navy-OF-1a-1994-everyday.svg Unknown
Admiral Vice Admiral Counter admiral Captain 1st rank Captain 2nd rank Captain 3rd rank Captain Lieutenant Senior lieutenant Lieutenant Junior lieutenant
Turkmenistan Turkmenistan
(Edit)
No equivalent
18.Turkmenistan Air Force-CG.svg 17.Turkmenistan Air Force-LG.svg 16.Turkmenistan Air Force-MG.svg 15.Turkmenistan Air Force-COL.svg 14.Turkmenistan Air Force-LTC.svg 13.Turkmenistan Air Force-MAJ.svg 12.Turkmenistan Air Force-CAPT.svg 11.Turkmenistan Air Force-SLT.svg 10.Turkmenistan Air Force-LT.svg 09.Turkmenistan Air Force-JLT.svg Unknown
Colonel General Lieutenant General Major General Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain Senior Lieutenant Lieutenant Junior Lieutenant
Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer

Enlisted

The rank insignia for enlisted personnel for the army, navy and air force respectively.

Equivalent
NATO code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1
Turkmenistan Turkmenistan
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None.svg None.svg None.svg None.svg None.svg None.svg None.svg No equivalent
None.svg
No equivalent No equivalent Starşina Uly seržant Seržant Kiçi seržant No equivalent Hatarçy
Turkmenistan Turkmenistan
(Edit)
08.Turkmenistan Air Force-MWO.svg 07.Turkmenistan Air Force-WO.svg 06.Turkmenistan Air Force-MSG.svg 05.Turkmenistan Air Force-SSGT.svg 04.Turkmenistan Air Force-SGT.svg 03.Turkmenistan Air Force-JSGT.svg 02.Turkmenistan Air Force-CPL.svg No equivalent
01.Turkmenistan Air Force-PV.svg
Senior warrant officer Warrant officer Starshina Senior sergeant Sergeant Junior sergeant Gefreiter Private
Equivalent
NATO Code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1

References

Armed Forces of Turkmenistan

The Armed Forces of the Republic of Turkmenistan (Turkmen: Türkmenistanyň Respublikasy Ýaragly Güýçleri, Түркменистаның Республикасы Яраглы Гүйчлери) is the national military of Turkmenistan, consisting of the Army, Air Force and Air Defense Forces, Navy, Border Troops, Internal Troops and a National Guard. After the fall of the Soviet Union, significant elements of the Soviet Armed Forces Turkestan Military District remained on Turkmen soil, including several motor rifle divisions. In June 1992, the new Russian government signed a bilateral defence treaty with Turkmenistan, encouraging the new Turkmen government to create its own armed forces but stipulating that they were to be placed under joint command.The Library of Congress Country Studies said that 'the Treaty on Joint Measures signed by Russia and Turkmenistan in July 1992 provided for the Russian Federation to act as guarantor of Turkmenistan's security and made former Soviet army units in the republic the basis of the new national armed forces. The treaty stipulated that, apart from border troops and air force and air defense units remaining under Russian control, the entire armed forces would be under joint command, which would gradually devolve to exclusive command by Turkmenistan over a period of ten years. For a transitional period of five years, Russia would provide logistical support and pay Turkmenistan for the right to maintain special installations, while Turkmenistan would bear the costs of housing, utilities, and administration.'

The Centre for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies's Moscow Defence Brief said that '..[i]n 1992-1993 Turkmenistan attempted to create a small national armed force based on the former 52nd Army (Soviet Union), which was located in the country and depended on support from Russia. Of the 300 formations and units, numbering 110,000 people, 200 were transferred to the command of Turkmenistan, 70 remained under Russia's jurisdiction, and 30 were either withdrawn or demobilized.

In 1994, the chief of staff and first deputy minister of defense was Major General Annamurat Soltanov, a career officer who had served in Cuba and Afghanistan; another deputy minister of defense, Major General Begdzhan Niyazov, had been a law enforcement administrator prior to his appointment. Russian commanders included Major General Viktor Zavarzin, chief of staff and first deputy commander of the Separate Combined-Arms Army of Turkmenistan, and commander of the Separate Combined-Arms Army of Turkmenistan and deputy minister of defense Lieutenant General Nikolai Kormiltsev. Russian Major General Vladislav Shunevich served together with Turkmen Major General Akmurad Kabulov as joint commanders of the border troops in the Turkmen Border Guard.

Turkmenistan consistently has refused to join multilateral CIS military groupings, but Russia maintains joint command of the three motorized rifle divisions in the Turkmenistani army. Under a 1993 bilateral military cooperation treaty, some 2,000 Russian officers serve in Turkmenistan on contract, and border forces (about 5,000 in 1995) are under joint Russian and Turkmenistani command. Altogether, about 11,000 Russian troops remained in Turkmenistan in mid-1996.' From V.I. Feskov et al. 2013 and Michael Holm's data, it appears that the three divisions were the 58th, 88th, and 209th District Training Centre (former 61 Training MRD) at Ashkhabad.Jane's Information Group said in 2009 that "Turkmenistan's military is, even by the standards of Central Asia, poorly maintained and funded."

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