Military ranks of Serbia


This is a list of military ranks used by the Serbian Armed Forces. Although a landlocked country, Serbia maintains a river flotilla (small river navy) of about 15 vessels on the Danube river.

Current ranks

Commissioned officers

The rank insignia for commissioned officers for the army, River Flotilla and air force respectively.

Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer
Serbia Serbia
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No equivalent 18-Serbian Army-GEN.svg 17-Serbian Army-LG.svg 16-Serbian Army-MG.svg 15-Serbian Army-BG.svg 14-Serbian Army-COL.svg 13-Serbian Army-LTC.svg 12-Serbian Army-MAJ.svg 11-Serbian Army-CPT.svg 10-Serbian Army-LT.svg 09-Serbian Army-SLT.svg Unknown
General
(Генерал)
Lieutenant General
(Генерал-Потпуковник)
Major General
(Генерал-Мајор)
Brigadier General
(Бригадни Генерал)
Colonel
(Пуковник)
Lieutenant Colonel
(Потпуковник)
Major
(Мајор)
Captain
(Капетан)
Lieutenant
(Поручник)
Second Lieutenant
(Потпоручник)
Serbia Serbia
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No equivalent 18-Serbian Navy-ADM.svg 17-Serbian Navy-VADM.svg 16-Serbian Navy-RADM.svg 15-Serbian Navy-CDRE.svg 14-Serbian Navy-CAPT.svg 13-Serbian Navy-CDR.svg 12-Serbian Navy-LCDR.svg 11-Serbian Navy-LT.svg 10-Serbian Navy-LTJG.svg 09-Serbian Navy-ENS.svg Unknown
Admiral
Адмирал
Vice admiral
Вице Адмирал
Counter admiral
Контра Адмирал
Commodore
Комодор
Captain
Капетан Бојног Брода
Commander
Капетан Фрегате
Lieutenant commander
Капетан Корвете
Lieutenant
Поручник Фрегате
Lieutenant junior grade
Поручник Корвете
Ensign
Потпоручник
Serbia Serbia
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No equivalent 18-Serbian Air Force-GEN.svg 17-Serbian Air Force-LG.svg 16-Serbian Air Force-MG.svg 15-Serbian Air Force-BG.svg 14-Serbian Air Force-COL.svg 13-Serbian Air Force-LTC.svg 12-Serbian Air Force-MAJ.svg 11-Serbian Air Force-CPT.svg 10-Serbian Air Force-LT.svg 09-Serbian Air Force-SLT.svg Unknown
General
(Генерал)
Lieutenant General
(Генерал-Потпуковник)
Major General
(Генерал-Мајор)
Brigadier General
(Бригадни Генерал)
Colonel
(Пуковник)
Lieutenant Colonel
(Потпуковник)
Major
(Мајор)
Captain
(Капетан)
Lieutenant
(Поручник)
Second Lieutenant
(Потпоручник)
Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer

Enlisted

The rank insignia for enlisted personnel for the army, River Flotilla and air force respectively.

Equivalent
NATO code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1
Serbia Serbia
(Edit)
08-Serbian Army-WO1.svg 07-Serbian Army-WO2.svg 06-Serbian Army-SSFC.svg 05-Serbian Army-SSG.svg 04-Serbian Army-SGT.svg 03-Serbian Army-JSG.svg 02-Serbian Army-CPL.svg 01-Serbian Army-PVT.svg No insignia
Warrant officer 1st class
(Заставник I класе)
Warrant officer
(Заставник)
Senior sergeant 1st class
(Старији Водник I класе)
Senior Sergeant
(Старији Водник)
Sergeant
(Водник)
Corporal
(Млађи водник)
Lance Corporal
(Десетар)
Private first class
(Разводник)
Private
(Војник)
Serbia Serbia
(Edit)
08-Serbian Navy-WO1.svg 07-Serbian Navy-WO2.svg 06-Serbian Navy-SSFC.svg 05-Serbian Navy-SSG.svg 04-Serbian Navy-SGT.svg 03-Serbian Navy-JSG.svg 02-Serbian Navy-CPL.svg 01-Serbian Navy-PVT.svg No insignia
Ensign, 1st class
(Заставник I класе)
Ensign
(Заставник)
Senior chief petty officer
(Старији Водник I класе)
Chief petty officer
(Старији Водник)
Petty officer
(Водник)
Master seaman
(Млађи водник)
Leading seaman
(Десетар)
Able seaman
(Разводник)
Seaman recruit
(Војник)
Serbia Serbia
(Edit)
08-Serbian Air Force-WO1.svg 07-Serbian Air Force-WO2.svg 06-Serbian Air Force-SSFC.svg 05-Serbian Air Force-SSG.svg 04-Serbian Air Force-SGT.svg 03-Serbian Air Force-JSG.svg 02-Serbian Air Force-CPL.svg 01-Serbian Air Force-PVT.svg No insignia
Warrant officer 1st class
(Заставник I класе)
Warrant officer
(Заставник)
Senior sergeant 1st class
(Старији Водник I класе)
Senior Sergeant
(Старији Водник)
Sergeant
(Водник)
Corporal
(Млађи водник)
Senior airman
(Десетар)
Airman first class
(Разводник)
Airman basic
(Војник)
Equivalent
NATO Code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1

Historical ranks

SrpskiKraljevskiCinovi
Structure of the Military ranks of Kingdom of Serbia (until 1918)
OF-10 Bojni Vojvoda 1923-1941 (Kings Insignia)
King of Yugoslavia special Vojvoda (Serbia and Yugoslavia) insignia with dynasty coat of arms and royal monogram

Generals

There were only three ranks in pre-World War I Serbia: General (from 1872), Army General (from 1900 to 1901) and Vojvoda (from 1901). Four ranks were introduced in Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes in 1923, and lasted until 1945. There were only two types of shoulder cords: with doubleheaded eagle and coat of arms of Kingdom of SHS or Kingdom of Yugoslavia for Vojvoda and without for all other General ranks. The different general grades were indicated by 6-pointed stars on the cuffs. Also the backing cloth for the shoulder cords was light blue for army general (was honorary rank in period from 1900-1901) and divisional generals and in a colour of service for brigadier general. During the Middle Ages, the Vojvoda was a military commander rank and a noble titule. In the Balkan Wars and World War I this title was used to designate the highest military rank in Serbian Army and later Royal Yugoslav Army (above the General - as equalent of Field Marshal in other armies). This rank was introduced by the law on the Organization of the Army Kingdom of Serbia in 1901. It has been awarded only during the war for: special merits of top generals. The first Vojvoda was promoted by the Great military decree of the Kingdom of Serbia on 20 October 1912. Only four people ever officially held that military rank: Radomir Putnik (got it in 1912), Stepa Stepanović (1914), Živojin Mišić (1914) and Petar Bojović (1918). Honorary title but not military rank held only French General Louis Franchet d'Espérey (1921). After unification of Kingdom of Serbia in to Kingdom SHS (later Kingdom Yugoslavia) no further officers where promoted to rank of Vojvoda. King of Yugoslavia held the rank of Supreme Commander and wear special Vojvoda uniform.

Ranks for SHS and Yugoslavia

Flag officer ranks

Ranks Vojvoda Army general Divisional General Brigadier General
Epaulette SrpskiCinovi18.PNG OF-9, OF-8 Armijski djeneral 1918–1945.png OF-7 Divizijski djeneral 1918-1945.PNG OF-6 Brigadni djeneral 1918-1945.PNG
Rank flag Flag of rank of Marshal of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia Standard of Army General of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia Standard of Division General of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia Standard of Brigade General of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia
Ranks in Serbian Војвода
Vojvoda
Армијски ђенерал
Armijski đeneral
Дивизијски ђенерал
Divizijski đeneral
Бригадни ђенерал
Brigadni đeneral

Officers

Ranks Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain, 1st class Captain, 2nd class Lieutenant Sub-Lieutenant
Epaulette OF-5 Pukovnik 1908-1945.PNG OF-4 Potpukovnik 1908-1945.PNG OF-3 Major 1908-1945.PNG OF-2A Kapetan I klase 1908-1945.PNG OF-2B Kapetan II klase 1908-1945.PNG OF-1A Poručnik 1908-1945.PNG OF-1B Potporučnik 1908-1945.PNG
Ranks in Serbian Пуковник
Pukovnik
Потпуковник
Potpukovnik
Мајор
Major
Капетан I класе
Kapetan I klase
Капетан II класе
Kapetan II klase
Поручник
Poručnik
Потпоручник
Potporučnik

Soldiers and NCOs

Ranks Sergeant-Major, 1st class Sergeant-Major, 2nd class Sergeant-Major, 3rd class Sergeant Junior Sergeant Corporal Private
Epaulette OR-8 Narednik-Vodnik I klase 1908-1945.PNG OR-7 Narednik-Vodnik II klase 1908-1945.PNG OR-6 Narednik-Vodnik III klase 1908-1945.png OR-4 Narednik 1908-1945.PNG OR-3 Podnarednik 1908-1945.PNG OR-2 Kaplar 1908-1945.PNG OR-1 Redov 1908-1945.png
Ranks in Serbian Наредник-Водник I класе
Narednik-Vodnik I klase
Наредник-Водник II класе
Narednik-Vodnik II klase
Наредник-Водник III класе
Narednik-Vodnik III klase
Наредник
Narednik
Поднаредник
Podnarednik
Каплар
Kaplar
Редов
Redov

External links

Army general (Kingdom of Yugoslavia)

Army general (Serbian: Armijski đeneral) was a military rank of the Kingdom of Serbia and later Kingdom of Yugoslavia. Established in 1886, it was abolished for some period after 1901, but it was again created in Kingdom of Yugoslavia after 1918 as Kingdom of Serbia passed along insignia and military ranks to newly named state. It was a high rank for Yugoslav generals, inferior only to the Vojvoda. Yugoslav army generals commanded armies, group of armies and held position of Deputy Commander in Chief of the Yugoslav Armed Forces, Chief of the Royal Yugoslav Army Air Force and Chief of the General Staff of the Royal Yugoslav Army. It was adopted and based on the similar French Army general.

Equipment of the Serbian Armed Forces

This is a list of equipment used by the Serbian Armed Forces.

Fregattenleutnant

Fregattenleutnant (Hun: Fregatthadnagy / en: translation Fregate lieutenant) was an officer rank in the Austro-Hungarian Navy. It was equivalent to Oberleutnant of the Austro-Hungarian Army, as well to Oberleutnant zur See of the Imperial German Navy. Pertaining to the modern day's NATO rank code it could be comparable to OF-1a (senior).

The right to be assigned to Fregattenleutnant was limited to professional officers. It was superior to Korvettenleutnant (a reserve rank) and inferior to Linienschiffsleutnant. Until 1908 the rank was called Linienschiffsfähnrich (ship-of-the-line ensign).

Professional officers skipped that rank Fregattenleutnant and were regular promote from Seefähnrich to Fregattenleutnant (also OF-1a), the next higher rank (comparable to Oberleutnant zur See).

The rank name was selected in line to the division of war ships to specific ship categories early of the 19th century, e.g. corvette (de: Korvette), frigate (de: Fregatte), and to ship of the line (de: Linienschiff). In the Austro-Hungarian Navy the appropriate rank designations were derived as follows.

Korvettenkapitän OF-3 (equivalent: to Heer Major)

Fregattenkapitän OF-4 (equivalent: to Heer Oberstleutnant)

Linienschiffskapitän OF5; (equivalent: to deutsche Marine Kapitän zur See / Heer Oberst)According to that systematic the rank designations to subaltern – or junior officers were derived as follows:

Korvettenleutnant OF-1b (equivalent to deutsche Marine Leutnant zur See Heer: Leutnant)

Fregattenleutnant OF-1a (equivalent to deutsche Marine Oberleutnant zur See / Heer: Oberleutnant)

Linienschiffsleutnant OF-2 (equivalent to deutsche Marine Kapitänleutnant / Heer:Hauptmann)This sequence of ranks can be found in the today´s Croatian naval forces.

Harambaša

Harambaša (Serbian Cyrillic: Харамбаша)was the rank for the senior commander of a hajduk band (brigand gangs).

History of the Serbian Army

The history of the Serbian Army dates back to the early 19th century, and includes the following periods:

Revolutionary Serbian Army (1804–17)

Armed forces of the Principality of Serbia (1830–82)

Royal Serbian Army (1882–1918)

Royal Yugoslav Army (1918–41)

Yugoslav People's Army (1945–91)

Armed Forces of Serbia and Montenegro (1992–2006)

Serbian Armed Forces (2006–)

Korvettenleutnant

Korvettenleutnant (Hun: Tengerészzászlós / en: translation Corvette lieutenant) was an officer rank in the Austro-Hungarian Navy. It was equivalent to Leutnant of the Austro-Hungarian Army, as well to Leutnant zur See of the Imperial German Navy. Pertaining to the modern day's NATO rank code it could be comparable to OF-1b.

The right to be promoted to Korvettenleutnant was limited to so-called naval reserve officers only. However, professional officers skipped that rank and were regular promote from Seefähnrich to Fregattenleutnant (also OF-1a), the next higher rank (comparable to Oberleutnant zur See). A Korvettenleutnant did wear the same rank insignia as a Seefähnrich.

The rank name was selected in line to the division of war ships to specific ship categories early of the 19th century, e.g. corvette (de: Korvette), frigate (de: Fregatte), and to ship of the line (de: Linienschiff). In the Austro-Hungarian Navy the appropriate rank designations were derived as follows.

Korvettenkapitän OF-3 (equivalent: to Heer Major)

Fregattenkapitän OF-4 (equivalent: to Heer Oberstleutnant)

Linienschiffskapitän OF5; (equivalent: to deutsche Marine Kapitän zur See / Heer Oberst)According to that systematic the rank designations to subaltern – or junior officers were derived as follows:

Korvettenleutnant OF-1b (equivalent to deutsche Marine Leutnant zur See Heer: Leutnant)

Fregattenleutnant OF-1a (equivalent to deutsche Marine Oberleutnant zur See / Heer: Oberleutnant)

Linienschiffsleutnant OF-2 (equivalent to deutsche Marine Kapitänleutnant / Heer:Hauptmann)This sequence of ranks can be found in the today´s Croatian naval forces.

Lieutenant colonel general

Lieutenant colonel general or sub-colonel general (Serbo-Croat: генерал-потпуковник or general-potpukovnik) is a general officer rank in a number of Balkan armed forces. Its literal meaning is "sub-colonel general".

The rank of lieutenant colonel general represents a rationalisation of the situation in some armies of a lieutenant general outranking a major general, when a major outranks a lieutenant. In the Serbian Army, the rank of "sub-colonel" (potpukovnik / потпуковник) is used rather than "lieutenant colonel" (poručnik pukovnik / поручник пуковникin).

Military history of Serbia

The military history of Serbia spans over 1100 years on the Balkan peninsula during the various forms of the Serbian state and Serbian army.

Obor-kapetan

obor-kapetan (Serbian Cyrillic: обор-капетан), or ober-kapetan (обер-капетан), was a rank held by the Serb hajduks in the service of the Habsburg Monarchy in the Kingdom of Serbia (1718–39). Following the successful Austro-Turkish War of 1716–18, and signing of peace, the Habsburgs established the Kingdom of Serbia and appointed the first command cadre of the Serbian National Militia, composed out of two obor-kapetans, ten kapetans, two lieutenants and one major. The obor-kapetans were Vuk Isaković "Crnobarac" and Staniša Marković "Mlatišuma". The rank of obor-kapetan signified a higher rank than kapetan (captain). During the Austro-Russian–Turkish War (1735–39), the Serbian National Militia was divided into 18 companies, in four groups (obor-kapetanije). In this period, the most notable obor-kapetans were Vuk Isaković from Crna Bara, Mlatišuma from Kragujevac and Kosta Dimitrijević from Paraćin.

Outline of Serbia

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Serbia:

Serbia – landlocked sovereign country located in Southeastern Europe and comprising the southern portion of the Pannonian Plain and a central portion of the Balkan Peninsula. Serbia is bordered by Hungary to the north; Romania and Bulgaria to the east; North Macedonia and constitutionally only, Albania (via Kosovo, a disputed territory over which Serbia has no control, thus no direct access to Albania) to the south; and Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro to the west. The capital of Serbia is Belgrade.

For centuries, shaped at cultural boundaries between East and West, a powerful medieval kingdom – later renamed the Serbian Empire – occupied much of the Balkans. Torn by domestic feuds, Ottoman, Hungarian, and later, Austrian incursions, the Serbian state collapsed by the mid-16th century. The positive outcome of the Serbian revolution in 1817 marked the birth of modern Serbia. Within a century it reacquired Kosovo, Raška and Vardar Macedonia from the Ottoman Empire. Likewise, in 1918 the former autonomous Habsburg crownland of Vojvodina proclaimed its secession from Austria-Hungary to unite with Serbia, preceded by the Syrmia region.

The current borders of the country were established following the end of World War II, when Serbia became a federal unit within the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

Serbia became an independent state again in 2006, after Montenegro left the union that formed after the dissolution of Yugoslavia in 1990s.

In February 2008, the parliament of Kosovo unilaterally declared independence from Serbia. Serbia's government, as well as the UN Security Council, have not recognized Kosovo's independence. The response from the international community has been mixed.

Serbia is a member of the United Nations, the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, and the Council of Europe, and is an associate member of the European Union.

Serbian Armed Forces

The Serbian Armed Forces (Serbian: Војска Србије / Vojska Srbije) form the armed forces of the Republic of Serbia. The Armed Forces consist of:

the Army

the Air Force and Air Defence

the Training Command

the Guard

the Special ForcesThe highest authority in the Armed Forces as well as in the defense system of the country, in-charge of the deployment and preparation of the Armed Forces in peace and war, is the General Staff. The President of the Republic acts as Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces. The Serbian Armed Forces are a professional- and volunteer-based military. Serbia exercises civilian control of the military through the Ministry of Defence.

Vojvoda (Serbia and Yugoslavia)

Vojvoda (Serbian Cyrillic: Војвода) literally "war-leader" from old Serbian was the highest rank in the army of the Kingdom of Serbia and Kingdom of Yugoslavia from 1901 until end of Second World War in 1945. It has roots from the medieval term Voivode used during medieval Kingdom, Empire аnd Principality of Serbia. Vojvodain medieval and later principality of Serbia had similar meaning as Duke title in other feudal states as it was military and noble title. In modern military terms the rank of Vojvoda is comparable with Field marshal and Generalfeldmarschall but since it can be an honorable title it is not always a military rank of a commissioned military officer.

It was first created with the passing of the law on the Organization of the Army of the Kingdom of Serbia in 1901 and later confirmed in Kingdom of Yugoslavia laws on the Organization of the Army and Navy from 1923 and 1929 Law from 1901 was passed on the suggestion of Lieutenant colonel (later Divisional General) Miloš Vasić who was Minister of the Defense at the time. The rank was awarded only during the war for Particular military contributions of top generals.

In the Balkan Wars and World War I this title was used to designate the highest military rank in Serbian Army. The first Vojvoda was promoted by the Great military decree of the Kingdom of Serbia on October 20, 1912. Only four people ever officially held that rank: Radomir Putnik (in 1912), Stepa Stepanović (middle 1914), Živojin Mišić (late 1914) and Petar Bojović (1918).

Before this rank was introduced, the highest rank in the Kingdom of Serbia was Army general (Kingdom of Yugoslavia). After Second World War, the newly formed Yugoslav People's Army stopped using Royal ranking system, so this rank ceased to exist.

Yugoslav People's Army ranks

The Yugoslav People's Army ranks are the military insignia used by the Yugoslav People's Army.

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