Military ranks of Brazil

This article presents the insignia and ranks of the Brazilian military. These ranks originate from those adopted upon Brazil's independence from Portugal in 1822. Nowadays they are defined by Act no. 6880 of December 9, 1980.[1] The following ranks show Brazil's military insignia and its corresponding NATO codes.

Air Force ranks date from 1941, when the Brazilian Air Force (Força Aérea Brasileira) was organized as a merger of the Navy's Aeronaval Force and the Army's Aviation Service.[2]

Military of Brazil
Coat of arms of Brazil

Components
Army
Air Force
Navy
Military Police
Ranks
Military ranks of Brazil
History
Military history of Brazil

Rank table

The shoulder epaulette pads from Navy and Air Force indicate both rank and specialty branch. The air force examples below are shown without branch designation marks on the epaulettes, with the exception of the ranks of Marshal of the Air Force and Air Chief Marshal, which can only be occupied by aviators. Army shoulder pads do not represent branch, as this is indicated elsewhere in the uniform like on the cuff and sleeves of the dress and everyday uniforms.

Officers

Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer
Brazil Brazil
(Edit)
Marshal
Army General
Divisional General
Brigade General
No equivalent
Colonel
Lieutenant Colonel
Major
Captain
First Lieutenant
Second Lieutenant
Aspirant Officer
Marechal General-de-exército General-de-divisão General-de-brigada Coronel Tenente-coronel Major Capitão Primeiro tenente Segundo tenente Aspirante-a-oficial
 Brazil
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US Navy O11 shoulderboard.svgGeneric-Navy-O12.svg US Navy O10 shoulderboard.svgGeneric-Navy-O11.svg US Navy O9 shoulderboard.svgGeneric-Navy-O10.svg US Navy O8 shoulderboard.svgGeneric-Navy-O9.svg No equivalent Generic-Navy-O7.svg Generic-Navy-O5.svg Generic-Navy-O4.svg Generic-Navy-O3.svg Generic-Navy-O2.svg Generic-Navy-O1.svg PLANF-Sleeve-0710-CDT.png
Almirante Almirante-de-esquadra Vice-almirante Contra-almirante Capitão-de-Mar-e-Guerra Capitão-de-Fragata Capitão-de-corveta Capitão-tenente Primeiro-tenente Segundo-tenente Guarda-marinha
Brazil Brazil
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Brazilian Air Force marshal of the air rank insignia.svg Brazilian Air Force Lieutenant-Brigadier rank insignia.svg Brazilian Air Force Major-Brigadier rank insignia.svg Brazilian Air Force Brigadier rank insignia.svg No equivalent CoronelFAB-V.png Tenente-Coronel FAB.gif Major-vertical fab.gif Capitão FAB.png Primeiro-Tenente FAB.gif AspiranteFABrasil.png
Marechal-do-ar
(Marshal of the Air)
Tenente-brigadeiro
(Lieutenant-Brigadier)
Major-brigadeiro
(Major-Brigadier)
Brigadeiro-do-ar
(Brigadier)
Coronel
(Colonel)
Tenente-coronel
(Lieutenant-Colonel)
Major
(Major)
Capitão
(Captain)
Primeiro-tenente
(First Lieutenant)
Segundo-tenente
(Second Lieutenant)
Aspirante
(Aspirant)
Brazil Brazil
(Military Police)

(Edit)
No equivalent
Insignia PM O1.PNG
Insignia PM O2.PNG
Insignia PM O3.PNG
Insignia PM O4.PNG
Insignia PM O5.PNG
Insignia PM O6.PNG
Insignia PM O7.PNG
Coronel Tenente-coronel Major Capitão Primeiro tenente Segundo tenente Aspirante
Brazil Brazil
(Firefighters)

(Edit)
No equivalent
Cmd Geral CBM AP.PNG
Cmd Geral CBM ES.PNG
Insignia PM O1.PNG
Insignia PM O2.PNG
Insignia PM O3.PNG
Insignia PM O4.PNG
Insignia PM O5.PNG
Insignia PM O6.PNG
Insignia PM O7.PNG
Commandant General Second Commandant Coronel Tenente-coronel Major Capitão Primeiro tenente Segundo tenente Aspirante
Equivalent
NATO code
OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1 OF(D) and student officer

NCO and enlisted grades

Equivalent
NATO Code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1
Brazil Brazil
(Edit)
Subtenente No equivalent
Primeiro-Sargento..png Segundo-Sargento.png Terceiro-Sargento.png Cabo.png No equivalent Soldado.png No equivalent
Subtenente Primeiro-Sargento Segundo-Sargento Terceiro-Sargento Cabo
Taifeiro-mor
Soldado
Taifeiro
Brazil Brazil
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Suboficial MB1 No equivalent Primeiro-Sargento MB.png Segundo-Sargento MB.png Terceiro-Sargento MB.png Cabo MB.png No equivalent Marinheiro MB.png No equivalent
Suboficial Primeiro-Sargento Segundo-Sargento Terceiro-Sargento Cabo Marinheiro
Soldado Fuzileiro Naval
Brazil Brazil
(Edit)
Suboficial fab No equivalent Praça 1Sgt FAB.PNG Praça 2Sgt FAB.PNG Praça 3Sgt FAB.PNG Praça Cb FAB.PNG No equivalent Praça Sd FAB.PNG No equivalent
Suboficial Primeiro-Sargento Segundo-Sargento Terceiro-Sargento Cabo
Taifeiro-mor
Soldado
Taifeiro
Brazil Brazil
(Military Police)

(Edit)
Insignia PM O8.PNG No equivalent Insignia PM P1.PNG Insignia PM P2.PNG Insignia PM P3.PNG Insignia PM P5.PNG No equivalent
Insignia PM P6.PNG
Subtenente Primeiro-sargento Segundo-sargento Terceiro-sargento Cabo Soldado
Brazil Brazil
(Military Firefighters)

(Edit)
Insignia PM O8.PNG No equivalent Insignia BM P1.PNG Insignia BM P2.PNG Insignia BM P4.PNG Insignia BM P5.PNG No equivalent
Insignia BM P3.PNG
Subtenente Primeiro-Sargento Segundo-Sargento Terceiro-Sargento Cabo Bombeiro
primeira classe
Equivalent
NATO Code
OR-9 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Act no. 6880 of December 9, 1980.
  2. ^ Instituto Histórico e Cultural da Aeronáutica, História geral da aeronáutica brasileira, v. 3

External links

Armed Forces of the Empire of Brazil

The Armed Forces of the Empire of Brazil were the overall unified military forces of the Empire of Brazil. The Brazilian military was first formed by Emperor Dom Pedro I to defend the new nation against the Portuguese in the Brazilian War of Independence. The Army and Armada (as the Navy was called) were commissioned in 1822 with the objective of defeating and expelling the Portuguese troops from Brazilian soil.

From the time of its inception, the military played a decisive role in the history of the Empire of Brazil. A sense of national unity and identity was forged out of the victorious Paraguayan War. The Emperor was commander-in-chief of the military, with the Ministries of War and Navy as the main organs by which military policy was carried out.

Brazilian Air Force

The Brazilian Air Force (Portuguese: Força Aérea Brasileira, FAB) is the air branch of the Brazilian Armed Forces and one of the three national uniformed services. The FAB was formed when the Army and Navy air branch were merged into a single military force initially called "National Air Forces" in 1941. Both air branches transferred their equipment, installations and personnel to the new force.

According to the Flight International (Flightglobal.com) and the International Institute for Strategic Studies, the Brazilian Air Force has an active strength of 80.937 military personnel and operates around 566 aircraft. The Brazilian Air Force is the largest air force in the Southern Hemisphere and the second largest in the Americas after the United States Air Force.

Brazilian Armed Forces

The Brazilian Armed Forces (Portuguese: Forças Armadas Brasileiras, IPA: [ˈfoʁsɐz ɐʁˈmadɐz bɾaziˈlejɾɐs]) is the unified military organization comprising the Brazilian Army (including the Brazilian Army Aviation), the Brazilian Navy (including the Brazilian Marine Corps and Brazilian Naval Aviation) and the Brazilian Air Force.Brazil's armed forces are the third largest in the Americas, after the United States and Colombia, and the largest in Latin America by the level of military equipment, with 318,480 active-duty troops and officers. With no serious external or internal threats, the armed forces are searching for a new role. They are expanding their presence in the Amazon under the Northern Corridor (Calha Norte) program. In 1994 Brazilian troops joined United Nations (UN) peacekeeping forces in five countries. Brazilian soldiers have been in Haiti since 2004 leading the United Nations Stabilization Mission (MINUSTAH).The Brazilian military, especially the army, has become more involved in civic-action programs, education, health care, and constructing roads, bridges, and railroads across the nation. Although the 1988 constitution preserves the external and internal roles of the armed forces, it places the military under presidential authority. Thus, the new charter changed the manner in which the military could exercise its moderating power.

Brazilian Navy

The Brazilian Navy (Portuguese: Marinha do Brasil) is the naval service branch of the Brazilian Armed Forces, responsible for conducting naval operations. The Brazilian Navy is the largest navy in South America and in Latin America, and the second largest navy in the Americas, after the United States Navy.The navy was involved in Brazil's war of independence from Portugal. Most of Portugal's naval forces and bases in South America were transferred to the newly independent country. In the initial decades following independence, the country maintained a large naval force and the navy was later involved in the Cisplatine War, the River Plate conflicts, the Paraguayan War as well as other sporadic rebellions that marked Brazilian history.

By the 1880s the Brazilian Imperial Navy was the most powerful in South America. After the 1893 naval rebellion, there was a hiatus in the development of the navy until 1905, when Brazil acquired two of the most powerful and advanced dreadnoughts of the day which sparked a dreadnought race with Brazil's South American neighbours. The Brazilian Navy participated in both World War I and World War II, engaging in anti-submarine patrols in the Atlantic.

The modern Brazilian Navy includes British-built guided missile frigates (FFG), locally built corvettes (FFL), coastal diesel-electric submarines (SSK) and many other river and coastal patrol craft.

Brigadier general

Brigadier general (Brig. Gen.) or brigade general is a senior rank in the armed forces. It is the lowest ranking general officer in some countries, usually sitting between the ranks of colonel and major general. When appointed to a field command, a brigadier general is typically in command of a brigade consisting of around 4,000 troops (four battalions). In some countries a brigadier general is informally designated as a one-star general (OF-6).

In some countries, this rank is given the name of brigadier, which is usually equivalent to brigadier general in the armies of nations that use the rank.

The rank can be traced back to the militaries of Europe where a "brigadier general", or simply a "brigadier", would command a brigade in the field. The rank name général de brigade (which translates as "brigade general") was first used in the French revolutionary armies.

In the first quarter of the 20th century, British and Commonwealth armies used the rank of brigadier general as a temporary appointment, or as an honorary appointment on retirement; in the 1920s this practice changed to the use of brigadier, which was not classed as a general officer.

Some armies, such as Taiwan and Japan, use major general as the equivalent of brigadier general (See also Japan & Taiwan for details.). Some of these armies then use the rank of colonel general to make four general-officer ranks.Mexico uses the ranks of both General brigadier and General de brigada.

General (Brazil)

The military rank of general in Brazil is held by officers that can use two, three or four stars. They are named in Brazilian Army as General de Brigada (two stars), General de Divisão (three stars) and General de Exército (four stars).

General officers in Brazilian Navy are called as almirante and in Brazilian Air Force as brigadeiro.

Major general

Major general (abbreviated MG, Maj. Gen. and similar) is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general. The disappearance of the "sergeant" in the title explains the apparently confusing phenomenon whereby a lieutenant general outranks a major general while a major outranks a lieutenant.

In the Commonwealth and the United States, it is a division commander's rank subordinate to the rank of lieutenant general and senior to the ranks of brigadier and brigadier general. In the Commonwealth, major general is equivalent to the navy rank of rear admiral, and in air forces with a separate rank structure, it is equivalent to air vice-marshal.

In some countries, including much of Eastern Europe, major general is the lowest of the general officer ranks, with no brigadier-grade rank.

Marshal (Brazil)

Marshal (Portuguese: Marechal) is the highest rank in both the Brazilian Army and the Brazilian Air Force, although the latter is titled Marechal-do-Ar (literally Marshal of the Air). These ranks are equivalent to that of Admiral in the Navy. A marshal is distinguished by using five stars, which for a marshal of the air are in the approximate position of Southern Cross and for a marshal in the army, in the form of "X". The five stars of Admiral are in the shape of a pentagon.

Until the structural reform of 1967 in the Brazilian Army, army generals (bearing four stars), when moving to the reserve, were awarded the fifth star automatically. With the reform, it was established that there would be only the promotion of a general to marshal in the event of war, thus extinguishing the rank of marshal within the army in times of peace. Those dubbed as marshals prior to such reform, however, would still bear such titles for the reminder of their lives. The last living Brazilian Army marshal, Marshal Waldemar Levy Cardoso, died in May 2009.

During the days of the Imperial Period (between 1822 and 1889), the patent, regarding the Army, was named "marshal of the army" (Portuguese: Marechal-do-Exército), having been renamed to its shorter current counterpart with the advent of the Republic after 1889.

Although a large number of marshals existed within Brazilian ranks in the second half of the 20th century as mentioned above, the last active marshal in the Brazilian Army (i.e., that to hold office in the command of active troops) was Marshal Mascarenhas de Morais, holding the position of commander of the Brazilian Expeditionary Force, a special Corps assembled to fight alongside the Allied forces in the Mediterranean theatre of World War II. Marshal Mascarenhas de Morais would bear said position and title for the reminder of his life (thus, until 1968, when he perished) as a result of a decree by the National Congress which dubbed the position and title honorary lifetime in the form of active troops.

Some Marshals became President of Brazil, notably in the years following the establishment of the Republic in 1889 and also between the 1964 Brazilian coup d'état and the re-establishment of democracy in 1984/1985. Worthy mentions would be Marshal Deodoro da Fonseca and Floriano Peixoto (for the earlier aforementioned period) and Marshals Humberto de Alencar Castelo Branco and Artur da Costa e Silva (for the latter).

Military history of Brazil

The military history of Brazil comprises centuries of armed actions in the territory encompassing modern Brazil, and the role of the Brazilian Armed Forces in conflicts and peacekeeping worldwide. For several hundreds of years, the area was the site of intertribal wars of indigenous peoples. Beginning in the 16th century, the arrival of Portuguese explorers led to conflicts with the aboriginal peoples; a notable example being the revolt of the Tamoio Confederation. Sporadic revolts of African slaves also marked the colonial period, with a notable rebellion led by Zumbi dos Palmares. Conflicts were encountered with other European nations as well – two notable examples being the France Antarctique affair, and a conflict with the Netherlands in the early 17th century over control of much of the Northeast. Although Portugal retained its possessions during conflicts with other nations, it lost control of the colony after the Brazilian war of Independence, which led to the establishment of the Empire of Brazil.

Brazil's history after independence is marked by early territorial wars against its neighboring countries which have greatly affected the formation of current political boundaries. For example, the Cisplatine War, fought over the present day territory of Uruguay established that nation's independence. Brazil was also affected in its infancy by minor – and ultimately, unsuccessful – revolts in the Northern provinces. An armed conflict with Paraguay led to an establishment of Brazil's current border with that nation after a decisive victory. Internal conflicts between the executive government and the power of wealthy landowners finally led to the abolishment of the Brazilian Empire, and the rise of the current republican government.

Modern activity includes participation in both World Wars along with internal struggles due to military rule, and participation in right wing military operations, such as Operation Condor. Recent developments include participation in peacekeeping efforts after the 2004 Haiti rebellion.

Outline of Brazil

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Brazil:

Brazil – largest country in both South America and the Latin America region. It is the world's fifth largest country, both by geographical area, 8.5 million km², and by population, with over 206 million people. It is the largest lusophone country in the world, and the only one in the Americas.

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