Military Bowl

The Military Bowl is a post-season National Collegiate Athletic Association-sanctioned Division I college football bowl game that has been played annually each December in the Washington metropolitan area since 2008. The game was originally held at Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium in Washington, D.C. before moving to Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland in 2013.[1] The 2014 through 2019 games are featuring teams from the American Athletic Conference and the Atlantic Coast Conference.[2][3]

During initial planning stages, the game was known as the Congressional Bowl, but was first played in 2008 as the EagleBank Bowl sponsored by Washington-area financial institution EagleBank. After Northrop Grumman, one of the world's leading defense contractors, became its sponsor in 2010, it was officially renamed the Military Bowl presented by Northrop Grumman.[4]

Military Bowl
Military Bowl presented by Northrop Grumman
MilitaryBowl
StadiumNavy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium
LocationAnnapolis, Maryland
Previous stadiumsRobert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium
Previous locationsWashington, D.C. (2008–2012)
Operated2008–present
Conference tie-insACC & American
Previous conference tie-insArmy, Navy, C-USA
PayoutUS$1 million (each)
Sponsors
EagleBank (2008–2009)
Northrop Grumman (2010–present)
Former names
Congressional Bowl (2008, working title)
EagleBank Bowl (2008–09)
2017 matchup
Virginia vs. Navy (Navy 49–7)
2018 matchup
Cincinnati vs. Virginia Tech (Cincinnati 35–31)

Origins

The idea for the EagleBank Bowl originated with the Washington, D.C. Bowl Committee, a group founded by Marie Rudolph and Sean Metcalf in December 2006 with the intended purpose of bringing a bowl game to the Washington, D.C. area as a boon to the region's economy.[5] The D.C. Sports and Entertainment Commission and the Washington, D.C. Convention and Tourism Corporation announced their support of the proposed event in 2007.[5]

History

The bowl game was one of two approved by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) for the 2008 college football bowl season, the other being the St. Petersburg Bowl. The NCAA's Postseason Football Licensing Subcommittee approved the bowl on April 30, 2008, allowing the committee that had proposed the game to host it after the 2008 college football season.[6] The inaugural game had its kickoff scheduled for 11 AM EST on December 20, 2008, making it the first bowl game of the 2008–09 bowl season.

In 2010, organizers announced that the NCAA had granted a four-year extension of the game's Bowl Certification, taking it through the 2013–14 bowl season;[7] additionally, the game received sponsorship from Northrop Grumman and was renamed. In 2010, the game generated in excess of $18 million for the Washington, D.C. area. Also, over $100,000 was donated to the USO.[8]

Conference tie-ins

Prior to the game's approval by the NCAA, Navy and the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) signed agreements to participate in the game if it was approved.[9][10] Under the agreement, the ACC would provide its ninth-best team for the bowl if the league had nine bowl eligible teams.[11] In December 2008, the initial game featured Navy against Wake Forest representing the ACC.

Along with its ACC tie-in, the bowl signed an agreement with Army to play in the 2009 edition of the game, however Army did not finish its season bowl eligible. Additionally, the ACC did not have enough eligible teams and Conference USA (C-USA) could not provide a team, so organizers chose Mid-American Conference (MAC) team Temple to fill one spot and Pac-10 Conference team UCLA to fill the other spot.

For the 2010 through 2013 games, the bowl reached agreement for an ACC team to face a C-USA team (2010), Navy (2011), Army (2012), and a Big 12 team (2013).[7] If Navy or Army were not bowl eligible, a Big 12 team would be selected in 2011, and a C-USA team in 2012.[12] In 2012, Army was not bowl eligible and the ACC could not supply a team,[13] so a MAC vs. Western Athletic Conference (WAC) matchup was organized.

Starting with the 2014 game, organizers entered a six-year agreement for the game to feature an ACC vs. American Athletic Conference (The American) matchup.[14][3]

Season Contracted tie-ins Date played Actual participants
2008 ACC Navy December 20, 2008 ACC Navy
2009 Army December 29, 2009 MAC Pac-10
2010 C-USA December 29, 2010 ACC C-USA
2011 Navy alt. Big 12 December 28, 2011 MAC Mountain West
2012 Army alt. C-USA December 27, 2012 MAC WAC
2013 Big 12 December 27, 2013 ACC C-USA
2014 The American December 27, 2014 ACC The American
2015 December 28, 2015 ACC The American
2016 December 27, 2016 ACC The American
2017 December 28, 2017 ACC The American
2018 December 31, 2018 ACC The American
2019

Bold conference denotes winner of games played.

Game results

Rankings are based on the AP Poll prior to the game.

No. Date Bowl name Winning team Losing team Attendance
1 December 20, 2008 EagleBank Wake Forest 29 Navy 19 28,777
2 December 29, 2009 EagleBank UCLA 30 Temple 21 23,072
3 December 29, 2010 Military Maryland 51 East Carolina 20 38,062
4 December 28, 2011 Military Toledo 42 Air Force 41 25,042
5 December 27, 2012 Military # 24 San Jose State 29 Bowling Green 20 17,835
6 December 27, 2013 Military Marshall 31 Maryland 20 30,163
7 December 27, 2014 Military Virginia Tech 33 Cincinnati 17 34,277
8 December 28, 2015 Military # 21 Navy 44 Pittsburgh 28 36,352
9 December 27, 2016 Military Wake Forest 34 # 23 Temple 26 26,656
10 December 28, 2017 Military Navy 49 Virginia 7 35,921
11 December 31, 2018 Military Cincinnati 35 Virginia Tech 31 32,832
First five editions at Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium in Washington, D.C.
Subsequent games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland

MVPs

Date MVP School Position
December 20, 2008 Riley Skinner Wake Forest QB
December 29, 2009 Akeem Ayers UCLA LB
December 29, 2010 Da'Rel Scott Maryland RB
December 28, 2011 Bernard Reedy Toledo WR
December 27, 2012 David Fales San Jose State QB
December 27, 2013 Rakeem Cato Marshall QB
December 27, 2014 J. C. Coleman Virginia Tech RB
December 28, 2015 Keenan Reynolds Navy QB
December 27, 2016 Thomas Brown Wake Forest LB
December 28, 2017 Zach Abey Navy QB
December 31, 2018 Mike Warren Cincinnati RB

Most appearances

Updated through the December 2018 edition (11 games, 22 total appearances).

Teams with multiple appearances
Rank Team Appearances Record
1 Navy 3 2–1
T2 Wake Forest 2 2–0
T2 Cincinnati 2 1–1
T2 Maryland 2 1–1
T2 Virginia Tech 2 1–1
T2 Temple 2 0–2
Teams with a single appearance

Won: Marshall, San Jose State, Toledo, UCLA
Lost: Air Force, Bowling Green, East Carolina, Pittsburgh, Virginia

Appearances by conference

Updated through the December 2018 edition (11 games, 22 total appearances).

Conference Record Appearances by season
Games W L Win pct. Won Lost
ACC 8 4 4 .500 2008, 2010, 2014, 2016 2013, 2015, 2017, 2018
The American 5 3 2 .600 2015, 2017, 2018 2014, 2016
MAC 3 1 2 .333 2011 2009, 2012
C-USA 2 1 1 .500 2013 2010
Pac-10 1 1 0 1.000 2009  
WAC 1 1 0 1.000 2012  
Independents 1 0 1 .000   2008
Mountain West 1 0 1 .000   2011
  • Independent appearances: Navy (2008)

Media coverage

The bowl has been televised by ESPN since its inception.

See also

References

  1. ^ Patterson, Chip (May 20, 2013). "Military Bowl moving to Annapolis, adds Conference USA for '13". Eye on College Football. CBSSports.com. Retrieved May 21, 2013.
  2. ^ "American Athletic Conference Partners With Military Bowl Presented by Northrop Grumman". theamerican.org.
  3. ^ a b http://www.militarybowl.org/military-bowl-presented-by-northrop-grumman-announces-continued-partnership-with-the-atlantic-coast-conference/
  4. ^ "Bowl game in U.S. capital renamed Military Bowl". ESPN.com. 26 October 2010.
  5. ^ a b Proposed D.C. Bowl Would Feature Service Academies The Washington Post. November 29, 2007. Accessed April 30, 2008.
  6. ^ NCAA committee approves 34 football bowl games The Associated Press, ESPN.com. April 30, 2008. Accessed April 30, 2008.
  7. ^ a b http://militarybowl.org/d-cs-eaglebank-bowl-granted-four-year-extension/
  8. ^ http://militarybowl.org/uso-district-of-columbia-to-again-benefit-from-the-military-bowls-return-to-rfk-stadium-on-december-28/
  9. ^ Mids could play in new D.C. bowl game in 2008 The Navy Times, December 12, 2007. Accessed April 30, 2008.
  10. ^ Johnson on DC Bowl: We'll play Navy Scout.com. March 31, 2008. Accessed April 30, 2008.
  11. ^ Group awaits decision on bowl Tim Lemke, The Washington Times. April 18, 2008. Accessed April 30, 2008.
  12. ^ http://militarybowl.org/eaglebank-bowl-announces-bowl-lineups-for-2010-2013/
  13. ^ /http://www.al.com/sports/index.ssf/2012/12/military_bowl_reports_college.html
  14. ^ http://collegefootball.ap.org/article/military-bowl-strikes-deal-american

External links

2009 EagleBank Bowl

The 2009 EagleBank Bowl was a college football bowl game. It marked the second edition of the EagleBank Bowl, played at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C. The game, in which UCLA of the Pacific-10 Conference defeated Temple of the Mid-American Conference, 30–21, started at 4:30 PM US EST on Tuesday, December 29, 2009. The game was telecast on ESPN and was organized by the DC Bowl Committee, Inc., the Washington Convention and Sports Authority, and its title sponsor.

2010 Military Bowl

The 2010 Military Bowl presented by Northrop Grumman was the third edition of the college football bowl game previously called the EagleBank Bowl. It was played as scheduled at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C. on December 29, 2010, at 2:30 p.m. (ET), and telecast on ESPN. The event remains sponsored by EagleBank and is organized by the DC Bowl Committee, Inc. and the Washington Convention and Sports Authority.

2011 Military Bowl

The 2011 Military Bowl Presented by Northrop Grumman, the fourth edition of the game, was a post-season American college football bowl game, held on December 28, 2011, at Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium in Washington, D.C. as part of the 2011–12 NCAA bowl season.

The game, which telecast at 4:30 p.m. ET on ESPN, featured the Air Force Falcons from the Mountain West Conference versus the Toledo Rockets from the Mid-American Conference.

2011 Toledo Rockets football team

The 2011 Toledo Rockets football team represented the University of Toledo during the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Rockets were led by third-year head coach Tim Beckman during the regular season and new head coach Matt Campbell for their bowl game. They competed in the West Division of the Mid-American Conference and played their home games at the Glass Bowl. They finished the season 9–4, 7–1 in MAC play to be West Division co–champions with Northern Illinois. Due to their loss to Northern Illinois, they did not represent the division in the MAC Championship Game. They were invited to the Military Bowl where they defeated Air Force 42–41.

At the end of the regular season, head coach Tim Beckman resigned to become the new head coach at Illinois. Offensive coordinator Matt Campbell was named as Beckman's replacement and coached the Rockets in the Military Bowl. Beckman finished at Toledo with a three-year record of 21–16.

2012 Military Bowl

The 2012 Military Bowl presented by Northrop Grumman was a post-season American college football bowl game held on December 27, 2012, at Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium in Washington, D.C.. The fifth edition of the Military Bowl began at 3:00 p.m. EST and was shown on ESPN. It was between the San Jose State Spartans from the Western Athletic Conference and the Bowling Green Falcons from the Mid-American Conference and was the final game of the 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season for both teams. The Spartans accepted their invitation after earning a 10–2 record in the regular season, while the Falcons accepted after earning an 8–4 record on theirs.

This was the first Military Bowl appearance as well as the first meeting between these two teams. It proved to be the last edition of the Military Bowl played at RFK Stadium. On May 20, 2013, the bowl announced that future editions would be held at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland.

2012 San Jose State Spartans football team

The 2012 San Jose State Spartans football team represented San Jose State University in the 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Spartans were led by third year head coach Mike MacIntyre and played their home games at Spartan Stadium. They were members of the Western Athletic Conference. This was the Spartans' final season as members of the WAC. They joined the Mountain West Conference on July 1, 2013. They finished the season 11–2, 5–1 in WAC play to finish in second place. They were invited to the Military Bowl where they defeated Bowling Green.

Head coach Mike MacIntyre resigned at the end of the regular season to take the head coach position at Colorado. Defensive coordinator Kent Baer was the Spartans' interim head coach for the Military Bowl. San Diego head coach Ron Caragher was hired as the Spartans new head coach beginning in 2013.

2013 Marshall Thundering Herd football team

The 2013 Marshall Thundering Herd football team represented Marshall University in the 2013 NCAA Division I FBS football season. They were led by fourth-year head coach Doc Holliday and played their home games at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. They were a member of the East Division of Conference USA. They finished the season 10–4, 7–1 in C-USA play to win the East Division title. As East Division champions, they played West Division champions Rice in the C-USA Championship Game, losing to the Owls 24–41. They were invited to the Military Bowl where they defeated Maryland 31–20.

2013 Military Bowl

The 2013 Military Bowl was an American college football bowl game that was played on December 27, 2013, at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland. It was one of the 2013–14 bowl games that concluded the 2013 FBS football season. The sixth edition of the Military Bowl, it featured the Marshall Thundering Herd of Conference USA against the Maryland Terrapins (based in nearby College Park) from the Atlantic Coast Conference. The game began at 2:30 p.m. EST and aired on ESPN. It was sponsored by aerospace and defense technology company Northrop Grumman, and was officially known as the Military Bowl Presented by Northrop Grumman. Marshall defeated Maryland by a score of 31–20.

The Thundering Herd finished the regular season with a 9–4 record (7–1 C-USA), champions of the Conference USA East Division. The Terrapins had a record of 7–5 (3–5 ACC).This was the first Military Bowl to be played at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. The first five were played at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C.

2014 Military Bowl

The 2014 Military Bowl was a college football bowl game played on December 27, 2014 at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium on the campus of the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland in the United States. The seventh annual Military Bowl, it pitted the American Athletic Conference co-champion Cincinnati Bearcats against the Virginia Tech Hokies of the Atlantic Coast Conference. It was one of the 2014–15 bowl games will conclude the 2014 FBS football season. The game started at 1:00 p.m. EST and aired on ESPN. It was sponsored by aerospace and defense technology company Northrop Grumman and is officially known as the Military Bowl Presented by Northrop Grumman.

2014 Virginia Tech Hokies football team

The 2014 Virginia Tech Hokies football team represented the Virginia Tech in the 2014 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Hokies were led by 28th-year head coach Frank Beamer and played their home games at Lane Stadium in Blacksburg, Virginia. They were members of the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 7–6, 3–5 in ACC play to finish in a three way tie for fifth place in the Coastal Division. They were invited to the Military Bowl where they defeated Cincinnati.

2015 Military Bowl

The 2015 Military Bowl was a post-season American college football bowl game played on December 28, 2015 at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland. The eighth edition of the Military Bowl featured the Pittsburgh Panthers of the Atlantic Coast Conference against the hometown Navy Midshipmen of the American Athletic Conference. It began at 2:30 p.m. EST and aired on ESPN. It was one of the 2015–16 bowl games that concluded the 2015 FBS football season. Sponsored by aerospace and defense technology company Northrop Grumman, it was officially known as the Military Bowl presented by Northrop Grumman.

2015 Navy Midshipmen football team

The 2015 Navy Midshipmen football team represented the United States Naval Academy in the 2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Midshipmen were led by eighth-year head coach Ken Niumatalolo and played their home games at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. The Midshipmen competed as a member of the Western Division of the American Athletic Conference, and were first year members of the conference. In their entire football history, this was the first season that Navy did not compete as an Independent. They finished the season 11–2, 7–1 in American Athletic play to finish in a tie for the Western Division title with Houston. However, due to their head to head loss to Houston, they did not represent the Western Division in the American Championship. They were invited to the Military Bowl where they defeated Pittsburgh.

2016 Military Bowl

The 2016 Military Bowl was a postseason college football bowl game, played at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland, on December 27, 2016.

The ninth edition of the Military Bowl featured the American Athletic Conference champion Temple Owls versus the Wake Forest Demon Deacons of Atlantic Coast Conference.

2016 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team

The 2016 Wake Forest Demon Deacons football team represented Wake Forest University during the 2016 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Dave Clawson, who was in his third season at the school, and played its home games at BB&T Field. Wake Forest competed in the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference, as they have since the league's inception in 1953. They finished the season 7–6, 3–5 in ACC play to finish in a tie for fourth place in the Atlantic Division. They were invited to the Military Bowl where they defeated Temple.

When Wake Forest lost to Louisville on November 12, Dave Clawson alleged that Louisville had received impermissible information that benefited the Cardinals on the football field. On December 14, 2016, after a month long probe, several media outlets reported that former Wake Forest staff member and IMG College radio analyst Tommy Elrod had been dismissed from the program for leaking confidential and proprietary game preparations on multiple occasions.

2017 Military Bowl

The 2017 Military Bowl was a postseason college football bowl game played at Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland, on December 28, 2017. The game was the 10th edition of the Military Bowl and featured the Virginia Cavaliers of the Atlantic Coast Conference and the Navy Midshipmen of the American Athletic Conference. Sponsored by defense contractor Northrop Grumman, the game was officially known as the Military Bowl presented by Northrop Grumman.

2018 Military Bowl

The 2018 Military Bowl was a college football bowl game that was played on December 31, 2018. It was the 11th edition of the Military Bowl, and was one of the 2018–19 bowl games concluding the 2018 FBS football season. Sponsored by defense contractor Northrop Grumman, the game was officially known as the Military Bowl presented by Northrop Grumman.

2019 Military Bowl

The 2019 Military Bowl is a college football bowl game that will be played on December 27, 2019, with kickoff scheduled for 12:00 p.m. EST on ESPN. It will be the 12th edition of the Military Bowl, and will be one of the 2019–20 bowl games concluding the 2019 FBS football season. Sponsored by defense contractor Northrup Grumman, the game will be officially known as the Military Bowl presented by Northrup Grumman.

List of Military Bowl broadcasters

List of television broadcasters of the Military Bowl, which was known as the EagleBank Bowl prior to 2010.

List of Navy Midshipmen bowl games

Until 2015 the Navy Midshipmen football team, who represent the United States Naval Academy. were an independent school in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS). Since the start of the 2015 season Navy has been a member of the American Athletic Conference. The Midshipmen have played in 20 post-season bowl games and have a record of nine wins, ten losses, and one tie.Prior to the school's first true bowl game, a team of Navy players from Naval Station Great Lakes played in the 1919 Rose Bowl; however, that game during World War I was not a true college football game, since it drew teams from the armed services personnel. Navy's first post-season bowl game was at the conclusion of the 1923 college football season, when they played the Washington Huskies in the 1924 Rose Bowl. During the Great Depression in 1930 and 1931, the Midshipmen played the Army Cadets before large crowds at Yankee Stadium (1923) in postseason charity games, with Army winning both contests.With the exception of the 1942 season, Navy finished each season between 1941 and 1945 ranked in the top ten teams in the Associated Press College Poll, but did not play in a bowl game. The Midshipmen ranked in the top five teams in the Associated Press poll after the 1954, 1957, 1960, and 1963 college football seasons, and played in the 1955 Sugar Bowl, the 1958 Cotton Bowl Classic, the 1961 Orange Bowl, and the 1964 Cotton Bowl Classic, respectively. At its second appearance at the Cotton Bowl Classic, Heisman Trophy winner Roger Staubach led the Midshipmen against the undefeated Texas Longhorns in a 28–6 loss.After coach Wayne Hardin's departure in 1964, the Midshipmen did not play in a bowl game until the inaugural edition of the Holiday Bowl in 1978. After sporadic bowl game appearances in the 1980s and 90s, Navy hired coach Paul Johnson in 2002. Using an updated form of the triple option offense, Johnson led the team to five straight bowl appearances between 2002 and 2006. Two weeks prior to the 2007 Poinsettia Bowl, Johnson left Navy to coach the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets. He was replaced by Ken Niumatalolo, who has led the team to bowl games in six out of the last seven seasons. Most recently, the Midshipmen won the 2015 Military Bowl against the Pittsburgh Panthers. Navy became a football-only member of the American Athletic Conference (formerly the Big East Conference) in 2015. Among the conference's bowl game tie-ins will be the Military Bowl, which moved to Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium beginning in 2013.

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