Miles J. Breuer

Miles John Breuer (January 3, 1889 – October 14, 1945) was an American physician and science fiction writer. He was part of the first generation of writers to appear regularly in the pulp science fiction magazines, publishing his first story, "The Man with the Strange Head", in the January 1927 issue of Amazing Stories. His best known works are "The Gostak and the Doshes" (1930) and two stories written jointly with Jack Williamson, "The Girl from Mars" (1929) and The Birth of a New Republic (1931).

Miles breuer sws
Miles J. Breuer, as pictured in the January 1930 issue of Science Wonder Stories
Amazing stories 193903
Breuer's "The Raid from Mars" was the cover story in the March 1939 issue of Amazing Stories

Early life and medical career

Breuer was born in Chicago, in 1889, to Charles and Barbara Breuer, Czech immigrants from the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The family moved to Nebraska in 1893 while Charles pursued a medical degree at Creighton University in Omaha, and Miles grew up in the Czech community of Crete, Nebraska. Miles graduated from Crete High School in 1906, and went on to earn a master's degree from the University of Texas in 1911. After earning a medical degree from Rush Medical College which at the time was at the University of Chicago in 1915, Miles joined his father's medical practice in Nebraska. In 1916 Miles married Julia Strejic and the couple had three children, Rosalie, Stanley, and Mildred.

During World War I Miles Breuer served for twenty months in France as a first lieutenant in the Army Medical Corps. Rejoining his father's medical practice after the war, Breuer contributed frequent medical articles to Czech-language newspapers, as well as a monthly health column in the country's largest Czech-language agricultural monthly. In 1925 he published a handbook called Index of Physiotherapeutic Technic, cataloging a variety of methods for physical therapy. Breuer suffered a nervous breakdown in December 1942, and shortly afterwards moved to Los Angeles, where he continued his medical practice until 1945, when he died after a brief illness.[1]

Writing career

Breuer's first published work of fiction was a Czech-language story called "The Man Without an Appetite" that appeared in the monthly Bratrsky Vestnik about 1916.[2] Breuer had long been interested in scientific romances, particularly those by H. G. Wells.[3] When Hugo Gernsback founded the first science fiction magazine, Amazing Stories, Breuer began writing and submitting stories, publishing his first, "The Man with the Strange Head", in the January 1927 issue. Over the next fifteen years he went on to write two novels, thirty-six shorter stories, and several other items for the science fiction magazines, including collaborations with Jack Williamson and Clare Winger Harris. A great majority were published in Amazing Stories (a monthly) and Amazing Stories Quarterly.[2]

Several of Breuer's stories have been included in anthologies and in 2008 Michael R. Page of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln edited a collection, The Man with the Strange Head and Other Early Science Fiction Stories, comprising ten stories, the novel Paradise and Iron, and Breuer's editorial essay "The Future of Scientifiction".

Jack Williamson called Breuer "among the first and best of the amateurs whose work Gernsback began to print."[4] Walter Gillings stated that Breuer wrote "some of the most intriguing tales that appeared in the early volumes of Amazing Stories,"[5] and John Clute described his work as crudely written, but intelligent and noted for new ideas.[6]

Works by Miles J. Breuer

This list is limited to speculative fiction as cataloged by the Internet Speculative Fiction Database. For Breuer as author or co-author, ISFDB lists the following one 1916 story and 44 items published from 1927 to 1942. It also catalogs ten letters to Amazing Stories and one to Wonder Stories, all 1927–31, and one 1930 illustration.[2]

Short stories

  • "The Man Without an Appetite" (Czech language, Bratrsky Vestnik c. 1916), Great Science Fiction About Doctors, ed. Noah D. Fabricant and Groff Conklin, Collier Books, 1963.[2]
  • "The Man with the Strange Head", Amazing Stories, January 1927. Reprinted in Big Book of Science Fiction, ed. Groff Conklin, Crown, 1950; Amazing Science Fiction Anthology: The Wonder Years 1926 - 1935; ed. Martin H. Greenberg, TSR, 1987; The Man with the Strange Head and Other Early Science Fiction Stories, ed. Michael R. Page, University of Nebraska Press, 2008.
  • "The Stone Cat", Amazing Stories, September 1927.
  • "The Riot at Sanderac", Amazing Stories, December 1927.
  • "The Puzzle Duel", Amazing Stories Quarterly, Winter 1928.
  • "The Appendix and the Spectacles", Amazing Stories, December 1928. Reprinted in The Science Fiction Galaxy, ed. Groff Conklin, Perma Books, 1950; The Mathematical Magpie, ed. Clifton Fadiman, Simon & Schuster, 1962; The Man with the Strange Head.
  • "The Captured Cross-Section", Amazing Stories, February 1929. Reprinted in Avon Fantasy Reader #12, ed. Donald A. Wollheim, Avon Novels, 1950; Fantasia Mathematica, ed. Clifton Fadiman, Simon & Schuster, 1958; Other Dimensions, ed. Robert Silverberg, Hawthorn Books, 1973.
  • "Buried Treasure", Amazing Stories, April 1929.
  • "The Book of Worlds", Amazing Stories, July 1929. Reprinted in Avon Science Fiction Reader #2, ed. Donald A. Wollheim, Avon Novels, 1951; Fantastic Stories, April 1969; New Horizons: Yesterday's Portraits of Tomorrow, ed. August Derleth, Arkham House, 1999.
  • "Rays and Men", Amazing Stories Quarterly, Summer 1929.
  • "The Girl from Mars" (with Jack Williamson), Science Fiction Series #1, November 1929. Reprinted in The Early Williamson, Jack Williamson, Doubleday, 1975; The Metal Man and Others: The Collected Stories of Jack Williamson, Volume One, Jack Williamson, Haffner, 1999.
  • "A Baby on Neptune" (with Clare Winger Harris), Amazing Stories, December 1929. Reprinted in Away from the Here and Now, Clare Winger Harris, Dorrance, 1947; Flight into Space, ed. Donald A. Wollheim, Fredrick Fell, 1950; Gosh! Wow! (Sense of Wonder) Science Fiction, ed. Forrest J. Ackerman, Bantam, 1982.
  • "The Fitzgerald Contraction", Science Wonder Stories, January 1930. Reprinted in Startling Stories, January 1942.
  • "The Hungry Guinea Pig", Amazing Stories, January 1930. Reprinted in Science Fiction Adventures in Mutation, ed. Groff Conklin, Vanguard Press, 1955; Amazing Stories, October 1961; Science Fiction Classics Annual, 1970; The Ascent of Wonder: The Evolution of Hard SF eds. David Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer, Tor, 1994.
  • "The Gostak and the Doshes", Amazing Stories, March 1930. Reprinted in Avon Fantasy Reader #10, ed. Donald A. Wollheim, Avon Novels, 1949; Science Fiction Adventures in Dimension, ed. Groff Conklin, Vanguard Press, 1953; Great Science Fiction by Scientists, ed. Groff Conklin, Collier Books, 1962; Science Fiction Classics, Fall 1967; The Arbor House Treasury of Science Fiction Masterpieces, eds. Robert Silverberg and Martin H. Greenberg, Arbor House, 1983; Amazing Stories: 60 Years of the Best Science Fiction, eds. Isaac Asimov and Martin H. Greenberg, TSR, 1985; Great Tales of Science Fiction, eds. Robert Silverberg and Martin H. Greenberg, Galahad Books, 1988; The Man with the Strange Head.
  • "The Driving Power", Amazing Stories, July 1930.
  • "The Time Valve", Wonder Stories, July 1930.
  • "The Inferiority Complex", Amazing Stories, September 1930.
  • "A Problem in Communication", Astounding Stories of Super-Science, September 1930. Reprinted in The Man with the Strange Head.
  • "On Board the Martian Liner", Amazing Stories, March 1931. Reprinted in The Man with the Strange Head.
  • "The Time Flight", Amazing Stories July 1931.
  • "The Demons of Rhadi-Mu", Amazing Stories Quarterly, Fall 1931.
  • "Mechanocracy", Amazing Stories, April 1932. Reprinted in The Man with the Strange Head.
  • "The Einstein See-Saw", Astounding Stories, April 1932. Reprinted in Avon Fantasy Reader #15, ed. Donald A. Wollheim, Avon Novels, 1951.
  • "The Perfect Planet", Amazing Stories, May 1932.
  • "The Finger of the Past", Amazing Stories, November 1932. Reprinted in The Man with the Strange Head.
  • "The Strength of the Weak", Amazing Stories, December 1933.
  • "Millions for Defense", Amazing Stories, March 1935. Reprinted in The Man with the Strange Head.
  • "Mars Colonizes", Marvel Tales, Summer 1935. Reprinted in The Garden of Fear and Other Stories, ed. William L. Crawford, Crawford Publication, 1949; The Man with the Strange Head.
  • "The Chemistry Murder Case", Amazing Stories, October 1935.
  • "Mr. Dimmitt Seeks Redress", Amazing Stories, August 1936. Reprinted in Amazing Stories, October 1966.
  • "The Company or the Weather", Amazing Stories, June 1937.
  • "Mr. Bowen's Wife Reduces", Amazing Stories, February 1938. Reprinted in Amazing Science Fiction, September 1970.
  • "The Raid from Mars", March 1939.
  • "The Disappearing Papers", Future Fiction, November 1939.
  • "The Oversight", Comet Stories, December 1940. Reprinted in The Man with the Strange Head.
  • "The Sheriff of Thorium Gulch", Amazing Stories, August 1942.

Novels

  • Paradise and Iron, Amazing Stories Quarterly, Summer 1930. Reprinted in The Man with the Strange Head.
  • The Birth of a New Republic (with Jack Williamson), Amazing Stories Quarterly, Winter 1931. Reprinted in The Metal Man and Others.

Poems

  • "The Specter", Weird Tales, March 1927.
  • "Via Scientiae", Amazing Stories, May 1930.
  • "Sonnet to Science", Amazing Stories, December 1930.

Essays

  • "The Future of Scientifiction", Amazing Stories Quarterly, Summer 1929. Reprinted in Science Fiction Classics, Summer 1968; The Man with the Strange Head.
  • "Meet the Authors", Amazing Stories, March 1939, by Isaac Asimov and five others.[2]
  • "The New Frontier", Startling Stories, May 1940.

References

  1. ^ Obituary, Lincoln Evening Journal, October 16, 1945.
  2. ^ a b c d e Miles J. Breuer at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB). Retrieved 2013-04-06. Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Select a particular edition (title) for more data at that level, such as a front cover image or linked contents.
  3. ^ Michael R. Page, "Introduction", The Man With the Strange Head, Miles J. Breuer, 2008, p. xvii.
  4. ^ Wonder's Child: My Life in Science Fiction by Jack Williamson, 2nd ed., 2005, pp. 61-62.
  5. ^ "Miles J. Breuer," Twentieth-Century Science-Fiction Writers, ed. Curtis C. Smith, 2nd ed., 1986, pp. 78-79.
  6. ^ "Miles J. Breuer", The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, 1993, p. 157.

External links

2016 in public domain

When a work's copyright expires, it enters the public domain. The following is a list of works that enter the public domain in 2016. Since laws vary globally, the copyright status of some works are not uniform.

Amazing Stories Quarterly

Amazing Stories Quarterly was a U.S. science fiction pulp magazine that was published between 1928 and 1934. It was launched by Hugo Gernsback as a companion to his Amazing Stories, the first science fiction magazine, which had begun publishing in April 1926. Amazing Stories had been successful enough for Gernsback to try a single issue of an Amazing Stories Annual in 1927, which had sold well, and he decided to follow it up with a quarterly magazine. The first issue of Amazing Stories Quarterly was dated Winter 1928 and carried a reprint of the 1899 version of H.G. Wells' When the Sleeper Wakes. Gernsback's policy of running a novel in each issue was popular with his readership, though the choice of Wells' novel was less so. Over the next five issues, only one more reprint appeared: Gernsback's own novel Ralph 124C 41+, in the Winter 1929 issue. Gernsback went bankrupt in early 1929, and lost control of both Amazing Stories and Amazing Stories Quarterly; his assistant, T. O'Conor Sloane, took over as editor. The magazine began to run into financial difficulties in 1932, and the schedule became irregular; the last issue was dated Fall 1934.

Authors whose work appeared in Amazing Stories Quarterly include Stanton A. Coblentz, Miles J. Breuer, A. Hyatt Verrill, and Jack Williamson. Critical opinions differ on the quality of the fiction Gernsback and Sloane printed: Brian Stableford regards several of the novels as being important early science fiction, but Everett Bleiler comments that few of the stories were of acceptable quality. Milton Wolf and Mike Ashley are more positive in their assessment; they consider the work Sloane published in the early 1930s to be some of the best in the new genre.

Big Book of Science Fiction

Big Book of Science Fiction is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Groff Conklin. It was first published in hardcover by Crown Publishers in August 1950. A later edition was issued by Bonanza Books/Crown Publishers in 1978 under the alternate title The Classic Books of Science Fiction. An abridged paperback edition containing ten of its 32 stories was published by Berkley Books in April 1957, and reprinted in June 1957 and September 1964; the reprints bore the variant title The Big Book of Science Fiction.The book collects thirty-two novellas, novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, together with an introduction by the editor. The stories were previously published from 1889-1950 in various science fiction and other magazines.

Breuer

Breuer is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Carolyn Breuer, German musician

Eric Breuer, Swiss archaeologist and historian

Hans Breuer (physicist), German physicist

Hans Breuer (politics), German mayor

Isaac Breuer, German-Jewish intellect

Jim Breuer, American comedian

Josef Breuer, physician and physiologist

Rabbi Joseph Breuer

Lanny A. Breuer, American lawyer

Lee Breuer, theatre director

Marcel Breuer, architect and furniture designer

Michel Breuer, Dutch footballer

Miles J. Breuer, science fiction writer and physician

Rabbi Mordechai Breuer, Orthodox rabbi

Mordechai Breuer (historian), Jewish historian, Bar Ilan professor emeritus

Rabbi Solomon Breuer, rabbi

Theo Breuer, German poet, essayist, editor, translator and publisher

Clare Winger Harris

Clare Winger Harris (January 18, 1891 – October 1968) was an early science fiction writer whose short stories were published during the 1920s. She is credited as the first woman to publish stories under her own name in science fiction magazines. Her stories often dealt with characters on the "borders of humanity" such as cyborgs.Harris began publishing in 1926, and soon became well liked by readers. She sold a total of eleven stories, which were collected in 1947 as Away From the Here and Now. Her gender was a surprise to Gernsback, the editor who first bought her work, as she was the first woman to publish science fiction stories under her own name. Her stories, which often feature strong female characters, have been occasionally reprinted and have received some positive critical response, including a recognition of her pioneering role as a woman writer in a male-dominated field.

Fantasia Mathematica

Fantasia Mathematica

is an anthology published in 1958 containing stories, humor, poems, etc., all on mathematical topics, compiled by Clifton Fadiman. A companion volume was published as The Mathematical Magpie (1962). The volume contains writing by authors including Robert Heinlein, Aldous Huxley, H. G. Wells, and Martin Gardner.

Gostak

Gostak is a meaningless noun that is used in the phrase "the gostak distims the doshes", which is an example of how it is possible to derive meaning from the syntax of a sentence even if the referents of the terms are entirely unknown.

The phrase was coined in 1903 by Andrew Ingraham but is best known through its quotation in 1923 by C. K. Ogden and I. A. Richards in their book The Meaning of Meaning, and has been since referred to in a number of cultural contexts.

Great Science Fiction About Doctors

Great Science Fiction About Doctors is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Groff Conklin and Noah D. Fabricant, M.D. It was first published in paperback by Collier Books in 1963, and was reprinted in 1965, 1966, and 1970. The two later collaborated on a second anthology, Great Detective Stories About Doctors.

The book collects eighteen novelettes and short stories by various authors, together with a general introduction and short introductions to each story by the editors. Several of the stories are by as well as about doctors. They were previously published from 1844-1959 in various magazines.

Great Science Fiction by Scientists

Great Science Fiction by Scientists is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Groff Conklin. It was first published in paperback by Collier Books in 1962; it was reprinted twice in that year and again in 1966, 1967, 1968, 1970 and 1978.The book collects sixteen novellas, novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors who also happened to be actual scientists, together with an introduction by the editor. The stories were previously published from 1926-1961 in various science fiction and other magazines.

Jack Williamson

John Stewart Williamson (April 29, 1908 – November 10, 2006), who wrote as Jack Williamson, was an American science fiction writer, often called the "Dean of Science Fiction" after the death of Robert Heinlein in 1988. Early in his career he sometimes used the pseudonyms Will Stewart and Nils O. Sonderlund.

List of Czech Americans

This is a list of notable Czech Americans.

Many people on this list are not ethnically Czech but rather born in Bohemian/Moravian territory, of German and/or Jewish extraction.

To be included in this list, the person must have a Wikipedia article showing they are Czech American or must have references showing they are Czech American and are notable.

New Horizons (book)

New Horizons is an anthology of science fiction stories edited by American writer August Derleth. It was released posthumously by the specialty house publisher Arkham House in a hardcover edition of 2,917 copies. While the title page gives the date of publication as 1998, the book was not actually printed and released until 1999. The book is an anthology that Derleth had planned in the early 1960s, but never published.

Science-Fiction Adventures in Dimension

Science-Fiction Adventures in Dimension is an anthology of science fiction stories edited by Groff Conklin, first published by Vanguard Press in hardcover in 1953. An abridged edition was issued by Grayson & Grayson in the UK, and an abridged paperback edition, with a different selection of stories from the original, was issued by Berkley Books; both abridgments carried unhyphenated titles.

Science Fiction Adventures in Mutation

Science Fiction Adventures in Mutation is a theme anthology of science fiction stories edited by American anthologist Groff Conklin, published in hardcover by Vanguard Press in 1955. An abridged paperback edition was issued by Berkley Books in 1965.

Soft science fiction

Soft science fiction, or soft SF, is a category of science fiction with two different definitions. It either (1) explores the "soft" sciences, and especially the social sciences (for example, anthropology, sociology, or psychology), rather than engineering or the "hard" sciences (for example, physics, astronomy, or chemistry), or (2) is not scientifically accurate. Soft science fiction of either type is often more concerned with character and speculative societies, rather than speculative science or engineering. It is the opposite of hard science fiction. The term first appeared in the late 1970s and is attributed to Australian literary scholar Peter Nicholls.

The Garden of Fear and Other Stories

The Garden of Fear and Other Stories is an anthology of fantasy and science fiction stories anonymously edited by William L. Crawford. It was published as A Crawford Publication in 1949 in an edition of 48,000 copies. The H. P. Lovecraft story first appeared in the magazine The Rainbow. The other stories originally appeared in the magazine Marvel Tales.

The Mathematical Magpie

The Mathematical Magpie is an anthology published in 1962, compiled by Clifton Fadiman as a companion volume to his Fantasia Mathematica (1958). The volume contains stories, cartoons, essays, rhymes, music, anecdotes, aphorisms, and other oddments. Authors include Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov, Mark Twain, Lewis Carroll, and many other renowned figures. A revised edition was issued in 1981 and again in 1997. Although out of print, it is recommended for undergraduate mathematics libraries by the Mathematical Association of America as part of their Basic Library List.

The Science Fiction Galaxy

The Science Fiction Galaxy is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Groff Conklin. It was first published in hardcover by Permabooks in 1950.The book collects twelve novelettes and short stories by various authors, together with an introduction by the editor. The stories were previously published from 1909-1949 in various science fiction and other magazines.

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