Mildmay Fane, 2nd Earl of Westmorland

Mildmay Fane, 2nd Earl of Westmorland KB (24 January 1602 – 12 February 1666), styled Lord le Despenser between 1624 and 1628,[1] was an English nobleman, politician, and writer.[2]


The Earl of Westmorland

2ndEarlOfWestmorland
Member of Parliament for Peterborough
In office
1621–1624
Serving with Walter FitzWilliam
MonarchJames I
Preceded byEdward Wymarke
Sir William Walter
Succeeded bySir Francis Fane
Laurence Whitaker
In office
1626–1629
Serving with Laurence Whitaker
MonarchCharles I
Preceded byLaurence Whitaker
Sir Christopher Hatton
Succeeded byNone (parliament suspended until 1640)
Member of Parliament for Kent
In office
1625–1625
Serving with Sir Albert Moreton
MonarchCharles I
Preceded bySir Nicholas Tufton
Sir Edwin Sandys
Succeeded bySir Edward Hales
Sir Edward Scot
Lord Lieutenant of Northamptonshire
In office
1660–1666
Serving with The Earl of Exeter
MonarchCharles II
Preceded byNone (English Interregnum)
Succeeded byThe Earl of Exeter
The Earl of Peterborough
Personal details
Born
Mildmay Fane

24 January 1602
Mereworth, Kent, England
Died12 February 1666 (aged 64)
NationalityEnglish
Spouse(s)Grace Thornhurst (1620–36)
Mary Vere (1638–66)
ChildrenWith Grace Thornhurst
Charles Fane, 3rd Earl of Westmorland
With Mary Vere
Lady Mary Fane
Vere Fane, 4th Earl of Westmorland
Rachael Fane
Catherine Fane
Susan Fane
Elizabeth Fane
ParentsFrancis Fane, 1st Earl of Westmorland
Mary Mildmay
Alma materEmmanuel College, Cambridge
OccupationPolitician, writer
AwardsKnight of the Bath

Life

One of seven sons of Francis Fane by his wife Mary Mildmay, granddaughter of Sir Walter Mildmay, Mildmay Fane was born in Kent and educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge (matriculated 1618).[3] He became MP for Peterborough in 1620 and for Kent in 1625. He succeeded his father as Earl of Westmorland and Lord le Despenser on 23 March 1629 [all dates new style].

A friend of Robert Herrick, he supported the Royalist party at the outbreak of the English Civil War (King Charles I had stood as godfather to Fane's eldest son in 1635). Following a brief period of imprisonment by Parliament, however, he retired to his estate at Apethorpe in Northamptonshire.

Writing

Mildmay Fane in oils
A portrait in oils of Mildmay Fane, wearing the sash of the Order of the Bath.

One hundred and thirty seven poems by Fane appeared in his self-published collection Otia Sacra in 1648—the first time a peer of England published his own verse. It was only at the end of the twentieth century that a larger body of Fane's verse was identified: some 500 poems by Fane, composed between 1621 and 1665, were published in 2001.[4] The poems survived in manuscript collections preserved at Fulbeck Hall in Lincolnshire, Houghton Library at Harvard University, and the Westmorland papers preserved at the Northamptonshire Record Office.

Fane also wrote masques and stage plays; six of these "politicized entertainments" were performed at Apethorpe during the decade of the 1640s by Fane's children and servants. For his 1641 masque Candia Restaurata, Fane designed sets and stage effects and composed some of the music used in the production. Virtue's Triumph features personifications of Ambition and Impudence, Lies and Deceits; Nobility and Learning are married and the parents of Truth. The protagonist of De Pugna Animi is Lord Mens (Mind), who is assisted by figures like Sir Ratio Prudens in resisting a revolt of the five senses.[5] Fane wrote his play The Change during his imprisonment in the Tower of London early in the Civil War. One of his plays, titled Ladrones, was known in manuscript in the 19th century and reportedly featured Sir Francis Drake, Thomas Cavendish, and Ferdinand Magellan as characters; but the MS. has been lost.[6] Fane's total extant literary output includes over 900 poems in English and Latin, and eight plays or entertainments.

Family

Fane married twice: firstly, in 1620, to Grace Thornhurst, daughter of Sir William Thornhurst of Kent, with whom he had a son and five daughters; and secondly to Mary, daughter of Horace Lord Vere of Tillsbury, who bore him a son and four daughters, one of whom was Lady Mary Fane who married firstly Francis Palmes of Ashwell, Rutland, granddaughter of Sir Guy Palmes, and was widowed with no children. She married secondly John Cecil, 4th Earl of Exeter (1628–1678), a widower, on 24 January 1670. Mildmay's first son Charles, and his second son Vere, both succeeded to their father's title in turn (since Charles Fane, 3rd Earl left no descendants).

Mildmay Fane's younger brother Sir Francis Fane married Elizabeth West, daughter of William West of Firbeck Hall, Yorkshire, and widow of John, Lord Darcy of the North. Sir Francis Fane achieved some distinction as a writer, publishing poetry as well as three dramatic plays. He was made Knight of the Bath at the Coronation of Charles I, and served as governor of Doncaster Castle during the English civil war. Rachael Fane (1613–1680), one of Mildmay Fane's seven sisters and a resident of Apethorpe, also wrote entertainments and a masque that were performed by the household. Her works survive in manuscript.[7] Another younger brother was the Royalist and MP Colonel the Hon. George Fane.

Plays and masques

  • Raguaillo d'Oceano (1640)
  • Candia Restaurata ("Candy Restored," 1641)
  • Time's Trick Upon the Cards (1642)
  • The Change (1642)
  • Virtue's Triumph (1644)
  • Don Phoebo's Triumph (1645)
  • De Pugna Animi (1650)
  • Ladrones, or the Robbers' Island (lost)

References

  1. ^ Mosley, Charles, ed. (2003). Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, Vol. III (107th ed.). Wilmington, Delaware: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd. p. 4134.
  2. ^ Gerald W. Morton, A Biography of Mildmay Fane, Second Earl of Westmorland 1601–66: The Unknown Cavalier, Lewiston/Queenston/Lampeter, Edwin Mellen, 1991.
  3. ^ "Fane, Mildmay (FN618M)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  4. ^ Tom Cain, ed., The Poems of Mildmay Fane, Second Earl of Westmorland: from the Fulbeck, Harvard, and Westmorland Manuscripts, Manchester, Manchester University Press, 2001.
  5. ^ Dale B. J. Randall, Winter Fruit: English Drama 1642–1660. Lexington, KY, University Press of Kentucky, 1995; pp. 286-8.
  6. ^ Cain, p. 27.
  7. ^ Caroline Bowden, "The Notebooks of Rachael Fane: Education or Authorship?," in: Early Modern Women's Manuscript Writing, edited by Victoria E. Burke and Jonathan Gibson; London, Ashgate, 2004; pp. 157-80.

External links

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Roger Manwood
Sir William Walter
Member of Parliament for Peterborough
1621–1624
With: Walter Fitzwilliam
Succeeded by
Francis Fane
Laurence Whitacre
Preceded by
Sir Nicholas Tufton
Sir Edwin Sandys
Member of Parliament for Kent
1625
With: Sir Albert Moreton
Succeeded by
Sir Edward Hales, 1st Baronet
Sir Edward Scott
Preceded by
Laurence Whitacre
Sir Christopher Hatton
Member of Parliament for Peterborough
1626–1629
With: Laurence Whitacre
Succeeded by
Parliament suspended until 1640
Honorary titles
English Interregnum Lord Lieutenant of Northamptonshire
jointly with The Earl of Exeter

1660–1666
Succeeded by
The Earl of Exeter
The Earl of Peterborough
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Francis Fane
Earl of Westmorland
1629–1666
Succeeded by
Charles Fane
1602 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

1648 in literature

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1648.

1666

1666 (MDCLXVI)

was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1666th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 666th year of the 2nd millennium, the 66th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1666, the Gregorian calendar was

10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. This is the first year to be designated as an Annus mirabilis, in John Dryden's 1667 poem so titled, celebrating England's failure to be beaten either by the Dutch or by fire. It is the only year to contain each Roman numeral once in descending order (1000(M)+500(D)+100(C)+50(L)+10(X)+5(V)+1(I) = 1666).

1666 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

Anthony Mildmay

Sir Anthony Mildmay (died 1617) was a country gentleman from Northamptonshire, England, who served as Member of Parliament for Wiltshire from 1584 to 1586 and as English ambassador in Paris in 1597.

Baron le Despencer

Baron le Despencer is a title that has been created several times by writ in the Peerage of England.

Charles Fane, 3rd Earl of Westmorland

Charles Fane, 3rd Earl of Westmorland (6 January 1635 – 18 September 1691), styled Lord le Despenser between 1626 and 1666, of Apethorpe Hall, Northamptonshire was a British peer and twice Member of Parliament for Peterborough.

Earl of Westmorland

Earl of Westmorland is a title that has been created twice in the Peerage of England. The title was first created in 1397 for Ralph Neville. It was forfeited in 1571 by Charles Neville, 6th Earl of Westmorland for leading the Rising of the North. It was revived in 1624 in favour of Sir Francis Fane, whose mother, Mary Neville, was a descendant of a younger son of the first Earl. The first Earl of the first creation had already become Baron Neville de Raby, and that was a subsidiary title for his successors. The current Earl holds the subsidiary title Baron Burghersh (1624).

Fane (surname)

Fane is a surname.Notable people with the surname include:

Charles Fane de Salis (1860–1942), Bishop of Taunton from 1911 to 1930

Sir Charles George Fane (1837–1909), British Admiral

Sir Edmund Douglas Veitch Fane (1837–1900), diplomat and minister plenipotentiary to Denmark

Sir Francis Fane (royalist) of Fulbeck (c. 1611–1681), supported the Royalist cause During the English Civil War

Sir Francis Fane (dramatist) of Fulbeck (d. 1691), Restoration play write

Francis Fane 1700-1759 (1700–1759), Tory MP and attorney general to the Prince of Wales

Francis Fane (soldier) (1824–1893), British Colonel who raised the Peshawar Light Horse

Francis Fane of Brympton (d. 1757), Member of Parliament

Francis Fane of Spettisbury (1752–1813), Member of Parliament

Francis William Fane (1778–1844), Rear-Admiral in the British Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars

Frederick Fane (1875–1960), Irish born cricketer, who captained England on five occasions

Sir George Fane (MP for Kent) (d. 1640), English politician

George Fane (c.1616–1663) Civil War royalist officer and member of parliament

Harriet Arbuthnot née Fane (1793–1834), was an early 19th-century English diarist, social observer and political hostess on behalf of the Tory party

Henry Fane (died 1706) (c.1650–1706), Whig Member of Parliament for Reading in 1689, 1690 and 1695 (1689–1698). Irish Privy Councillor from 1690 until his death

Henry Fane (1739–1802) of Fulbeck (1739–1802) Member of Parliament for Lyme Regis 1772–1802

Sir Henry Fane (British Army officer) (1778–1840), of Fulbeck commanded brigades during several battles during the Peninsular War, and served both as a member of Parliament and Commander-in-Chief of India

Henry Fane of Brympton (1669–1726), Bristol Privateer a great-grandson of Francis Fane, 1st Earl of Westmorland and father of Thomas Fane, 8th Earl of Westmorland

Henry Fane of Wormsley (1703–1777), one of the chief clerks of the board of treasury, one of the chief clerks to the Privy Council, and a Member of Parliament

Henry Hamlyn-Fane (1817–1868), known as Henry Fane until 1861, was a British soldier and Conservative politician.

Lt-Col Henry Sutton Fane (b. 1805), English soldier and politician

Sir John Fane (captain) captain at the battle of Poitiers 1356 who captured King John II of France

John Fane (1751–1824) (1751–1824), British Tory politician

John Fane (1775–1850) (1775–1850), MP and British Tory politician

John Fane (1804–1875) (1804–1875), Colonel in the British Army and a Conservative politician

Julian Henry Charles Fane (1827–1870) diplomatist and poet

Lady Mary Fane (1639–1681) was the daughter of Mildmay Fane, 2nd Earl of Westmorland

Mildmay Fane, 2nd Earl of Westmorland (1602–1666), English nobleman, politician, and writer

Mildmay Fane (1689–1715), English politician

Mildmay Fane (1794–1868) British General

Priscilla Fane, Countess of Westmorland (1793–1879), British linguist and artist

Sir Ralph Fane or Vane of Badsel Manor (d. 1552), English nobleman was executed at Tower Hill in 1552

Richard Ponsonby-Fane (1878–1937), a British academic, author, and Japanologist

Robert George Cecil Fane (1796–1864) British Judge

Sarah Villiers, Countess of Jersey (1785–1867), was an English noblewoman, the daughter of John Fane, 10th Earl of Westmorland and Sarah Anne Child. Inherited a share in a bank

Sir Spencer Ponsonby-Fane (1824-1915), of Brymton, diplomat, cortier and cricketer

Sybil Fane, Countess of Westmorland (1871–1910), was a socialite and member of the British aristocracy

Sir Thomas Fane (d 1589) (d. 1589), MP, convicted of treason and involvement in the Wyatt's rebellion pardoned and married to Mary Neville, Baroness le Despencer daughter of Henry Nevill, 6th Baron Bergavenny. Father of Francis Fane, 1st Earl of Westmorland

Sir Thomas Fane (Kent) (1626–1692), Member of Parliament for Maidstone

Thomas Fane (MP) (1760–1807), Member of Parliament for Lyme Regis

Vere Fane (MP) Tory MP for Petersfield and Lyme Regis

Sir Vere Bonamy Fane (1863–1924), General in the British Indian Army

Vere Fane Benett-Stanford (1840–1894), Conservative MP Shaftesbury

Violet Fane (1843–1905), a British novelist, poet and essayist of Victorian era

Walter Fane (1828–1885), a British general who raised Fane's Horse at Cawnpore in 1860

William Vere Reeve King-Fane of Fulbeck (1868–1943) OBE was a member of the Fane family, an English landowner, soldier and High Sheriff of Lincolnshiredisambiguation pagesSir Francis Fane of Fulbeck disambiguation page

Henry Fane disambiguation page

John Fane disambiguation page

Thomas Fane disambiguation page

Vere Fane disambiguation pageEnglish Viscount and Earls of WestmorlandFrancis Fane, 1st Earl of Westmorland

Mildmay Fane, 2nd Earl of Westmorland

Charles Fane, 3rd Earl of Westmorland

Vere Fane, 4th Earl of Westmorland

Vere Fane, 5th Earl of Westmorland

Thomas Fane, 6th Earl of Westmorland

John Fane, 7th Earl of Westmorland

Thomas Fane, 8th Earl of Westmorland

John Fane, 9th Earl of Westmorland

John Fane, 10th Earl of Westmorland

John Fane, 11th Earl of Westmorland

Francis Fane, 12th Earl of Westmorland

Anthony Mildmay Julian Fane, 13th Earl of Westmorland

Vere Fane, 14th Earl of Westmorland

David Fane, 15th Earl of Westmorland

Anthony David Francis Henry Fane, 16th Earl of Westmorland

Sarah Fane, Countess of WestmorlandIrish viscountViscount Fane (of Basildon in Berkshire; Loughgur in Limerick; Clare in Armagh, and parts of Devon)

Charles Fane, 1st Viscount Fane (1676–1744)

Charles Fane, 2nd Viscount Fane (after 1708–1766)

Frances Cecil, Countess of Exeter

Frances Cecil, Countess of Exeter (2 December 1630 – 2 December 1669), formerly Lady Frances Manners, was the first wife of John Cecil, 4th Earl of Exeter.

She was a daughter of John Manners, 8th Earl of Rutland, and his wife, the former Frances Montagu. The Countess of Exeter's sisters, Margaret, Elizabeth and Dorothy, all became countesses. Another, Anne, became a Viscountess.

She married the earl on 8 December 1646.

Two of their children survived infancy:

John Cecil, 5th Earl of Exeter (c. 1648–1700)

Lady Frances Cecil (1652–1694), married John Scudamore, 2nd Viscount Scudamore.The countess's portrait in miniature was painted in about 1646 (the year of her marriage) by Samuel Cooper, and is held by Burghley House.Some sources give the date of her death as 1660, but the parish register of St Martin's Church, Stamford, shows her to have been buried in December 1669. A few weeks after her death, the earl married Lady Mary Fane, daughter of Mildmay Fane, 2nd Earl of Westmorland.

Francis Fane, 1st Earl of Westmorland

Francis Fane, 1st Earl of Westmorland (1 February 1580 – 23 March 1629), styled Sir Francis Fane between 1603 and 1624 was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1601 and 1624 and then was raised to the Peerage as Earl of Westmorland.

John Cecil, 4th Earl of Exeter

John Cecil, 4th Earl of Exeter (1628 – February 1678), styled Lord Burghley from 1640 to 1643, was an English peer.

He inherited the earldom from his father David Cecil, 3rd Earl of Exeter in 1643.

He was joint Lord Lieutenant of Northamptonshire from 1660 to 1673; after 1673, he held the Lord Lieutenancy for East Northamptonshire while the Earl of Peterborough held the West. From 1660 to 1676 he was Recorder of Stamford, and in November 1660, was granted the office of Keeper of the West Hay, Bailiwick of Cliffe, Rockingham Forest.

He married Lady Frances Manners (c. 1636 – 1660 or 1669), daughter of John Manners, 8th Earl of Rutland, from which marriage there were two surviving children:

John Cecil, 5th Earl of Exeter (c. 1648–1700)

Lady Frances Cecil (d. 1694), married John Scudamore, 2nd Viscount Scudamore.After his first wife's death, he married the widow, Lady Mary Fane, daughter of the Mildmay Fane, 2nd Earl of Westmorland.

Lady Mary Fane

Lady Mary Fane (1639–1681) was the daughter of Mildmay Fane, 2nd Earl of Westmorland, who succeeded to the title in 1628 and died in 1666, and his second wife, Mary, daughter of Horace Vere, 1st Baron Vere of Tilbury, and widow of Sir Roger Townshend.

Lady Mary married firstly Francis Palmes of Ashwell, Rutland, and was widowed with no children. She married secondly John Cecil, 4th Earl of Exeter (1628–1678), a widower, on 24 January 1670. He had previously been married to Lady Frances Manners (died 1660), and had two children. Mary is buried in St Martin's Church, Stamford.

Mary Mildmay Fane, Countess of Westmorland

Mary Mildmay, or Mary Fane Countess of Westmorland (b. c.1582 - d. 9 April 1640) continued her mother Grace Mildmay's interest in physic and was a significant author of spiritual guidance and writer of letters.

Mildmay

Mildmay may refer to:

PlacesMildmay, a settlement in Islington, Greater London

Mildmay Park railway station, in Greater London

Mildmay, Ontario, CanadaPeopleAudrey Mildmay, Canadian soprano

Sir Anthony Mildmay, d.1617, MP and diplomat

Grace Mildmay née Sharington, diarist, medical practitioner, wife of Sir Anthony

Sir Henry Mildmay MP

Baron Mildmay of Flete

Francis Bingham Mildmay, 1st Baron Mildmay of Flete, Conservative politician

Anthony Bingham Mildmay, 2nd Baron Mildmay of Flete, amateur steeplechaser

Walter Mildmay, an Elizabethan Chancellor of the Exchequer

Mildmay Fane, 2nd Earl of Westmorland, politician and writer

Mildmay Fane, MP for KentSports teamsMildmay Monarchs, hockey team from Mildmay Ontario

Rachel Bourchier, Countess of Bath

Rachel Bourchier, Countess of Bath (28 January 1613 – 11 November 1680) (née Fane), the wife of Henry Bourchier, 5th Earl of Bath (1587-1654), was an English noblewoman and writer, best known for her activities during the English Civil War.

Sir Roger Townshend, 1st Baronet

Sir Roger Townshend, 1st Baronet (c.1596 – 1 January 1637), was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons in two parliaments between 1621 and 1629.

Upon Appleton House

Upon Appleton House is a poem written by Andrew Marvell for Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Lord Fairfax of Cameron. It was written in 1651, when Marvell was working as a tutor for Fairfax's daughter, Mary. An example of a country house poem, "Upon Appleton House" describes Fairfax's Nunappleton estate while also reflecting upon the political and religious concerns of the time.

Vere Fane, 4th Earl of Westmorland

Vere Fane, 4th Earl of Westmorland (13 February 1645 – 29 December 1693), styled The Honourable Vere Fane from 1644 to 1661 and Sir Vere Fane from 1661 to 1691, was a British peer and Member of Parliament for Peterborough and twice for Kent.

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