Mike Witt's perfect game

On September 30, 1984, Mike Witt of the California Angels threw a perfect game against the Texas Rangers at Arlington Stadium. It was the 11th perfect game in Major League Baseball history.[1]

Witt's perfect game came on the last day of the 1984 MLB season. As the Angels and Rangers had both been eliminated from the playoffs, only 8,375 fans attended the game. Witt was opposed by Charlie Hough of the Rangers, who allowed only one run to the Angels.[1]

Reggie Jackson, whose seventh-inning fielder's choice ground ball scored Doug DeCinces for the game's only run, was also on the winning end of Catfish Hunter's perfect game while with the Oakland Athletics in 1968, becoming the first player to play for the winning team in two perfect games.

Witt also struck out 10 batters during the game. With the win, the Angels finished .500, which they had not done since the 1982 season. Two years later, they would reach the ALCS but lose. The Rangers would have to wait ten years for their perfect game, which they did fittingly enough against the Angels. That game took place in Arlington Stadium's successor, The Ballpark in Arlington.

Mike Witt's perfect game
Arlington Stadium 1988
The game took place at Arlington Stadium.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
California Angels 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 7 0
Texas Rangers 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
DateSeptember 30, 1984
VenueArlington Stadium
CityArlington, Texas
Managers

Boxscore

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
California Angels (81–81) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 7 0
Texas Rangers (69–92) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
WP: Mike Witt (16–14)   LP: Charlie Hough (15–11)

References

  1. ^ a b http://espn.go.com/blog/los-angeles/angels/post/_/id/3202/angels-moment-no-14-mike-witts-perfect-game
1998 Major League Baseball season

The 1998 Major League Baseball season ended with the New York Yankees sweeping the San Diego Padres in the World Series, after they had won a then AL record 114 regular season games. The Yankees finished with 125 wins for the season (regular season and playoffs combined), which remains the MLB record.

The 1998 season was also marked by an expansion to 30 teams (16 in the NL, 14 in the AL), with two new teams–the Arizona Diamondbacks in the National League, and the Tampa Bay Devil Rays in the American League–added to the MLB. To keep the leagues with even numbers of teams while allowing both leagues to have a new team, the Milwaukee Brewers were moved from the American League Central Division to the National League Central Division. The Detroit Tigers were shifted from the American League East to the American League Central, while the Devil Rays were added to the American League East. The Diamondbacks were added to the National League West, making the NL have more teams than the AL for the first time.

The biggest story of the season was the historic chase of the single-season home run record held at the time by Roger Maris. Initially, the St. Louis Cardinals' Mark McGwire and Ken Griffey, Jr. of the Seattle Mariners started the season on a pace to both break Maris' record. In June, the chase was joined by the Chicago Cubs' Sammy Sosa, who broke the decades-old record of Rudy York for most home runs in a calendar month with 20 that month. Eventually, Griffey fell off the record pace, but still ended with 56 homers. Both McGwire and Sosa broke the record in September, with McGwire ultimately finishing with 70 homers to Sosa's 66. McGwire's record would last only three years, with Barry Bonds hitting 73 in 2001. The 1998 season was also the first in MLB history with four players hitting 50 or more homers, with Greg Vaughn of the San Diego Padres hitting 50. In a postscript to the record chase, both McGwire and Sosa have since been widely accused of having used performance-enhancing drugs during that period, and McGwire would admit in 2010 that he had used steroids during the record-setting season.The defending World Series champions Florida Marlins finished last in the NL East Division at 54-108, making it the first, and only, time that a team went from winning the World Series one year to finishing with 100 or more losses and last in their division the following year.

1998 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1998 throughout the world.

2013 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 2013 throughout the world.

Angel Stadium

Angel Stadium of Anaheim, originally known as Anaheim Stadium and later Edison International Field of Anaheim, is a modern-style ballpark located in Anaheim, California. Since its opening in 1966, it has served as the home ballpark of the Los Angeles Angels of Major League Baseball (MLB), and was also the home stadium to the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL) from 1980 to 1994. The stadium is often referred to by its unofficial nickname The Big A, coined by Herald Examiner Sports Editor, Bud Furillo. It is the fourth-oldest active Major League Baseball stadium, behind Fenway Park, Wrigley Field, and Dodger Stadium. It hosted the 1967, 1989, and 2010 Major League Baseball All-Star Games.Angel Stadium and its surrounding parking lot are roughly bounded by Katella Avenue to the north, the Orange Freeway to the east, Orangewood Avenue to the south, and State College Boulevard to the west. Located near the eastern boundary of the parking lot is the landmark "Big A" sign and electronic marquee, which originally served as a scoreboard support. The halo located near the top of the 230' tall, 210-ton sign is illuminated following games in which the Angels win (both at home and on the road), which gives rise to the fan expression, "Light that baby Up!"

ARTIC (Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center) servicing the Metrolink Orange County Line and Amtrak Pacific Surfliner, is located nearby on the other side of the State Route 57 and accessed through the Douglass Road gate at the northeast corner of the parking lot. The station provides convenient access to the stadium, the nearby Honda Center, and Disneyland from various communities along the route, which links San Luis Obispo, Los Angeles, and San Diego. The Anaheim Resort Transit stops at the center along with Orange County Transportation Authority buses.

Aside from professional baseball and football, Angel Stadium has hosted high school and college football games, National Football League pre-season games, the short-lived World Football League, two crusades by evangelist Billy Graham, nearly 20 consecutive annual crusades by evangelist Greg Laurie, Eid el Fitr celebrations, and concerts, and 2 to 3 AMA Supercross Championship races a year.

The stadium also houses the studios and offices of the Angels' owned and operated flagship radio station, KLAA (830 AM).

Bob Boone

Robert Raymond Boone (born November 19, 1947) is an American former catcher and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB) who was a four-time All-Star. Born in San Diego, California, Bob Boone is the son of a Major League player, the late third baseman Ray Boone, and he is the father of two Major Leaguers: former second baseman Bret Boone and former utility infielder Aaron Boone. All four family members were named All-Stars during their careers.

Greg Kosc

Gregory John Kosc (born April 27, 1949) is a former umpire in Major League Baseball who worked in the American League from 1976 to 1999. He officiated in the World Series in 1987 and 1997, and in the All-Star Game in 1981 and 1992. He also worked the American League Championship Series in 1979, 1988 and 1993, and the American League Division Series in 1996 and 1997. Kosc wore uniform number 18 when the American League umpires adopted them in 1980.

Kosc was the first base umpire for Len Barker's perfect game on May 15, 1981, and was behind the plate for Mike Witt's perfect game on September 30, 1984; he is one of only seven umpires to have worked in two perfect games. He was an umpire on September 6, 1995 when Cal Ripken Jr. broke Lou Gehrig's consecutive games played streak.He was also one of the umpires for the single-game playoff to decide the AL West title in 1995 and later on was one of those 22 umpires who submitted their resignations as part of a failed union strategy in 1999, a move which backfired badly for most of them, when Major League Baseball opted to accept the resignations. Kosc never obtained his position again after certain umpires were restored to the active list.

He is a resident of Medina, Ohio.

Jim Evans (umpire)

James Bremond Evans (born November 5, 1946) is a former umpire in Major League Baseball (MLB) who worked in the American League (AL) from 1971 to 1999, and ran a professional umpiring school from 1990 through 2012.

List of Major League Baseball no-hitters

This is a list of no-hitters in Major League Baseball history. In addition, all no-hitters that were broken up in extra innings or were in shortened games are listed, although they are not currently considered official no-hitters. (Prior to 1991, a performance in which no hits were surrendered through nine innings or in a shortened game was considered an official no-hit game.) The names of those pitchers who threw a perfect game no-hitter are italicized. For combined no-hitters by two or more pitchers on the same team, each is listed with his number of innings pitched. Games which were part of a doubleheader are noted as either the first game or second game. The most recent no-hitter was pitched by Taylor Cole and Félix Peña of the Los Angeles Angels on July 12, 2019.

An official no-hit game occurs when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings thrown by the pitcher(s). In a no-hit game, a batter may still reach base via a walk, an error, a fielder's choice, an intentional walk, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference. Also, due to these methods of reaching base, it is possible for a team to score runs without getting any hits.

While the vast majority of no-hitters are shutouts, no-hit teams have managed to score runs in their respective games a number of times. Five times a team has been no-hit and still won the game: two notable victories occurred when the Cincinnati Reds defeated the Houston Colt .45s (now called the Houston Astros) 1–0 on April 23, 1964 even though they were no-hit by Houston starter Ken Johnson, and the Detroit Tigers defeated the Baltimore Orioles 2–1 on April 30, 1967 even though they were no-hit by Baltimore starter Steve Barber and reliever Stu Miller. In another four games, the home team won despite gaining no hits through eight innings, but these are near no-hitters under the 1991 rule that nine no-hit innings must be completed in order for a no-hitter to be credited.

The pitcher who holds the record for the shortest time between no-hitters is Johnny Vander Meer, the only pitcher in history to throw no-hitters in consecutive starts, while playing for the Cincinnati Reds in 1938. Besides Vander Meer, Allie Reynolds (in 1951), Virgil Trucks (in 1952), Nolan Ryan (in 1973), and Max Scherzer (in 2015) are the only other major leaguers to throw two no-hitters in the same regular season. Jim Maloney technically threw two no-hitters in the 1965 season, but his first one ended after he allowed a home run in the top of the 11th inning. According to the rules interpretation of the time, this was considered a no-hitter. Later that season, Maloney once again took a no-hitter into extra innings, but this time he managed to preserve the no-hitter after the Reds scored in the top half of the tenth, becoming the first pitcher to throw a complete game extra inning no-hitter since Fred Toney in 1917.Roy Halladay threw two no-hitters in 2010: a perfect game during the regular season and a no-hitter in the 2010 National League Division Series. He is the only major leaguer to have thrown no-hitters in regular season and postseason play.

The first black pitcher to toss a no-hitter was Sam Jones who did it for the Chicago Cubs in 1955. The first Latin pitcher to throw one was San Francisco Giant Juan Marichal in 1963. The first Asian pitcher to throw one was Los Angeles Dodger Hideo Nomo in 1996.

Through July 12, 2019, there have been 301 no-hitters officially recognized by Major League Baseball, 258 of them in the modern era (starting in 1901, with the formation of the American League). Joe Borden's no-hitter in 1875 is also noted, but is not recognized by Major League Baseball (see note in the chart).

Marv Foley

Marvis Edwin Foley is a former Major League Baseball catcher and coach, former minor league baseball coach and manager, and current Major League catching instructor for the Colorado Rockies. In the majors, he played all or part of five seasons, between 1978 and 1984, for the Chicago White Sox and Texas Rangers. He is the only manager ever to win league championships in all three major Triple-A leagues (International League, American Association and Pacific Coast League).

Mickey Rivers

John Milton "Mickey" Rivers (born October 31, 1948) is an American former baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball from 1970 to 1984 for the California Angels, New York Yankees and Texas Rangers. As a member of the Yankees, he was part of two World Series championship teams, both wins over the Los Angeles Dodgers, in 1977 and 1978. "Mick The Quick" was generally known as a speedy leadoff hitter who made contact and was an excellent center fielder, with a below-average throwing arm.

Roy Halladay

Harry Leroy Halladay III (May 14, 1977 – November 7, 2017), known as Roy Halladay, was an American professional baseball player who pitched for the Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies between 1998 and 2013. His nickname, "Doc", was coined by Toronto Blue Jays announcer Tom Cheek, and was a reference to Wild West gunslinger Doc Holliday.

Halladay was chosen by the Blue Jays with their first selection in the 1995 MLB draft and was the 17th overall pick. He played for the team from 1998 through 2009. After being traded to Philadelphia in 2009, Halladay pitched for the Phillies from 2010 to 2013. He was known for his ability to pitch effectively deep into games and, at the time of his retirement, was the active major league leader in complete games with 67, including 20 shutouts.On May 29, 2010, Halladay pitched the 20th perfect game in major league baseball history, beating the Florida Marlins by a score of 1–0. On October 6, 2010, in his first postseason start, Halladay threw the second no-hitter in MLB postseason history (Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series being the first) against the Cincinnati Reds in Game 1 of the 2010 NLDS. This feat made Halladay the fifth pitcher in major league history (and the first since Nolan Ryan in 1973) to throw multiple no-hitters in the same calendar year (including the postseason). During the 2012 season, he became the 67th pitcher to record 2,000 career strikeouts. Halladay was also one of six pitchers in MLB history to win the Cy Young Award in both the American and National Leagues.

On November 7, 2017, Halladay died when his ICON A5 amphibious plane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Florida. The Blue Jays organization posthumously retired his number 32 on March 29, 2018. Halladay was announced as an inductee to the National Baseball Hall of Fame on January 22, 2019; he is the first posthumously-elected player since Ron Santo in 2012 and the first elected by the BBWAA since Roberto Clemente in 1973.

Tom Dunbar

Thomas Jerome Dunbar (November 24, 1959 – March 16, 2011) was a professional baseball player who played as outfielder in Major League Baseball for three seasons with the Texas Rangers from 1983 until 1985. He was 6'2", 192 pounds, and he threw and batted left-handed. The college he chose to attend was Middle Georgia College.

Dunbar was originally drafted by the Boston Red Sox in the 11th round, 286th overall, of the 1979 draft. Deciding not to sign that year, he was drafted by the Rangers in the 1st round, 25th overall, of the 1980 draft, after which he signed.

Dunbar won the 1984 Texas League batting title and played a total of 91 major league games, making his debut on September 7, 1983, at the age of 23. He hit .231 with three home runs and 18 RBI, striking out 32 times and walking 23. In the field, he committed four errors for a .929 fielding percentage, below average for an outfielder. He played his final game on July 13, 1985, though continued to play in the minors until 1991. His most notable game was most likely Mike Witt's perfect game in the 1984 season finale. He went 0 for 3 including a strikeout leading off the bottom of the ninth. He could apparently hit the knuckleball however, going 3 for 7 lifetime against Phil Niekro, one of three Hall of Famers he would face in his career. Rollie Fingers and newly elected Bert Blyleven were the others.

After retirement he worked in the Cincinnati Reds organization as a minor league coach and manager.He died at the age of 51 on March 16, 2011, in Aiken, South Carolina, while recuperating from prostate cancer surgery.

Vida Blue

Vida Rochelle Blue Jr. (born July 28, 1949) is an American former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. During a 17-year career, he pitched for the Oakland Athletics (1969–77), San Francisco Giants (1978–81; 1985–86), and Kansas City Royals (1982–83). He won the American League Cy Young Award and Most Valuable Player Award in 1971. He is a six-time All-Star, and is the first of only five pitchers in major league history to start the All-Star Game for both the American League (1971) and the National League (1978); Roger Clemens, Randy Johnson, Roy Halladay, and Max Scherzer later duplicated the feat.

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