Mike Tiernan

Michael Joseph Tiernan (January 21, 1867 – November 7, 1918), nicknamed "Silent Mike", was an American professional baseball right fielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) exclusively for the New York Giants from 1887 to 1899. Born in Trenton, New Jersey, his debut game was on April 30, 1887. His final game was played on July 31, 1899. Tiernan led the National League in home runs in 1890 and 1891, and compiled a .311 lifetime batting average. He is the Giants' all-time franchise leader in triples and stolen bases. One of the great home run hitters of the 19th century, he hit 106 of them, which ties him with Hall of Famer Dan Brouthers for fourth most among 19th century ball players.

Mike Tiernan
Mike Tiernan baseball card
Right fielder
Born: January 21, 1867
Trenton, New Jersey
Died: November 7, 1918 (aged 51)
New York City, New York
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 30, 1887, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
July 31, 1899, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.311
Hits1,838
Home runs106
Runs batted in851
Runs scored1,316
Stolen bases428
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

Achievements
Preceded by
Jimmy Ryan
Larry Twitchell
Hitting for the cycle
August 25, 1888
June 28, 1890
Succeeded by
Pete Browning
Bill Van Dyke
1887 New York Giants season

The 1887 New York Giants season was the franchise's 5th season. The team finished in fourth place in the National League with a record of 68–55, 10.5 games behind the Detroit Wolverines.

1888 New York Giants season

The 1888 New York Giants season was the franchise's 6th season.

Claiming six future Hall of Famers (Roger Connor, Mickey Welch, Buck Ewing, Tim Keefe, Jim O'Rourke, and John Montgomery Ward), the team won the National League pennant by nine games and defeated the St. Louis Browns in the "World's Championship."

Keefe led the league in several major statistical categories, including wins, winning percentage, strikeouts, and earned run average.

1888 World Series

The 1888 World Series was an end-of-the-year professional baseball season championship playoff series between the National League champion New York Giants and the old American Association champion St. Louis Browns.

The Giants won, 6 games to 4. Hall of Fame pitcher Tim Keefe went 4–0.

This was the Browns' last appearance in a championship tournament and pre-modern-era World Series, the last of their four consecutive AA pennants. The club would later join the NL in 1892 and be renamed as the St. Louis Cardinals by 1900. It would be 1926 before they would win their next league pennant.

1889 New York Giants season

The 1889 New York Giants season was the franchise's 7th season. The team finished first in the National League with a record of 83–43. They beat the Boston Beneaters by just one game. The Beaneaters won the same number of games as the Giants, but lost two more games, giving the pennant to the Giants. The Giants went on to face the American Association champion Brooklyn Bridegrooms in the 1889 World Series, winning six games to three. The series marked the very first meeting between the Giants and the team that would become the Dodgers, a rivalry that continues to this day.

1890 New York Giants season

The 1890 New York Giants season was the franchise's 8th season. The team finished in sixth place in the National League with a 63–68 record, 24 games behind the Brooklyn Bridegrooms. They also had to contend with a new crosstown rival, the New York Giants of the Players' League.

1890 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1890 throughout the world.

1891 New York Giants season

The 1891 New York Giants season was the franchise's 9th season. The team finished in third place in the National League with a 71-61 record, 13 games behind the Boston Beaneaters.

1892 New York Giants season

The 1892 New York Giants season was the franchise's 10th season. The team finished in eighth place in the National League with a 71-80 record, 30.5 games behind the Boston Beaneaters.

1893 New York Giants season

The 1893 New York Giants season was the franchise's 11th season. The team finished in fifth place in the National League with a 68-64 record, 19.5 games behind the Boston Beaneaters.

1894 New York Giants season

The 1894 New York Giants season was the franchise's 12th season. The team finished second in the National League pennant race with an 88-44 record, 3 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. After the regular season's conclusion, they participated in the first Temple Cup competition against the first-place Baltimore Orioles. The Giants won in a sweep, four games to none.

1895 New York Giants season

The 1895 New York Giants season was the franchise's 13th season. The team finished in ninth place in the National League with a 66-65 record, 21.5 games behind the Baltimore Orioles.

1896 New York Giants season

The 1896 New York Giants season was the franchise's 14th season. The team finished in seventh place in the National League with a 64-67 record, 27 games behind the Baltimore Orioles.

1897 New York Giants season

The 1897 New York Giants season was the franchise's 15th season. The team finished in third place in the National League with an 83-48 record, 9.5 games behind the Boston Beaneaters.

1899 New York Giants season

The 1899 New York Giants season was the franchise's 17th season. The team finished in tenth place in the National League with a 60-90 record, 42 games behind the Brooklyn Superbas.

List of Major League Baseball players who spent their entire career with one franchise

The following is a list of former Major League Baseball (MLB) players who played in at least ten MLB seasons and spent their entire MLB playing careers exclusively with one franchise. In most cases, this means the player only appeared with one team; there are also players whose team was relocated (e.g. the Athletics) or had a name change (e.g. the Angels) during their career. Some listed players subsequently went on to coach or manage with other teams, or may have had minor league appearances with other franchises.

As of November 2018, 178 players have accomplished this feat, of which the New York Yankees have had the most, with 25. Bid McPhee and Mike Tiernan, both of whom played exclusively in the 19th century, were the first two players to complete the feat. Brooks Robinson and Carl Yastrzemski share the distinction of the longest tenure with a single team, 23 seasons with the Baltimore Orioles and Boston Red Sox, respectively. Joe Mauer of the Minnesota Twins, who announced his retirement on November 9, 2018, is the most recent player to complete a career of at least ten seasons with one team.

List of Major League Baseball single-season triples leaders

Below is the list of 112 instances in which Major League Baseball players have hit 20 or more triples in a single season. Active players are in bold.

List of San Francisco Giants team records

The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in San Francisco, California. The Giants formed in 1883 as the New York Gothams. The club was renamed to the New York Giants in 1885. 75 years later, the franchise moved to its current day city, San Francisco. Through the 2017 season, the Giants have played 20,528 games, winning 11,015, and losing 9,513 for a winning percentage of approximately .537. This list documents the superlative records and accomplishments of team members during their tenures as Gothams or Giants.

Tiernan

Tiernan (also spelled Tirnan) is an Irish family name:

Andrew Tiernan (born 1965), English actor

Bob Tiernan, American politician

Cate Tiernan (born 1961), pen name of Gabrielle Charbonnet), American author

Fergus Tiernan (born 1982), Scottish football midfielder

Frances Christine Fisher Tiernan (1846–1920), pen name "Christian Reid"), American novelist, author

Greg Tiernan (born 1965), Irish-born-Canadian-based animator, director, voice actor

Mary Spear Nicholas Tiernan (1835–1891), American writer

Mike Tiernan (1867–1918), American professional baseball player

Robert Tiernan (1929–2014), American lawyer, politician

Tommy Tiernan (born 1969), Irish comedian, actor, writer, presenter

Walt Wilmot

Walter Robert Wilmot (October 18, 1863 – February 1, 1929) was a professional baseball player. He played all or part of 10 seasons in Major League Baseball with the Washington Nationals (1888–89), Chicago Colts (1890-95) and New York Giants (1897–98), primarily as an outfielder. Listed at 5 ft 9 in, 165 lb., Wilmot was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. He was born in Plover, Wisconsin.

While playing for the Nationals in 1889, Wilmot led the league with 19 triples and 139 games played. The following season, he tied with Oyster Burns and Mike Tiernan for the National League lead in home runs with 13, also a career-high. He also set a career best with 76 stolen bases while driving in 99 runs in 1890. On August 22, 1891, he became the first player in major league history to be walked 6 times in 1 game.

Wilmot's most productive season came in 1894, when he posted career-highs in batting average (.330), runs scored (134), hits (197), RBI (130), doubles (45) and extra-base hits (62) in 133 games.

Overall in his ten-season career, Wilmot was a .276 hitter with 58 home runs and 594 RBI in 962 games, including 727 runs, 152 doubles, 92 triples, 381 stolen bases and a .337 on-base percentage.

Wilmot died in Chicago, at the age of 65.

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