Mike Shannon

Thomas Michael Shannon (born July 15, 1939), is an American former professional baseball infielder / outfielder, who spent his entire Major League Baseball (MLB) career, playing for the St. Louis Cardinals (19621970). Shannon is currently a Cardinals radio broadcaster.

Shannon was raised in St. Louis, Missouri and was an integral part of some of the Cards’ most successful seasons, during the 1960s. He was the proprietor of Mike Shannon's Steaks and Seafood restaurant, in downtown St. Louis, until its closing, on January 30, 2016. Shannon still operates two Mike Shannon's Grill locations, in Edwardsville, IL, and at the St. Louis Lambert International Airport, which is run by his grandson, Justin VanMatre.[1]

Mike Shannon
Mikeshannon
Shannon in 1983
Third baseman / Right fielder
Born: July 15, 1939 (age 80)
St. Louis, Missouri
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 11, 1962, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
August 12, 1970, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Batting average.255
Home runs68
Runs batted in367
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Shannon was born and raised in south St. Louis at 7045 Winona Avenue. Mike was the second oldest of six children of Thomas A. Shannon and Elizabeth W. Richason Shannon. Shannon's father was a St. Louis police officer and after getting his law degree, worked in the Prosecuting Attorney's office before becoming the Prosecuting Attorney for the City of St. Louis in the early 1970s.

Mike attended grade school at Epiphany of Our Lord Catholic School, and graduated from Christian Brothers College High School in 1957. While at CBC Mike was the Missouri High School Player of the Year in both football and basketball his senior year. He is the only athlete to win both awards in the same year. He attended the University of Missouri before leaving in 1958 to begin his professional baseball career after signing with Bing Devine, GM of the St. Louis Cardinals. Shannon has commented that if football players were paid better during his era, he probably would have stayed at Missouri and sought a professional football career. He believed himself to be a better football player. His former coach Frank Broyles commented that had he stayed in school, Shannon might have won the Heisman Trophy.[2]

Playing career

Shannon began his big league career with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1962. In 1964, he became the team's regular right fielder, shifting to third base (in order to make room for the newly acquired Roger Maris) in 1967. Shannon played in three World Series for the Cardinals. He hit a game-tying two-run homer off Whitey Ford in Game 1 of the 1964 World Series against the New York Yankees, which St. Louis won 9-5.

One of his best years came in 1966, when he batted .288 in 137 games with 16 home runs and 64 RBI. He was named NL Player of the Month in July (.395, 7 HR, 23 RBI). He posted another excellent season in 1968, when he batted .266 in 156 games, with 15 home runs and 79 RBI; these numbers would in most seasons be considered average at best, but in the "Year of the Pitcher", such stats were enough to earn him seventh place in MVP voting, behind teammates Bob Gibson, Curt Flood, and Lou Brock, as well as Giants Willie McCovey and Juan Marichal, and Pete Rose of the Reds.

In Game 3 of the 1967 World Series against the Boston Red Sox, Shannon hit a key home run off Gary Bell. In Game 7 of the 1968 World Series against the Detroit Tigers, Shannon's solo home run off Mickey Lolich was the Cardinals' only run off Lolich as the Tigers clinched. Shannon also hit the last home run in the original Busch Stadium (Sportsman's Park) in 1966 and the first one for the Cardinals in the second Busch Stadium (Busch Memorial Stadium). In 1970, he contracted nephritis, a kidney disease, which ended his playing career.

Broadcasting career

HOFShannon2014
Shannon Cardinal Hall of Fame speech in 2014.
Bellcoolpapa1987
Mike Shannon interviewing James "Cool Papa" Bell in 1986.

Shannon joined the Cardinals' promotional staff in 1971; a year later he moved to the team's radio booth. For almost three decades Shannon was paired with Hall of Fame announcer Jack Buck on AM 1120 KMOX and the Cardinals Radio Network. Following Buck's death in 2002, he was named the team's lead radio voice, teaming with Joel Meyers (2002), Wayne Hagin (2003–2005), and John Rooney (2006–present). In 2006, he moved to KTRS (550) which had won broadcasting rights for the Cardinals and ownership of the station. For the 2011 season KMOX regained the rights for Cardinals broadcasting and Shannon returned to his former employer.

Shannon received a local Emmy Award for his work on Cardinal broadcasts in 1985, and was inducted into the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame in 1999.[3] He was named Missouri Sportscaster of the Year in 2002 and 2003.[4]

On Friday nights after a Cardinals home game, Shannon traditionally hosts a sports chat show from the Cardinals' home radio booth.

Shannon's signature home run call is "Here's a long one to left/center/right, get up baby, get up, get up...oh yeah!"

During the 1980s, Shannon worked as a backup analyst (behind the main analysts, Joe Garagiola and Tony Kubek) for NBC's Game of the Week telecasts (typically working with play-by-play man Jay Randolph).

Counting his tenure in the minor leagues, Shannon has spent 61 years—nearly his entire adult life—with the Cardinals in some capacity. He has also called Cardinals games longer than anyone except Buck.

On August 8, 2014 Shannon was inducted into the St.Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame.

As of the 2016 season, Shannon only calls home games for the Cardinals.[5]

References

  1. ^ Mike Shannon's restaurant downtown to close Jan. 30
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-02-09. Retrieved 2007-02-06.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-09-28. Retrieved 2007-08-20.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-03-16. Retrieved 2014-03-16.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ Hummel, Rick (January 19, 2016). "Mike Shannon no longer will broadcast Cardinals road games". stltoday.com. Retrieved April 3, 2016.

External links

Preceded by
Gaylord Perry
Major League Player of the Month
July, 1966
Succeeded by
Pete Rose
1964 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1964 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 83rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 73rd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 93–69 during the season and finished first in the National League, edging the co-runners-up Cincinnati Reds and Philadelphia Phillies by one game each on the last day of the regular-season to claim their first NL pennant since 1946. They went on to win the World Series in 7 games over the New York Yankees.

1967 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1967 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 86th season in St. Louis, Missouri, its 76th season in the National League, and its first full season at Busch Memorial Stadium. Gussie Busch hired former outfielder Stan Musial as general manager before the season. Featuring four future Hall of Famers in Lou Brock, Bob Gibson, Steve Carlton and Orlando Cepeda, "El Birdos" went 101–60 during the season and won the NL pennant by 10½ games over the San Francisco Giants. They went on to win the 1967 World Series in seven games over the Boston Red Sox.

1967 World Series

The 1967 World Series matched the St. Louis Cardinals against the Boston Red Sox in a rematch of the 1946 World Series, with the Cardinals winning in seven games for their second championship in four years and their eighth overall. The Series was played from October 4 to 12 in Fenway Park and Busch Memorial Stadium.

1968 World Series

The 1968 World Series featured the American League champion Detroit Tigers against the National League champion (and defending World Series champion) St. Louis Cardinals, with the Tigers winning in seven games for their first championship since 1945, and the third in their history.

The Tigers came back from a 3–1 deficit to win three in a row, largely on the arm of MVP Mickey Lolich, who as of 2019 remains the last pitcher to earn three complete-game victories in a single World Series. (The three World Series wins were duplicated by Randy Johnson in 2001, but Johnson started only two of his games.) In his third appearance in the Series, Lolich had to pitch after only two days' rest in the deciding Game 7, because regular-season 31-game winner Denny McLain was moved up to Game 6 – also on two days' rest. In Game 5, the Tigers' hopes for the title would have been very much in jeopardy had Bill Freehan not tagged out Lou Brock in a home plate collision, on a perfect throw from left fielder Willie Horton, when Brock elected not to slide and went in standing up.

The 1968 season was tagged "The Year of the Pitcher", and the Series featured dominant performances from Cardinals pitcher Bob Gibson, MVP of the 1964 and 1967 World Series. Gibson came into the World Series with a regular-season earned run average (ERA) of just 1.12, a modern era record, and he pitched complete games in Games 1, 4, and 7. He was the winning pitcher in Games 1 and 4. In Game 1, he threw a shutout, striking out a Series record of 17 batters, besting Sandy Koufax's 1963 record by two. The 17 strikeouts still stands as the World Series record today. In Game 4, a solo home run by Jim Northrup was the only offense the Tigers were able to muster, as Gibson struck out ten batters. In Game 7, Gibson was defeated by series MVP Lolich, allowing three runs on four straight hits in the decisive seventh inning, although the key play was a Northrup triple that was seemingly misplayed by center fielder Curt Flood and could have been the third out with no runs scoring.

The World Series saw the Cardinals lose a Game 7 for the first time in their history. The Tigers were the third team to come back from a three-games-to-one deficit to win a best-of-seven World Series, the first two being the 1925 Pirates and the 1958 Yankees. Since then, the 1979 Pirates, the 1985 Royals, and the 2016 Cubs accomplished this feat.

Detroit manager Mayo Smith received some notoriety for moving outfielder Mickey Stanley to shortstop for the 1968 World Series, which has been called one of the gutsiest coaching moves in sports history by multiple sources. Stanley, who replaced the superior fielding but much weaker hitting Ray Oyler, would make two errors in the Series, neither of which led to a run.

This was also the final World Series played prior to Major League Baseball's 1969 expansion, which coincided with the introduction of divisional play and the League Championship Series.

All seven games of NBC's TV coverage were preserved on black-and-white kinescopes by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and circulate among collectors. Games 1 and 5 have been commercially released; these broadcasts, and that of Game 7, were frequently shown on CSN (Classic Sports Network) and ESPN Classic in the 1990s and 2000s.

1969 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1969 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 88th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 78th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 87–75 during the season and finished fourth in the newly established National League East, 13 games behind the eventual NL pennant and World Series champion New York Mets.

The resurgent Chicago Cubs, featuring players such as Ernie Banks, Ron Santo, and Billy Williams and helmed by fiery manager Leo Durocher, led the newly formed NL East for much of the summer before faltering. The Cardinals put on a mid-season surge, as their famous announcer Harry Caray (in what would prove to be his final season of 25 doing Cardinals broadcasts) began singing, "The Cardinals are coming, tra-la, tra-la". However, to the surprise of both Chicago and St. Louis, the Miracle Mets would ultimately win the division, as well as the league championship and the World Series.

1970 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1970 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 89th season in St. Louis, Missouri, and the 79th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 76–86 during the season and finished fourth in the National League East, 13 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates. The season was also the first of 26 seasons for AstroTurf at Busch Memorial Stadium.

1973 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1973 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 92nd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 82nd season in the National League. The Cardinals overcame an 8-23 start to finish with an 81–81 record during the season and finished second in the National League East, a-game-and-a-half behind the NL East and eventual NL pennant winners New York Mets.

1978 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1978 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 97th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 87th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 69-93 during the season and finished fifth in the National League East, 21 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies.

1981 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 1981 season was the team's 100th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 90th season in the National League. 1981 was a season of two significant anomalies: A change in the playoff format, which created the first-ever Divisional Series with a qualification variant that existed only for that season, and the players' strike, which truncated the regular season. Despite finishing 59-43, good for the best overall record in the National League East, the strike set up the scenario where the Cardinals actually missed the playoffs. The regular season was split into halves to tally teams' records separately in each half of the season, and because the Cardinals finished in second place in each half, they did not qualify for the 1981 playoffs. Major League Baseball reverted to the previous playoff format the following season, and the Cardinals qualified for that postseason.

First baseman Keith Hernandez won a Gold Glove this year.

1984 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 1984 season was the team's 103rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 93rd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 84-78 during the season and finished 3rd in the National League East, 12½ games behind their arch-rivals, the Chicago Cubs. It was also the final season of the Columbia blue road uniforms for the Cardinals.

1995 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 1995 season was the team's 114th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 104th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 62-81 during the season and finished 4th in the National League Central division, 22½ games behind the Cincinnati Reds. It was also the team's final season under the ownership of Anheuser-Busch, who would put the team up for sale on October 25, 1995, ending a 43-season ownership reign.

Casey Award

The Casey Award has been given to the best baseball book of the year since 1983. The award was begun by Mike Shannon and W.J. Harrison, editors and co-founders of “Spitball: The Literary Baseball Magazine.”

Christian Brothers College High School

Christian Brothers College High School (CBC High School) is a Lasallian Catholic college preparatory school for young men in St. Louis, Missouri. It is located in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Saint Louis and is owned and operated by the De La Salle Christian Brothers Midwest District.

Lennon–McCartney

Lennon–McCartney (sometimes McCartney–Lennon) was the songwriting partnership between English musicians John Lennon (9 October 1940 – 8 December 1980) and Paul McCartney (born 18 June 1942) of the Beatles. It is one of the best known and is the most successful musical collaboration ever by records sold, with the Beatles selling over 600 million records worldwide as of 2004. Between 5 October 1962 and 8 May 1970, the partnership published approximately 180 jointly credited songs, of which the vast majority were recorded by the Beatles, forming the bulk of their catalogue.

Unlike many songwriting partnerships that comprise separate lyricist and composer, both Lennon and McCartney wrote words and music. Sometimes, especially early on, they would collaborate extensively when writing songs, working "eyeball to eyeball" as Lennon put it. Later, it became more common for one of the two credited authors to write all or most of a song with limited input from the other. By an agreement made before the Beatles became famous, Lennon and McCartney were credited equally with songs that either one of them wrote while their partnership lasted.

Lennon–McCartney compositions have been the subject of numerous cover versions. According to Guinness World Records, "Yesterday" has been recorded by more musicians than any other song.

List of National League Division Series broadcasters

The following is a list of the national television and radio networks and announcers who have broadcast the National League Division Series. It does not include any announcers who may have appeared on local radio broadcasts produced by the participating teams.

Spectral Sound

Spectral Sound is a record label that was originally an offshoot of the more cerebral Ghostly International, but has since gained similar notoriety thanks to successful records by Matthew Dear and other techno producers. The label began in 2000 to fulfill the more dancefloor-oriented interests of founder Samuel Valenti IV, and early singles included artists like Kenneth Graham, Osborne and James T. Cotton (aka Dabrye).

Spectral’s first full-length was Leave Luck to Heaven by Matthew Dear in 2003, which proved to be a seminal fusion of pop and minimal techno. Primarily propelled by 12" singles, Spectral has broadened its initial American focus to include international producers like Hakan Lidbo and Mike Shannon, and has been likened to contemporaries Kompakt and Perlon.

St. Louis Cardinals Radio Network

The St. Louis Cardinals Radio Network is a United States radio network that broadcasts St. Louis Cardinals baseball. The network consists of 110 stations (52 AM, 58 FM) and six FM translators in nine states (four in the Midwest and five in the South). Its flagship station is KMOX in St. Louis. Due to an earlier deal with KTRS/550, it is still a partial owner of that station although Cardinals games no longer air on KTRS (which they did for the 2006-2010 seasons).

As of the 2016 season, the play-by-play is provided by former Cardinals right fielder Mike Shannon (home games only) and John Rooney, who have been calling games for the team since 1972 and 2006 respectively. Former Cardinals pitcher Rick Horton (who also serves as a color analyst for Cardinals telecasts on Fox Sports Midwest) fills in for Shannon on road games. Mike Claiborne hosts the pre- and post-game shows and occasionally fills in on play-by-play.

Unbelievable Uglies

The Unbelievable Uglies are a rock and soul and rhythm and blues show band that formed in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota in 1963. The original members were Dave Hoffman (Winston Fink) on vocals and upright bass, frontman Dave Prentice on guitar, Gregory J. Paul on lead guitar, Bob Eveslage (Robby Jay) on vocals and keyboards, and Mike Shannon on drums.

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