Mike Oxley

Michael Garver Oxley (February 11, 1944 – January 1, 2016) was a Republican politician who served as a U.S. Representative from the 4th congressional district of Ohio.

Mike Oxley
Michael Oxley 109th Congress
Chairman of the House Financial Services Committee
In office
January 3, 2001 – January 3, 2007
SpeakerDennis Hastert
Preceded byJim Leach
Succeeded byBarney Frank
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 4th district
In office
June 25, 1981 – January 3, 2007
Preceded byTennyson Guyer
Succeeded byJim Jordan
Member of the Ohio House of Representatives
from the 82nd district
In office
January 3, 1973 – June 25, 1981
Preceded byRobert D. Schuck
Succeeded byCharlie Earl
Personal details
Born
Michael Garver Oxley

February 11, 1944
Findlay, Ohio, U.S.
DiedJanuary 1, 2016 (aged 71)
McLean, Virginia, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Patricia Ann Oxley
Alma materMiami University (B.A.)
Ohio State University College of Law (J.D.)
OccupationFBI Agent, lawyer

Background

Oxley was born in Findlay, Ohio, and received a bachelor of arts degree from Miami University in 1966 and a law degree from Ohio State University in 1969. He was a member of the Alpha chapter of the Sigma Chi fraternity at Miami.

From 1969 to 1972, Oxley worked for the Federal Bureau of Investigation and became active in the Ohio Republican Party. He served in the Ohio House of Representatives from 1973 to 1981.

Oxley was elected a U.S. Representative in 1981 in a special election to fill the vacancy caused by the death of U.S. Representative Tennyson Guyer. Oxley began serving at this post in June 1981 in the 97th Congress.[1]

He served as the chairman of the Committee on Financial Services, and was House sponsor of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002, which enacted "sweeping post-Enron regulations of publicly traded companies."[2] He was also the House sponsor of a 2006 bill that condemned media outlets that had published information on a covert financial surveillance system.[3]

Oxley announced his retirement from Congress on November 1, 2005, effective at the end of his term in 2007. He was succeeded by Republican Jim Jordan.[4]

Post-congressional career

Following his retirement from Congress, Oxley was named a nonexecutive vice chairman for NASDAQ,[5] and a partner at the law firm of BakerHostetler in Washington, D.C.[2] He later became a lobbyist for the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, the "self-regulatory body of the securities industry."[6]

Oxley, a non-smoker, was diagnosed with lung cancer around 2006, and became a member of the Lung Cancer Alliance board.[7] He died in McLean, Virginia, on January 1, 2016, from the disease.[8][9][10]

Honors

The Findlay post office is named for Oxley and the portion of US 30 within Hancock County is designated "Congressman Michael G. Oxley Memorial Highway".[11][12]

References

  1. ^ Republican squeaks by in 4th District Congressional Race
  2. ^ a b Carney, Timothy (2010-01-11) Regulate your way to riches: Michael Oxley, The Washington Examiner
  3. ^ House GOP Chastises Media
  4. ^ Files, John(2005-11-2)New York Times Ohio Republican To Retire
  5. ^ 2007-03-15 (Reuters) – Nasdaq Stock Market Inc. (NDAQ.O) on Thursday named former Congressman Michael G. Oxley, co-author of the Sarbanes-Oxley securities legislation, as nonexecutive vice chairman,
  6. ^ Carney, Timothy (2011-03-22) Regulate your way to riches: Oxley's new big client, The Washington Examiner
  7. ^ http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/rep-mike-oxley-dies-helped-create-post-enron-36050492
  8. ^ Former Rep. Mike Oxley, co-author of post-Enron law, dies at 71, PBS NewsHour
  9. ^ Ex-Rep. Mike Oxley Dies; Helped Create Post-Enron Law Archived 2016-01-22 at Archive.today, The Courier
  10. ^ http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/01/02/ohioan-was-in-congress-for-25-years.html
  11. ^ "5534.55 Congressman Michael G. Oxley Memorial Highway". Ohio Revised Code. LAW Writer. August 5, 2016. Retrieved August 28, 2017.
  12. ^ Heigl, Jana (October 24, 2016). "Poll shows Trump, Clinton tied at 45% in Ohio". Dayton Daily News. Retrieved August 28, 2017.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Tennyson Guyer
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 4th congressional district

June 25, 1981 – January 3, 2007
Succeeded by
Jim Jordan
Political offices
Preceded by
Jim Leach
Iowa
Chairman of the House Financial Services Committee
2001–2007
Succeeded by
Barney Frank
Massachusetts
105th United States Congress

The One Hundred Fifth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1997, to January 3, 1999, during the seventh and eighth years of Bill Clinton's presidency. Apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twenty-first Census of the United States in 1990. Both chambers had a Republican majority. President Clinton was impeached by the US House of Representatives of the 105th Congress.

2000 United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio

The 2000 United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2000 to elect the 19 U.S. Representatives from the state of Ohio, one from each of the state's 19 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the elections of other federal and state offices, including a presidential election and an election to the U.S. Senate

2000 United States presidential election in Ohio

The 2000 United States presidential election in Ohio took place on November 7, 2000, and was part of the 2000 United States presidential election. Voters chose 21 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Ohio was won by Governor George W. Bush by a 3.51% margin of victory. Prior to the election, most news organizations considered Ohio a swing state.

2002 United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio

The 2002 United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio were held on Tuesday, November 5, 2002 to elect the 18 U.S. Representatives from the state of Ohio, one from each of the state's 18 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the elections of other federal and state offices.

2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio

The 2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio were held on Tuesday, November 2, 2004 to elect the 18 U.S. Representatives from the state of Ohio, one from each of the state's 18 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the elections of other federal and state offices, including a presidential election and an election to the U.S. Senate.

2004 United States Senate election in Ohio

The 2004 United States Senate election in Ohio took place on November 2, 2004. It was concurrent with elections to the United States House of Representatives and the presidential election. Incumbent Republican U.S. Senator George Voinovich won re-election to a second term with the highest raw vote total in Ohio history.

Barney Frank

Barnett Frank (born March 31, 1940) is an American former politician. He served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts from 1981 to 2013. A Democrat, Frank served as chairman of the House Financial Services Committee (2007–2011) and was a leading co-sponsor of the 2010 Dodd–Frank Act, a sweeping reform of the U.S. financial industry. Frank, a resident of Newton, Massachusetts, was considered the most prominent gay politician in the United States.Born and raised in Bayonne, New Jersey, Frank graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Law School. He worked as a political aide before winning election to the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1972. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1980 with 52 percent of the vote. He was re-elected every term thereafter by wide margins. In 1987, he publicly came out as gay, becoming the first member of Congress to do so voluntarily. From 2003 until his retirement, Frank was the leading Democrat on the House Financial Services Committee, and he served as committee chairman when his party held a House majority from 2007 to 2011. In July 2012, he married his long-time partner, James Ready, becoming the first member of Congress to marry someone of the same sex while in office. Frank did not seek re-election in 2012, and retired from Congress at the end of his term in January 2013. A biography of Frank was published in 2015.

Bob Latta

Robert Edward Latta (born April 18, 1956) is the U.S. Representative for Ohio's 5th congressional district, serving since 2007. He is a member of the Republican Party. The district includes many of Toledo's suburbs and includes the cities of Findlay, Bowling Green, and Defiance.

Charlie Earl

Charles R. "Charlie" Earl (born June 6, 1946) is an American politician and former member of the Ohio House of Representatives 80th district from 1981 to 1984 when he declined to seek reelection. A member of the Libertarian Party, he received enough signatures to obtain ballot access and become a candidate for Governor of Ohio in the 2014 election.

Jim Jordan (American politician)

James Daniel Jordan (born February 17, 1964) is the U.S. Representative for Ohio's 4th congressional district, serving since 2007, as well as the current Ranking Member of the House Oversight Committee. He is a member of the Republican Party, and a founding member of the Freedom Caucus. The district is located in the north-central and western portions of the state and includes Lima, Tiffin, and Elyria.

In 2018, he announced that he would run for the House Speaker position that will be vacant upon Paul Ryan's retirement in January 2019; however, the Democratic party took the majority in the U.S. House of Representatives that year. After the election, Jordan campaigned for House Minority Leader, but lost his bid to California Republican Kevin McCarthy in a 159–43 vote.

Jim Leach

James Albert Smith Leach (born October 15, 1942) is an American academic and former politician. He served as ninth Chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities from 2009 to 2013 and was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Iowa (1977–2007).

Leach was the John L. Weinberg Visiting Professor of Public and International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University. He also served as the interim director of the Institute of Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University from September 17, 2007, to September 1, 2008, when Bill Purcell was appointed permanent director.

Previously, Leach served 30 years (1977–2007) as a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Iowa's 2nd congressional district (numbered as the 1st District from 1977 to 2003). In Congress, Leach chaired the House Committee on Banking and Financial Services (1995–2001) and was a senior member of the House Committee on International Relations, serving as Chair of the Committee’s Subcommittee on Asian and Pacific Affairs (2001–2006). He also founded and served as co-chair of the Congressional Humanities Caucus. He lost his 2006 re-election bid to Democrat Dave Loebsack. Leach sponsored the 1999 Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act, a notable piece of banking legislation of the 20th century.

Mary Lundby

Mary Adelaide Lundby (February 2, 1948 – January 17, 2009) was a state Senator from the Iowa's 18th District. She served in the Iowa Senate from 1995 to 2009, serving as Minority Leader from 2006 to 2007 and as Co-Majority Leader in 2006. She also served in the Iowa House of Representatives from 1987 to 1995, serving as Speaker pro Tempore from 1992 to 1994. Prior to her election to the Iowa House, Lundby had served as the co-chair of the Linn County Republican party, as a member of the Linn County Republican Central Committee, and as staff assistant to then-senator Roger Jepsen. She graduated from Upper Iowa University, majoring in Political Science and History.Lundby served on several committees in the Iowa Senate - the Government Oversight committee; the Natural Resources and Environment committee; and the Rules and Administration committee.

Lundby was re-elected in 2004 with 20,686 votes (60%), defeating Democratic opponent Lorna Richards. Lundby didn't run for re-election in 2008, opting to run for Linn County supervisor instead. In June 2008, Lundby withdrew from the supervisor race, as her cancer had returned.Lundby died on January 17, 2009 after a three-year battle with cervical cancer.Her son, Daniel Lundby, was elected to the Iowa House of Representatives in 2012 as a Democrat.

Metal Mickey

Metal Mickey is a fictional five-foot-tall robot, as well as the name of a spin-off television show starring the same character. The robot character was created, controlled and voiced by Johnny Edward.

The character of Metal Mickey first appeared on British television in the ITV children's magazine show The Saturday Banana, produced by Southern Television in 1978. Humphrey Barclay saw Mickey on Jimmy Savile's 'Jim'll Fix It' television show. Seeing the children chatting in the marketplace with the friendly robot, this led to the creation of the Metal Mickey television show. Within a month the pilot had been video-taped and shortly after this the series went live with its first six episodes. 41 episodes were made in total, broadcast over three separate seasons between September 1980 and January 1983. The show attracted viewing figures of around 12 million at its peak. Micky Dolenz, formerly of The Monkees pop group, was brought in to produce and direct the series along with Nic Phillips and David Crossman.

Ohio's 4th congressional district

Ohio's 4th congressional district is represented by Republican Jim Jordan. As part of the 2010 redistricting process, it was redrawn from the previous district to stretch from Lima, to include the northwestern suburbs of Columbus, up to Tiffin and Elyria on the shores of Lake Erie.

From 2002 to 2012 the district included the counties of Allen, Auglaize, Champaign, Hancock, Hardin, Logan, Marion, Morrow, Richland, Shelby, and part of Wyandot. The largest cities in the district include Lima, Marion, and Tiffin.

Poet's Pub

Poet's Pub is a 1949 British comedy film directed by Frederick Wilson and based on the 1929 novel by Eric Linklater. The film was one of four of David Rawnsley's Aquila Films that used his proposed "independent frame" technique. It was made at Pinewood Studios.

Richard Ditto

Richard Ditto is a former member of the Ohio Senate, serving from 1979 to 1980. He represented the 12th District which encompassed much of West-Central Ohio. He also worked as a representative for Congressman Mike Oxley for many years.

Tennyson Guyer

Tennyson Guyer (November 29, 1912 – April 12, 1981) was a member of the United States House of Representatives. He was a Republican from Ohio.

Born in Findlay, Ohio, Guyer was educated in the public schools of Findlay, and performed at a young age with the Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus. He received a B.S. from Findlay College in 1934, and afterwards became an ordained minister. Guyer served as mayor of Celina, Ohio, from 1940 to 1944, and later became a member of the state central committee from 1954 to 1966.

Guyer was the public affairs director for Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. in Findlay from 1950 to 1972, and was a member of the Ohio State Senate from 1959 to 1972. He was also a delegate to the Ohio State Republican conventions each year from 1950 to 1957, and was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1956.

He was elected as a Republican to the Ninety-third and to the four succeeding Congresses, serving Ohio's District 4 in the United States House of Representatives, and served from January 3, 1973, until his death from a heart attack on April 12, 1981, in Alexandria, Virginia. While serving as Congressman in 1979, he led the Cocaine Task Force, committed to curbing the drug's use in the US. He was interred in Maple Grove Cemetery in his hometown of Findlay, Ohio.

United States House Committee on Financial Services

The United States House Committee on Financial Services, also referred to as the House Banking Committee and formerly known as the Committee on Banking and Currency, is the committee of the United States House of Representatives that oversees the entire financial services industry, including the securities, insurance, banking and housing industries. The Financial Services Committee also oversees the work of the Federal Reserve, the United States Department of the Treasury, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and other financial services regulators. It is currently chaired by Democrat Maxine Waters from California. Waters was elected as chair of the committee, and assumed office on January 3, 2019.

United States congressional delegations from Ohio

These are tables of congressional delegations from Ohio to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

Members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Ohio's 4th congressional district
Acts modified
People
Government
organizations
Non-government
organizations

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