Mike Krzyzewski

Michael William Krzyzewski (/ʃɪˈʒɛfski/ shih-ZHEF-skee;[2] nicknamed "Coach K"; born February 13, 1947) is an American college basketball coach and former player. Since 1980, he has served as the head men's basketball coach at Duke University, where he has led the Blue Devils to five NCAA Championships, 12 Final Fours, 12 ACC regular season titles, and 15 ACC Tournament championships. Among men's college basketball coaches, only UCLA's John Wooden has won more NCAA Championships with a total of 10. Krzyzewski has the most wins of any coach in college basketball history.

Krzyzewski has also coached the United States men's national basketball team, which he has led to three gold medals at the 2008 Summer Olympics, 2012 Summer Olympics, and 2016 Summer Olympics. He served as the head coach of the American team that won gold medals at the 2010 and the 2014 FIBA World Cup. He was also an assistant coach for the 1992 "Dream Team".

Krzyzewski was a point guard at Army from 1966 to 1969 under coach Bob Knight. From 1975 to 1980, he was the head basketball coach for his alma mater.[3] He is a two-time inductee into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, in 2001 for his individual coaching career and in 2010 as part of the collective induction of the "Dream Team".[4] He was inducted into the College Basketball Hall of Fame in 2006, and the United States Olympic Hall of Fame in 2009 (with the "Dream Team").[4]

On November 15, 2011, Krzyzewski led Duke to a 74–69 victory over Michigan State at Madison Square Garden to become the coach with the most wins in NCAA Division I men's basketball history. Krzyzewski's 903rd victory set a new record, breaking that held by his former coach, Bob Knight. On January 25, 2015, Duke defeated St. John's, 77–68, again at Madison Square Garden, as Krzyzewski became the first Division I men's basketball coach to reach 1,000 wins.[5]

Mike Krzyzewski
Coach K speaking at West Point, 27 Apr 2010
Krzyzewski Speaking at West Point in 2011
Current position
TitleHead coach
TeamDuke
ConferenceAtlantic Coast Conference
Record1,059–285
Annual salary$7.04 million[1]
Biographical details
BornFebruary 13, 1947 (age 72)
Chicago, Illinois
Playing career
1966–1969Army
Position(s)Point guard / Shooting guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1974–1975Indiana (assistant)
1975–1980Army
1980–presentDuke
Head coaching record
Overall1,132–344
Tournaments97–30 (NCAA Division I)
2–2 (NIT)
63–21 (ACC)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Awards
Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2001 (profile)
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006

Early years and playing career

Coach-k-knight
Krzyzewski with coach Bob Knight

Krzyzewski was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Polish American, Catholic parents Emily M. (née Pituch) and William Krzyzewski.[6][7]

Raised as a Catholic, Krzyzewski attended St. Helen Catholic School in Ukrainian Village, Chicago and,[8] later, Archbishop Weber High School in Chicago, a Catholic prep school for boys.[9] He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1969, and played basketball under Bob Knight while training to become an officer in the United States Army. He was captain of the Army basketball team in his senior season, 1968–69, leading his team to the National Invitation Tournament (NIT) at Madison Square Garden in New York City, where West Point finished fourth in the tournament.

From 1969 to 1974, Krzyzewski served as an officer in the United States Army and directed service teams for three years. In 2005, he was presented West Point's Distinguished Graduate Award.[10]

Coaching career

Indiana and Army

He was discharged from active duty in 1974 with the rank of captain,[11] and started his coaching career as an assistant on Knight's staff with the Indiana Hoosiers during their historic 1974–75 season. After one year with Indiana, Krzyzewski returned to West Point as head coach of the Army Cadets. He led the Cadets to a 73–59 record and one NIT berth in five seasons.

Duke

20131203 Mike Krzyzewski
Krzyzewski coaching during a 2013 game
Coach K hugs Bob Knight
Krzyzewski embraces Bob Knight after his 903rd win

On March 18, 1980, Krzyzewski was named the head coach at Duke University after five seasons at Army.[12] After a few rebuilding seasons, he and the Blue Devils became a fixture on the national basketball scene with 35 NCAA Tournament berths in the past 36 years and 24 consecutive from 1996 to 2019, which is the second-longest current streak of tournament appearances behind Kansas, which has appeared in the tournament in 30 consecutive seasons. Overall, he has taken his program to postseason play in 36 of his 39 years at Duke and is the most winning active coach in men's NCAA Tournament play with a 94–29 record for a .764 winning percentage. His Duke teams have won 15 ACC Championships, been to 12 Final Fours, and won five NCAA tournament National Championships.

On February 13, 2010, Krzyzewski coached in his 1,000th game as the Duke head coach. On March 20, 2011, Krzyzewski won his 900th game, becoming the second of three Division I men's basketball coaches to reach 900 basketball wins, the other two being Jim Boeheim at Syracuse and his head coach at Army, Bob Knight.[13] On November 15, 2011, Krzyzewski got his 903rd win passing Knight's record for most Division I wins. In an interview of both men on ESPN the previous night, Krzyzewski discussed the leadership skills he learned from Knight and the United States Military Academy. Knight credited Krzyzewski's understanding of himself and his players as keys to his success over the years.[14]

On March 20, 2011, Krzyzewski won his 900th game with the Duke Blue Devils, making him the second head coach to win 900 games with one NCAA Division I men's basketball program.[15]

On January 25, 2015, Krzyzewski won his 1,000th game, when Duke defeated St. John's in Madison Square Garden. He is the first men's coach to win 1,000 NCAA Division I basketball games.

On April 6, 2015, Krzyzewski won his 5th NCAA championship, when Duke defeated Wisconsin in the title game.

Winning against Yale in the 2016 NCAA tournament on March 19, Krzyzewski became the all-time winningest coach in the NCAA Division I tournament with 90 total wins.

On November 11, 2017, Krzyzewski won his 1,000th game with the Duke Blue Devils, making him the first head coach to win 1,000 games with one NCAA Division I men's basketball program.[n 1]

On March 17, 2018, Krzyzewski won his 1,099th game in his career, passing Pat Summitt for most wins by a Division I coach, male or female.[16]

On February 16, 2019, Krzyzewski won his 1,123rd game to become the all-time winningest coach in college basketball history at any level (men's or women's), passing Harry Statham of Division II McKendree University.

National team

Krzyzewski has won three consecutive gold medals in the Olympics among several appearances as head coach of the USA men's national team. His other results include winning a silver medal at the 1987 World University Games, a bronze medal at the 1990 FIBA World Championship, a silver medal at the 1990 Goodwill Games, a bronze medal at the 2006 FIBA World Championship, and gold medals at the 2007 FIBA Americas Championship, the 2010 FIBA World Championship, and the 2014 FIBA World Cup.

He was also an assistant coach to the USA teams which won gold medals at the 1984 and 1992 Olympics as well as the 1979 Pan American Games Team and 1992 Tournament of the Americas.

In 2005, he was appointed coach of the national team through the Beijing Olympics. In the 2006 FIBA World Championship, the USA won the bronze medal after losing in the semifinals to Greece and then beating defending Olympic gold medalist Argentina for third place.

On August 24, 2008, Krzyzewski's U.S. team won the gold medal at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. "The Redeem Team" finished the tournament with a perfect 8–0 record. He coached the U.S. team for the 2010 FIBA World Championship and led Team USA to a perfect 9–0 record, defeating host Turkey in the gold medal game, 81–64. His team won a second Olympic gold in London, defeating runners-up Spain, 107–100. Krzyzewski has amassed a total record of 75–1 (.987) as head coach of the USA National Team.[17]

In February 2013, Krzyzewski initially stepped down after seven years of coaching the national team,[18] but Team USA in May announced that he would return as head coach from 2013 through 2016.[19]

NBA coaching offers

Duke2001PresidentBush
President George W. Bush congratulating Mike Krzyzewski and the 2001 NCAA champions at the White House

During his long tenure at Duke, Krzyzewski has been given the opportunity to coach in the NBA at least five times. The first time came after the 1990 season when he led the Blue Devils to their third straight Final Four appearance. The Boston Celtics offered a coaching position to Krzyzewski, but he soon declined their offer. The next season, Krzyzewski proceeded to lead the Blue Devils to the first of two straight national championships. In 1994, he was pursued by the Portland Trail Blazers, but again he chose to stay with Duke. In 2004, Krzyzewski was also interviewed by the Los Angeles Lakers following the departure of high-profile coach Phil Jackson. He was given a formal offer from Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak, reportedly for five years, $40 million and part ownership, but again turned down the NBA. In 2010, the New Jersey Nets were reportedly willing to pay Krzyzewski between $12 million and $15 million per season to coach the Nets. Krzyzewski again declined the offer and stayed at Duke.[20] In 2011, Krzyzewski was offered the vacant coaching position for the Minnesota Timberwolves, but he again declined the offer and chose to stay at Duke.[21]

Awards and honors

Family and charity

Krzyzewski married his wife, Carol "Mickie" Marsh, in the Catholic chapel at West Point on the day of his graduation in 1969. They have three daughters and nine grandchildren.[28]

Krzyzewski and his family founded the Emily Krzyzewski Center, a non-profit organization in Durham, which was established in 2006 and named in honor of Krzyzewski's mother. The mission is to inspire students from kindergarten to high school to dream big, act with character and purpose, and reach their potential as leaders in their community. The Center's K to College Model serves academically focused students in out-of-school programming designed to help them achieve in school, gain entry to college, and break the cycle of poverty in their families. Krzyzewski and his wife, Mickie, have also been active for years in fundraising and support for the Duke Children's Hospital, Children's Miracle Network, the V Foundation for Cancer Research.[9] In all of those entities they have both served as chairs and/or led major fundraising efforts. In addition, the Krzyzewskis have been major donors to Duke University in supporting a number of areas, including establishing scholarship endowments for students in North and South Carolina as well as a Duke student-athlete every year. He also serves on the board of advisors of the Code of Support Foundation, a nonprofit military services organization.[29]

In 2012, Krzyzewski received the U.S. Basketball Writers Association's Wayman Tisdale Humanitarian Award honoring his civic service and charitable efforts in making a significant positive impact on society.[30]

Head coaching record

College

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Army Cadets (NCAA Division I independent) (1975–1980)
1975–76 Army 11–14
1976–77 Army 20–8
1977–78 Army 19–9 NIT First Round
1978–79 Army 14–11
1979–80 Army 9–17
Army: 73–59 (.553)
Duke Blue Devils (Atlantic Coast Conference) (1980–present)
1980–81 Duke 17–13 6–8 T–5th NIT Quarterfinal
1981–82 Duke 10–17 4–10 T–6th
1982–83 Duke 11–17 3–11 7th
1983–84 Duke 24–10 7–7 T–3rd NCAA Division I Round of 32
1984–85 Duke 23–8 8–6 T–4th NCAA Division I Round of 32
1985–86 Duke 37–3 12–2 1st NCAA Division I Runner-up
1986–87 Duke 24–9 9–5 3rd NCAA Division I Sweet 16
1987–88 Duke 28–7 9–5 3rd NCAA Division I Final Four
1988–89 Duke 28–8 9–5 T–2nd NCAA Division I Final Four
1989–90 Duke 29–9 9–5 2nd NCAA Division I Runner-up
1990–91 Duke 32–7 11–3 1st NCAA Division I Champion
1991–92 Duke 34–2 14–2 1st NCAA Division I Champion
1992–93 Duke 24–8 10–6 T–3rd NCAA Division I Round of 32
1993–94 Duke 28–6 12–4 1st NCAA Division I Runner-up
1994–95 Duke 9–3[n 2] 0–1[n 2] [n 2]
1995–96 Duke 18–13 8–8 T–4th NCAA Division I Round of 64
1996–97 Duke 24–9 12–4 1st NCAA Division I Round of 32
1997–98 Duke 32–4 15–1 1st NCAA Division I Elite Eight
1998–99 Duke 37–2 16–0 1st NCAA Division I Runner-up
1999–2000 Duke 29–5 15–1 1st NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2000–01 Duke 35–4 13–3 T–1st NCAA Division I Champion
2001–02 Duke 31–4 13–3 2nd NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2002–03 Duke 26–7 11–5 T–2nd NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2003–04 Duke 31–6 13–3 1st NCAA Division I Final Four
2004–05 Duke 27–6 11–5 3rd NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2005–06 Duke 32–4 14–2 1st NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2006–07 Duke 22–11 8–8 6th NCAA Division I Round of 64
2007–08 Duke 28–6 13–3 2nd NCAA Division I Round of 32
2008–09 Duke 30–7 11–5 T–2nd NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2009–10 Duke 35–5 13–3 T–1st NCAA Division I Champion
2010–11 Duke 32–5 13–3 2nd NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2011–12 Duke 27–7 13–3 2nd NCAA Division I Round of 64
2012–13 Duke 30–6 14–4 2nd NCAA Division I Elite Eight
2013–14 Duke 26–9 13–5 T–3rd NCAA Division I Round of 64
2014–15 Duke 35–4 15–3 2nd NCAA Division I Champion
2015–16 Duke 25–11 11–7 T–5th NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2016–17 Duke 28–9 11–7 T–5th NCAA Division I Round of 32
2017–18 Duke 29–8 13–5 2nd NCAA Division I Elite Eight
2018–19 Duke 32–6 14–4 3rd NCAA Division I Elite Eight
Duke: 1,059–285 (.788) 426–175 (.709)
Total: 1,132–344 (.767)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

[31]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ While Jim Boeheim achieved the mark in terms of actual games with Syracuse University on February 4, 2017, Syracuse and Boeheim under NCAA sanctions in 2015 were permanently vacated 101 wins, resulting in Kryzewski statistically becoming the first ever.
  2. ^ a b c Krzyzewski coached only the first 12 games of season before leaving the team for back surgery and to recover from exhaustion. Pete Gaudet took over as interim head coach and compiled a record of 4–15 with a mark of 2–13 in conference play. Duke finished the season with a record of 13–18 overall and in ninth place in the ACC at 2–14. Duke and the NCAA credit the first 12 games of the season to Krzyzewski and the final 19 games to Gaudet.

References

  1. ^ "NCAA Salaries NCAAB Coaches". sports.usatoday.com. USA Today. April 2, 2019. Retrieved April 2, 2019.
  2. ^ "Duke's Coach K talks about leadership" on YouTube
  3. ^ Coach K: Duke Basketball Archived March 20, 2008, at the Wayback Machine. Accessed on February 18, 2008.
  4. ^ a b The Dream Team – Hoop Hall.com Archived August 18, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ Phillips, Scott (January 25, 2015). "Coach K earns career win No. 1,000 in No. 5 Duke's win over St. John's". NBC Sports. Retrieved January 25, 2015.
  6. ^ HighBeam
  7. ^ "Krzyzewski Receives 2007 Ellis Island Family Heritage Award – Duke University Blue Devils | Official Athletics Site". GoDuke.com. Retrieved August 4, 2012.
  8. ^ "Coach K: From Ukrainian Village to March Madness". Archived from the original on April 2, 2013. Retrieved November 17, 2013.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  9. ^ a b Susan Hines-Brigger, "Mike Krzyzewski: Life Beyond the Rim" Archived February 23, 2013, at Archive.today, St. Anthony Messenger, March 2006.
  10. ^ "2005 Distinguished Graduate Award". West Point Association of Graduates. Archived from the original on August 8, 2011. Retrieved June 5, 2009.
  11. ^ List=c0aec4bd%2D0c70%2D408a%2D9c32%2D729643e9a3d6&View=08517343%2D5995%2D4dd2%2Db894%2Dff5e244e0d30&ID=21 USMA.edu – Mike Krzyzewski]
  12. ^ "Duke Names Krzyzewski". news.google.com. Associated Press. March 19, 1980. Retrieved April 4, 2015.
  13. ^ "Duke-Michigan Rivalry Renewed With Same Result". New York Times. March 20, 2011.
  14. ^ Spencer, Sheldon (November 15, 2011). "Coach K, Knight reflect as Duke coach nears career victory No. 903". Front Row. ESPN. Retrieved November 15, 2011.
  15. ^ "Duke flushes Florida State to give Coach K his 900th school win". The Associated Press. January 25, 2014.
  16. ^ http://coachk.com/coach-k-news/coach-k-surpasses-pat-summitt-as-winningest-division-i-coach/
  17. ^ Coach K exits with a golden legacy of greatness. Kansas City Star, August 12, 2012.
  18. ^ "Mike Krzyzewski: 'It's been an honor'". ESPN. February 26, 2013. Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  19. ^ "2013 USA Basketball Men's National Team Mini-Camp" (PDF). USA Basketball. p. 6. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 15, 2014.
  20. ^ Tjarks, Jonathan (March 12, 2012). "NBA News, Rumors, NCAA Basketball, Euroleague". RealGM. Archived from the original on July 10, 2010. Retrieved August 4, 2012.
  21. ^ Lawrence, Mitch (June 25, 2011). "Timberwolves GM wanted to lure Duke's Mike Krzyzewski to Minnesota to coach Ricky Rubio project". NY Daily News. Retrieved July 23, 2018.
  22. ^ ""Coach K" Headlines Army Hall Of Fame Class Of 2009". GoArmySports.om. Retrieved September 16, 2009.
  23. ^ "Six receive Krzyzewski Character through sports award" (PDF). Pointer View. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 20, 2011. Retrieved September 16, 2009.
  24. ^ "Alabama football coach Nick Saban coming to Daphne to accept Amos Alonzo Stagg Coach of the Year Award | al.com". Blog.al.com. Retrieved August 4, 2012.
  25. ^ "Amos Alonzo Stagg Coaching Award". ASAMA – The American Sport Art Museum and Archives. Archived from the original on February 1, 2014. Retrieved October 6, 2012.
  26. ^ Coach K – Polish Sports HOF.com Archived October 21, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  27. ^ Michael Krzyzewski on the Lincoln Academy site, 2014
  28. ^ Alexander Wolff, "Blue Angel: Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski's divine spirit and working-class ethics have forged an exemplary college basketball program", Sports Illustrated, March 16, 1992.
  29. ^ "Code of Support Foundation advisory board". codeofsupportfoundation.org. Retrieved June 5, 2017.
  30. ^ "Coach K Receives Humanitarian Award". CoachK.com. Retrieved May 17, 2017.
  31. ^ "2006–07 ACC Men's Basketball Media Guide" (PDF) (Press release). theACC.com. Retrieved March 22, 2008.

External links

1981–82 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 1981–82 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The team's head coach was Mike Krzyzewski and the team finished the season with an overall record of 10–17 and did not qualify for the NCAA tournament.

1982–83 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 1982-83 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski and the team finished the season with an overall record of 11-17 and did not qualify for the NCAA tournament.

1983–84 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 1983-84 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski and the team finished the season with an overall record of 24-10.

1986–87 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 1986–87 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski and the team finished the season with an overall record of 24–9.

1988–89 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 1988–89 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

1989–90 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 1989–90 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

1994–95 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 1994–95 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University in the 1994-95 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The season lives in Duke Blue Devil infamy, as head coach Mike Krzyzewski, was forced to leave the team after twelve games while seeking treatment for an injured back and exhaustion.

Assistant Pete Gaudet would finish the rest of the Blue Devils' disappointing season with an overall record of 13–18, marking the first time since the 1982–83 season that they failed to finish above .500, won fewer than twenty games, and missed the NCAA tournament. The eighteen losses still stand as the most ever in a single season by a Duke team. This is also the last time Duke has failed to make a tournament of any kind as of 2019.

1996–97 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 1996–97 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

1997–98 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 1997–98 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

1999–2000 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 1999–2000 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

2001–02 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 2001–02 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

2002–03 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 2002–03 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University in the 2002–03 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski and the team finished the season with an overall record of 26–7.

2003–04 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 2003–04 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski, who served for his 24th year at Duke. The team played its home games in Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

2019–20 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team

The 2019–20 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represents Duke University during the 2019–20 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. They are coached by 40th-year head coach, Mike Krzyzewski. The Blue Devils play their home games at Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Coach of the Year

The Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Coach of the Year is a basketball award given to head coaches in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The award is granted to the head coach voted to be the most successful that season by members of the Atlantic Coast Sports Media Association, and since the 2012–13 season has also been awarded in separate voting by the league's coaches. The award was first given following the 1953–54 season, the first year of the conference's existence, to Everett Case of NC State. The first winner of the coaches' award was Jim Larrañaga of Miami (FL)a in 2013.Dean Smith of North Carolina has won the most awards with eight. Thirteen other coaches have won the award more than once. Five former ACC Coaches of the Year have been inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as coaches; Mike Krzyzewski (inducted 2001) of Duke and Roy Williams (inducted 2007) of North Carolina are the only two active coaches who are already members.

Fourteen coaches have won the award in the same season that they have also won a National Coach of the Year award; of those, only Krzyzewski and Smith have achieved the feat three times. Four coaches have won during the same season that they have coached a team that won the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship: Frank McGuire, Norm Sloan, Dean Smith, and Gary Williams. North Carolina has the most ACC Coach of the Year awards with 12, while its in-state rival, Duke, is second with 10. Frank McGuire is the only head coach to win the award at two different schools (North Carolina and South Carolina). Each of the original 1953 ACC members have had at least one of their coaches win the award. Among schools that joined the ACC before 2013, Boston College is the only one that has never had a winning coach. Thirty-one different coaches from twelve schools have received the award.

Duke Blue Devils men's basketball

The Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represents Duke University in NCAA Division I college basketball and competes in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The team is fourth all-time in wins of any NCAA men's basketball program, and is coached by Mike Krzyzewski.

Duke has won 5 NCAA Championships (tied with Indiana for fourth all-time behind UCLA, Kentucky and North Carolina) and appeared in 11 Championship Games (third all-time) and 16 Final Fours (fourth all-time behind North Carolina, UCLA, and Kentucky), and has an NCAA-best .755 NCAA tournament winning percentage. Eleven Duke players have been named the National Player of the Year, and 71 players have been selected in the NBA Draft. Additionally, Duke has 36 players named All-Americans (chosen 60 times) and 14 Academic All-Americans. Duke has been the Atlantic Coast Conference Champions a record 21 times, and also lays claim to 19 ACC regular season titles. Prior to joining the ACC, Duke won the Southern Conference championships five times. Duke has also finished the season ranked No. 1 in the AP poll seven times and is the all-time leader in total weeks ranked as the number one team in the nation by the AP with 135 weeks. Additionally, the Blue Devils have the second longest streak in the AP Top 25 in history with 200 consecutive appearances from 1996 to 2007, trailing only UCLA's 221 consecutive polls from 1966 to 1980.

List of Duke Blue Devils men's basketball head coaches

The following is a list of Duke Blue Devils men's basketball head coaches. The Blue Devils have had 20 coaches in their 110-season history. The team is currently coached by Mike Krzyzewski.

*Denotes interim head coach

List of Duke Blue Devils men's basketball seasons

This is a list of the seasons completed by the Duke Blue Devils men's basketball.

Pete Gaudet

Pete Gaudet is an American college basketball coach. He played varsity basketball for Iona Prep in 1959 and 1960 before going to Boston University, where he graduated in 1966.

He began his collegiate coaching career as an assistant to Mike Krzyzewski at Army. When Krzyzewski left for Duke in 1980, Gaudet was named his successor as head coach.

Men's basketball head coaches of the Atlantic Coast Conference

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