Mike Hawthorn

John Michael Hawthorn (10 April 1929 – 22 January 1959) was a British racing driver. He became the United Kingdom's first Formula One World Champion driver in 1958, whereupon he announced his retirement, having been profoundly affected by the death of his teammate and friend Peter Collins two months earlier in the 1958 German Grand Prix. Hawthorn also won the 1955 24 Hours of Le Mans, but was haunted by his involvement in the disastrous crash that marred the race. Hawthorn died in a road accident three months after retiring; he was allegedly suffering from a terminal illness at the time.

Mike Hawthorn
Mike Hawthorn
BornJohn Michael Hawthorn
10 April 1929
Mexborough, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, UK
Died22 January 1959 (aged 29)
Near Onslow Village, Guildford, Surrey, England, UK
Formula One World Championship career
NationalityUnited Kingdom British
Active years19521958
TeamsFerrari,
Vanwall,
BRM,
non-works Cooper,
non-works Maserati
Entries47 (45 starts)
Championships1 (1958)
Wins3
Podiums18
Career points112 ​914 (127 ​914)[1]
Pole positions4
Fastest laps6
First entry1952 Belgian Grand Prix
First win1953 French Grand Prix
Last win1958 French Grand Prix
Last entry1958 Moroccan Grand Prix
24 Hours of Le Mans career
Years1953, 19551958
TeamsJaguar Cars
Scuderia Ferrari
Best finish1st (1955)
Class wins1 (1955)

Early life

Mike Hawthorn was born in Mexborough, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, to Leslie and Winifred (née Symonds) Hawthorn,[2] and educated at Ardingly College, West Sussex, followed by studies at Chelsea technical college and an apprenticeship with a commercial vehicle manufacturer.[3] His father owned the Tourist Trophy Garage in Farnham, franchised to supply and service several high performance brands including Jaguar and Ferrari.[4] His father raced motorcycles and supported his son's racing career; when he died in a road accident, in 1954, Mike Hawthorn inherited the business.[5]

Racing career

Mike Hawthorn made his competition debut on 2 September 1950 in his 1934 Riley Ulster Imp, KV 9475, winning the 1,100 c.c. sports car class at the Brighton Speed Trials.[6] In 1951, driving a 1½-litre T.T. Riley, he entered the Motor Sport Brooklands Memorial Trophy, a season-long contest run at Goodwood, winning it by one point.[7] He also won the Ulster Trophy Handicap at Dundrod and the Leinster Trophy at Wicklow that year.[8]

1952

By 1952, Hawthorn had switched to single-seaters and during that season won his first race in a Formula Two Cooper-Bristol T20 at Goodwood. Further successes followed which brought him to the attention of Enzo Ferrari who offered him a works drive. He made his Formula One debut at the 1952 Grote Prijs van Belgie on the legendary Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, finishing in fourth place. By the end of the season, he had already secured his first podium, with a third place at the RAC British Grand Prix[9] and a brace of fourths driving a Cooper.[10]

1953

At Scuderia Ferrari for the 1953 season, Hawthorn immediately showed his worth with victory, at his ninth attempt, in the French Grand Prix at Reims, outmanoeuvring Juan Manuel Fangio in what became dubbed 'the race of the century' with the top four drivers finishing within five seconds of each other after 60 laps.[11] This and two other podium finishes helped him end the season fourth overall.[12] He also won the BRDC International Trophy[13] and the Ulster Trophy[14] as well as the 24 Heures de Spa Francorchamps with Ferrari teammate Giuseppe Farina.[15]

1954

Hawthorn was less fortunate in 1954, suffering serious burns in a crash during the Gran Premio di Siracusa,[3] but finished the year with three seconds and then victory in the season finale in Spain, placing him third in the Drivers' Championship.[16] Following the death of his father, Hawthorn left Ferrari to race for Tony Vandervell's Vanwall team, as he needed to spend more time at the family garage he had inherited,[3] but after two races returned to Ferrari.

1955

24 Hours of Le Mans

Le Mans Unfall
The 1955 Le Mans accident

In January 1955, Hawthorn joined the Jaguar racing team, replacing Stirling Moss, who had left for Mercedes.[17] Hawthorn won the 1955 les 24 Heures du Mans following what has been described as an inspired drive in which he set a lap record of 122.388 mph during a three-hour duel with Fangio in the early stages. However, the race was marred by the worst disaster in motor racing history, a crash which killed 84 spectators and Mercedes driver Pierre Levegh. After overtaking Lance Macklin's Healey, Hawthorn suddenly braked in front of him on noticing an order to enter the pits to refuel, causing Macklin to swerve into the path of Levegh's Mercedes. After colliding with the Healey, the Mercedes skipped the earthen embankment separating the spectator area from the track, bounced through spectator enclosures, then hit a concrete stairwell parapet head-on. The impact shattered the front end of the car, which then somersaulted high, pitching debris into the spectator area, before landing atop the earthen embankment. The debris, including bonnet, engine, and front axle, which separated from the frame, flew through the crowd.

Eight hours later, while leading the race 1.5 laps ahead of the Jaguar team, the Mercedes team withdrew from the race, ostensibly as a mark of respect for those who had perished in the accident; the Jaguar team was invited to join them but declined.[18] The French press carried photographs of Hawthorn and Ivor Bueb celebrating their win with the customary champagne but treated them with scorn.[19]

The official inquiry into the accident ruled that Hawthorn was not responsible for the crash, and that it was merely a racing incident. The death of so many spectators was blamed on inadequate safety standards for track design. The track had remained virtually unaltered for 30 years, since the time when the lap record was just 55 m.p.h. The Grandstand and pit areas were demolished and rebuilt soon after.[19] The death toll led to a ban on motorsports in France, Spain, Switzerland, Germany and other nations, until the tracks could be brought to a higher safety standard.

Dundrod

Whilst sharing the Jaguar D-Type with Desmond Titterington during the 1955 RAC Tourist Trophy at Dundrod, Hawthorn passed Fangio twice, and set the lap record for the RAC Tourist Trophy on the Dundrod Circuit, only to lose in the final stages when, running on full tanks, he was passed by Moss when the D Type's engine failed on the last lap.[20][21]

1956-1957

Hawthorn and Collins Ferraris Nurburgring 1957
Hawthorn leads Peter Collins in their Ferrari 801 cars, during the 1957 German Grand Prix

Another change of team for 1956 – this time to BRM - was a failure, and Hawthorn's only podium came in Argentina where the non-appearance of his BRM allowed him to guest drive a Maserati 250F.[22] However, when it appeared, usually only in British races, the new 2.5 BRM was very fast while it lasted, and Hawthorn held off Fangio, leading the first 25 laps at Silverstone in the British GP. He retired the car before half distance owing to deteriorating handling and brakes. Deeply unhappy with the BRM team's management and car preparation, Hawthorn walked out of the team at this point. Hawthorn had left Ferrari because driving for the British Jaguar sports car team was his first priority. He was favoured to win at Le Mans again, but lost ten laps in the pits early in the race, and while the D type repeatedly set fastest laps, the fuel consumption rules meant he could only finish sixth.

Racing the D type in Italy, Hawthorn crashed and suffered very serious burns, his second bad accident of the year, leaving him disillusioned with racing. However, he believed a return to Ferrari could give him the championship in the superior Lancia Ferrari D50. He had put the original Jano version of the car on the front row at its debut in the final F1 race of 1955 at Oulton Park. However, Ferrari's modified version of the design for 1957 was slower than Fangio and Collins's all-conquering 1956 Lancia Ferrari. The 1957 version, with the polar centred pannier tanks removed, still handled well, but was not the masterpiece Jano designed; it lacked straight line speed and was uncompetitive by mid 1957, clearly inferior to the new Vanwalls.

Hawthorn rejoined the Ferrari factory team in 1957, and soon became friends with Peter Collins, a fellow Englishman and Ferrari team driver. During the 1957 and 1958 racing seasons, the two Englishmen became engaged in a fierce rivalry with Luigi Musso, another Ferrari driver, for prize money.[23]

Mike Hawthorn 1958 Argentine GP
Hawthorn driving his Ferrari to third in the Gran Premio de la Republica Argentina

1958 World Champion

Hawthorn won the 1958 Formula One Championship despite achieving only one win, against four by Moss. Hawthorn won the 1958 French Grand Prix at Reims, in which Musso was fatally injured while in second place. Leading easily in the 1958 Monaco Grand Prix at half distance, his 246 engine blew,[24] while at Monza he was a minute ahead of Tony Brooks when his clutch forced him to slow to second place.[25] Hawthorn benefited greatly from the gentlemanliness of Moss, as demonstrated at the 1958 Portuguese Grand Prix at Porto. Hawthorn was disqualified for bump starting his stalled car downhill in the opposite direction, on the way to a second-place finish. Moss interceded on Hawthorn's behalf and the decision was ultimately reversed.[26] After a pit stop midway through that race, Hawthorn accelerated back through the field to gain an extra point for fastest lap. Moss had failed to respond, possibly doubting Hawthorn could lap so fast with damaged drum brakes.[26] This extra world championship point plus the second place points contributed to Hawthorn winning the championship with a season total just one more than that of Moss. In the final race, the 1958 Moroccan Grand Prix, Hawthorn drove a conservative tactical race aiming to stay ahead of Moss's Vanwall teammates. Brooks's car broke while narrowly leading Hawthorn, and Stuart Lewis-Evans in the third Vanwall crashed after a desperate attempt to move through the field and challenge Hawthorn running third; Evans later died of burns. In the last laps, second-placed Phil Hill slowed and waved Hawthorn through to gain enough points to take the Championship; the first ever to be won by an English driver.[3][27]

After winning the title, Hawthorn immediately announced his retirement from Formula One.

Hawthorn was noted for wearing a bow tie when racing,[28][29] to the French, he became known as 'Le Papillon' (The Butterfly).[3]

Rivalry with Luigi Musso

Fiamma Breschi, Luigi Musso's girlfriend at the time of his death, revealed the nature of Musso's rivalry with Hawthorn and Collins in a television documentary, The Secret Life of Enzo Ferrari, many years after the death of Hawthorn. Breschi recalled that the antagonism between Musso and the two English drivers encouraged all three to take more risks: "The Englishmen (Hawthorn and Collins) had an agreement", she says. "Whichever of them won, they would share the winnings equally. It was the two of them against Luigi, who was not part of the agreement. Strength comes in numbers, and they were united against him. This antagonism was actually favourable rather than damaging to Ferrari. The faster the drivers went, the more likely it was that a Ferrari would win." Breschi related that Musso was in debt at the time of his death, and the money for winning the 1958 French Grand Prix (traditionally the largest monetary prize of the season), was all-important to him.[23]

After visiting the mortally-injured Musso in hospital, Breschi returned to her hotel, where she and the rest of the Ferrari team were informed by the team manager that afternoon that Musso had died. Within thirty days Collins too was dead, and the following January, Hawthorn. Breschi could not suppress a feeling of release: "I had hated them both", she said, "first because I was aware of certain facts that were not right, and also because when I came out of the hospital and went back to the hotel, I found them in the square outside the hotel, laughing and playing a game of football with an empty beer can. So when they died, too, it was liberating for me. Otherwise I would have had unpleasant feelings towards them forever. This way I could find a sense of peace."[23][30]

Personal life

Mike Hawthorn never married, but fathered a son, Arnaud Michael Delaunay, by a young girl he met in Reims after winning the French Grand Prix in 1953. He was engaged at the time of his death to the fashion model Jean Howarth, who later married another racing driver, Innes Ireland, in 1992.[31]

Death

1959 Jaguar 3.4 Litre (XLK 495)
A 1959 Jaguar 3.4 Mk.1

On 22 January 1959, only three months into his retirement, Hawthorn died in a car accident on the A3 Guildford bypass while driving his comprehensively-modified 1958 Jaguar 3.4-litre saloon (now known as the 3.4 Mk 1) VDU 881 to London. While the circumstances of the accident are well documented, the precise cause remains unknown.[32]

The accident occurred on a notoriously dangerous section of the road, the scene of 15 serious accidents (two fatal) in the previous two years; the road was also wet at the time. Driving at speed (one witness estimated 80 m.p.h.), Hawthorn overtook a Mercedes-Benz 300SL 'gull-wing' sports car driven by an acquaintance, the motor racing team manager Rob Walker. On entering a right-hand bend shortly after passing the Mercedes, Hawthorn clipped a 'Keep Left' bollard dividing the two carriageways, causing him to lose control. The Jaguar glanced an oncoming Bedford lorry before careering back across the eastbound carriageway sideways into a roadside tree, uprooting it. The impact caused Hawthorn fatal head injuries and propelled him onto the rear seat.

There was inevitable speculation that Hawthorn and Walker had been racing each other, fuelled by Walker's persistent refusal at the coroner's inquest to estimate the speed of his own car at the time.[33] In an interview with motor racing journalist Eoin Young and writer Eric Dymock in 1988, Walker admitted he had indeed been racing Hawthorn, but had been advised by a police officer investigating the accident to make no further mention of it lest he incriminate himself.[34]

Possible causes of the accident include driver error, a blackout, or mechanical failure, although examination of the wreck revealed no obvious fault. There is evidence that Hawthorn had recently suffered blackouts, perhaps because of kidney failure.[35] By 1955, Hawthorn had already lost one kidney to infection, and had begun suffering problems with the other; he was expected at the time to live only three more years.[19]

At the Coroner's Inquest on 26 January the jury returned a verdict of accidental death.[36]

Eponymy

In Farnham, the town where he lived up to the time of his death, there is a street named Mike Hawthorn Drive. It was in this town that Hawthorn ran the Tourist Trophy Garage which sold Jaguars, Rileys, Fiats and Ferraris. There is a hill and corner named after him at Brands Hatch and a corner at the Croft racing circuit at Croft-on-Tees in North Yorkshire, while in Towcester on the Shires estate, three miles from the Silverstone circuit, Hawthorn Drive is named after him. There is a statue at Goodwood Circuit commemorating Hawthorn as the UK's first Formula One World Champion.

Hawthorn Memorial Trophy

The Hawthorn Memorial Trophy has been awarded to the most successful British or Commonwealth Formula 1 driver every year since 1959.[37] Nigel Mansell and Lewis Hamilton have won the award the most times, taking the trophy on seven occasions each. The current holder is Lewis Hamilton, the 2018 World Champion.[38]

Racing record

Career highlights

Season Series Position Team Car
1951 Motor Sport Brooklands Memorial Trophy[3] 1st Riley TT Sprite
Leinster Trophy[39] 1st Riley TT Sprite
1952 Lavant Cup[40] 1st R.J. Chase Cooper-Bristol T20
Chichester Cup[41] 1st Cooper-Bristol T20
Ibsley Grand Prix[42] 1st R.J. Chase Cooper-Bristol T20
Sussex Trophy[41] 1st Cooper-Bristol T20
Scottish National Trophy[43] 1st Leslie D. Hawthorn Connaught-Lea Francis A
Richmond Trophy[44] 2nd Ecurie Richmond Cooper-Bristol T20
Ulster Trophy[45] 2nd Archie Bryde Cooper-Bristol T20
British Empire Trophy[46] 3rd Len Potter Frazer Nash Mille Miglia
RAC British Grand Prix[47] 3rd Leslie D. Hawthorn Cooper-Bristol T20
Daily Mail Trophy[48] 3rd Leslie D. Hawthorn Cooper-Bristol T20
FIA Formula One World Championship[10] 5th Leslie D. Hawthorn
Archie Bryde
Cooper-Bristol T20
1953 Daily Express B.R.D.C. International Trophy[13] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Silverstone International[49] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 340 MM Barchetta Touring
Ulster Trophy[50] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grand Prix de l'A.C.F.[51] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
24 Heures de Spa Francorchamps[52] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 375 MM Pinin Farina Berlinetta
12 Ore di Pescara[53] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 375 MM Coupé
Goodwood Trophy[54] 1st G.A. Vandervell Ferrari Thinwall
Woodcote Cup[54] 1st G.A. Vandervell Ferrari Thinwall
Grand Prix Automobile de Pau[55] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Grand Prix de Rouen-les-Essarts[56] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
Gran Premio Ciudad de Buenos Aires[57] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Großer Preis von Deutschland[58] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
Großer Preis der Schweiz[59] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
FIA Formula One World Championship[12] 4th Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500
1954 Gran Premio Supercortemaggiore[60] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 735 S
RAC Tourist Trophy[61] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 750 Monza
Gran Premio de España[62] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
RAC British Grand Prix[63] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
Circuito de Monsanto[64] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 750 Monza
Großer Preis von Deutschland[65] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
Gran Premio d'Italia[66] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
FIA Formula One World Championship[16] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625
1955 Florida International Twelve Hour Grand Prix of Endurance[67] 1st B.S. Cunningham Jaguar D-Type
Les 24 Heures du Mans[68] 1st Jaguar Cars Ltd. Jaguar D-Type
London Trophy[69] 1st Stirling Moss Ltd. Maserati 250F
Gran Premio Supercortemaggiore[70] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 750 Monza
Daily Herald Trophy[71] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 750 Monza
International Gold Cup[72] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Lancia D50
1956 Daily Express International Trophy[73] 1st Jaguar Cars Ltd. Jaguar Mark VII
Gran Premio Supercortemaggiore[74] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500 TR Touring
Whit Monday Trophy[75] 2nd Lotus-Climax Eleven
12 heures internationales Reims[76] 2nd Jaguar Cars Ltd. Jaguar D-Type
Gran Premio de la Republic Argentina[77] 3rd Owen Racing Organisation Maserati 250F
Sveriges Grand Prix[78] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 860 Monza
FIA Formula One World Championship[79] 11th Owen Racing Organisation
Vandervell Products
Maserati 250F
BRM P25
Vanwall VW2
1957 Daily Express International Trophy[80] 1st Jaguar Cars Jaguar 3.4 Litre
Gran Premio di Napoli[81] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari D50
Großer Preis von Deutschland[82] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 801
Gran Premio de Venezuelav[83] 2nd Equipo Ferrari Ferrari 335 S
12-Hour Florida International Grand Prix of Endurance for The Amoco Trophy[84] 3rd Jaguar Cars North America Jaguar D-Type
Internationales ADAC 1000 Kilometer Rennen auf dem Nürburgring[85] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 315 S
RAC British Grand Prix[86] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 801
FIA Formula One World Championship[87] 4th Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 801
1958 FIA Formula One World Championship[88] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Glover Trophy[89] 1st Ferrari 246
International Daily Express Trophy[90] 1st Jaguar 3.4 Litre
Grand Prix de l'ACF[91] 1st Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Internationales ADAC 1000 Kilometer Rennen Nürburgring[92] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 250 TR 58
Grote Prijs van Belgie[93] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
RAC British Grand Prix[94] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Grande Prémio de Portugal[95] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Gran Premio d'Italia[96] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Grand Prix du Maroc[97] 2nd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Gran Premio de la Republica Argentina[98] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246
Targa Florio[99] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 250 TR 58
500 Millas de Monza[100] 3rd Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 412 MI

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 WDC Pts[1]
1952 Leslie D. Hawthorn Cooper T20 Bristol BS1 2.0 L6 SUI 500 BEL
4
GBR
3
GER NED
4
ITA
NC
5th 10
AHM Bryde FRA
Ret
1953 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari 500 2.0 L4 ARG
4
500 NED
4
BEL
6
FRA
1
GBR
5
GER
3
SUI
3
ITA
4
4th 19 (27)
1954 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625 Ferrari 625 2.5 L4 ARG
DSQ
500 BEL
4*
GBR
2
GER
2*
SUI
Ret
ITA
2
3rd 24 ​914
Ferrari 553 Ferrari 554 2.5 L4 FRA
Ret
ESP
1
1955 Vandervell Products Vanwall VW1 Vanwall 254 2.5 L4 ARG MON
Ret
500 BEL
Ret
NC 0
Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 555 Ferrari 555 2.5 L4 NED
7
ITA
10
Ferrari 625 GBR
6*
1956 Owen Racing Organisation Maserati 250F Maserati 250F1 2.5 L6 ARG
3
BEL
DNS
12th 4
BRM P25 BRM P25 2.5 L4 MON
DNS
500 GBR
Ret
GER ITA
Vandervell Products Vanwall VW2 Vanwall 254 2.5 L4 FRA
10*
1957 Scuderia Ferrari Lancia-Ferrari D50A Ferrari DS50 2.5 V8 ARG
Ret
MON
Ret
500 4th 13
Ferrari 801 FRA
4
GBR
3
GER
2
PES ITA
6
1958 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246 Ferrari 143 2.4 V6 ARG
3
MON
Ret
NED
5
500 BEL
2
FRA
1
GBR
2
GER
Ret
POR
2
ITA
2
MOR
2
1st 42 (49)
Source:[101]

* Indicates Shared Drive

Non-Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39
1952 Ecurie Richmond Cooper T20 Bristol BS1 2.0 L6 RIO SYR VAL RIC
2
LAV
1
PAU IBS
1
MAR AST
Leslie D. Hawthorn INT
Ret
ELÄ NAP EIF PAR ALB FRO ULS
2
MNZ LAC ESS DMT
3
COM NEW
DNS
RIO
AHM Bryde MAR
7
SAB CAE
Leslie D. Hawthorn Connaught A Lea Francis 2.0 L4 NAT
1
BAU MOD CAD SKA MAD AVU JOE
1953 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari 500 2.0 L4 SYR
Ret*
PAU
2
LAV AST BOR INT
1
ELÄ NAP ULS
1
WIN FRO COR EIF ALB PRI GRE ESS MID ROU
2
STR CRY AVU USF LAC DRE BRI CHE SAB NEW CAD SAC RED SKA LON MOD MAD BER JOE CUR
1954 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625 Ferrari 625 2.5 L4 SYR
Ret
PAU LAV BOR INT BAR CUR ROM FRO COR BRC CRY ROU
DSQ
CAE AUG COR OUL RED PES SAC JOE CAD BER GOO
Vandervell Products Vanwall Special Vanwall 254 2.5 L4 DTT
2
1955 Vandervell Products Vanwall VW1 Vanwall 254 2.5 L4 NZL BUE VAL PAU GLO BOR INT
Ret
NAP ALB CUR COR
Stirling Moss Ltd Maserati 250F Maserati 250F1 2.5 L6 LON
1
DRT RED DTT
Scuderia Ferrari Lancia D50 Lancia DS50 2.5 V8 OUL
2
AVO SYR
1956 Owen Racing Organisation Maserati 250F Maserati 250F1 2.5 L6 BUE
9
BRM P25 BRM P25 2.5 L4 GLV
Ret
SYR AIN
Ret
INT
Ret
NAP 100 VNW CAE SUS BRH
1957 Scuderia Ferrari Lancia D50 Lancia DS50 2.5 V8 BUE
4
SYR PAU GLV NAP
2
RMS
Ret
CAE INT MOD
Ferrari 156 Ferrari D156 1.5 V6 MOR
Ret
1958 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 246 Ferrari 143 2.4 V6 BUE GLV
1
SYR AIN INT CAE
Source:[101]
* Indicates shared drive with Alberto Ascari

Complete 24 Hours of Le Mans results

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1953 Italy Scuderia Ferrari Italy Giuseppe Farina Ferrari 340 MM Pinin Farina Berlinetta S5.0 12 DSQ DSQ
1955 United Kingdom Jaguar Cars Ltd. United Kingdom Ivor Bueb Jaguar D-Type S5.0 307 1st 1st
1956 United Kingdom Jaguar Cars Ltd. United Kingdom Ivor Bueb Jaguar D-Type S5.0 280 6th 3rd
1957 Italy Scuderia Ferrari Italy Luigi Musso Ferrari 335 S S5.0 56 DNF DNF
1958 Italy Scuderia Ferrari United Kingdom Peter Collins Ferrari 250 TR 58 S3.0 112 DNF DNF

Complete 12 Hours of Sebring results

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1955 United States B.S. Cunningham United States Phil Walters Jaguar D-Type S5.0 182 1st 1st
1956 United States Jaguar of New York Distributors Inc. United Kingdom Desmond Titterington Jaguar D-Type S5.0 162 DNF DNF
1957 United States Jaguar Cars of North America United Kingdom Ivor Bueb Jaguar D-Type S5.0 193 3rd 2nd
1958 Italy Scuderia Ferrari West Germany Wolfgang von Trips Ferrari 250 TR 58 S3.0 159 DNF DNF

Complete 24 Hours of Spa results

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1953 Italy Scuderia Ferrari Italy Giuseppe Farina Ferrari 375 MM Pinin Farina Berlinetta S 260 1st 1st

Complete Mille Miglia results

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Pos. Class
Pos.
1953 Italy Ferrari Spa Italy Azelio Cappi Ferrari 250 MM Vignale Spyder S+2.0 DNF DNF

Complete 12 Hours of Reims results

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Pos. Class
Pos.
1956 United Kingdom Jaguar Cars Belgium Paul Frère Jaguar D-Type S3.5 2nd 2nd

Complete 12 Hours of Pescara results

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Pos. Class
Pos.
1953 Italy Scuderia Ferrari Italy Umberto Maglioli Ferrari 375 MM Pinin Farina Berlinetta S+2.0 1st 1st

References

  1. ^ a b Up until 1990, not all points scored by a driver contributed to their final World Championship tally (see list of points scoring systems for more information). Numbers without parentheses are Championship points; numbers in parentheses are total points scored.
  2. ^ "Index entry". FreeBMD. ONS. Retrieved 17 October 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Bailey Skilleter, "Mike Hawthorn: Golden Boy" (PJ Publishing Ltd., ISBN 978-1-908658-06-7, 2015)
  4. ^ "Mike Hawthorn - a Tribute ... The Tourist Trophy Garage:Standard Atlas Van Project". Archived from the original on 10 February 2016. Retrieved 17 October 2014.
  5. ^ "Mike Hawthorn - A tribute". Archived from the original on 7 October 2008. Retrieved 20 September 2014.
  6. ^ Motor Sport, October 1950, Page 493; Motor Sport, August 1951, Page 379.
  7. ^ Motor Sport, September 1951, Page 432.
  8. ^ Motor Sport, January 1952, Page 11.
  9. ^ "British GP, 1952 Race Report - GP Encyclopedia - F1 History on Grandprix.com". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  10. ^ a b "Results 1952 Formula 1 Season". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  11. ^ "French GP, 1953 Race Report - GP Encyclopedia - F1 History on Grandprix.com". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  12. ^ a b "Results 1953 Formula 1 Season". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  13. ^ a b "Formula 2 1953 - International Trophy". www.formula2.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  14. ^ "Formula 2 1953 - Ulster Trophy". www.formula2.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  15. ^ "Spa 24 Hours". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  16. ^ a b "Results 1954 Formula 1 Season". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  17. ^ A letter from Mike Hawthorn Archived 27 September 2013 at the Wayback Machine. Mike-hawthorn.org.uk. Retrieved on 2013-08-16.
  18. ^ "Mike Hawthorn & the 1955 24 Hours of Le Mans: The Cause and the Effect". ConceptCarz.com. Retrieved 15 April 2013.
  19. ^ a b c Deadliest Crash:the Le Mans 1955 Disaster BBC Four documentary, broadcast 16 May 2010
  20. ^ Evans, Art (28 February 2012). "History of the Tourist Trophy – Race Profile". Sports Car Digest. Off Camber Group, Inc. Retrieved 5 November 2014.
  21. ^ The Motor. Temple Press Limited. 1959. p. 5.
  22. ^ "Argentine GP, 1956 Race Report - GP Encyclopedia - F1 History on Grandprix.com". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  23. ^ a b c "French GP, 1958 Race Report - GP Encyclopedia - F1 History on Grandprix.com". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  24. ^ "Monaco GP, 1958 Race Report - GP Encyclopedia - F1 History on Grandprix.com". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  25. ^ "Italian GP, 1958 Race Report - GP Encyclopedia - F1 History on Grandprix.com". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  26. ^ a b "Portuguese GP, 1958 Race Report - GP Encyclopedia - F1 History on Grandprix.com". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  27. ^ "Morocco GP, 1958 Race Report - GP Encyclopedia - F1 History on Grandprix.com". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  28. ^ Daley, Robert (15 April 2005). The Cruel Sport: Grand Prix Racing 1959-1967. St. Paul, MN USA: MotorBooks International. p. xv. ISBN 978-0-76032-100-3. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 4 February 2013. The world champion that year was the Ferrari driver Mike Hawthorn, a tall, blond young man who always wore a bow tie when racing. Always. He considered this important. It was his style.
  29. ^ Salmon, Dick (1 May 2007). Brm: A Mechanic's Tale. Dorchester, UK: Veloce Publishing. p. 58. ISBN 978-1-84584-082-2. Retrieved 4 February 2013. Invariably he would greet his friend Peter Collins with the words 'mon ami, mate' and was famous for his bow tie, which earned him the nickname 'Le Pappilon' (sic), meaning the butterfly.
  30. ^ Williams, Richard, Richard Williams Talks to Fiamma Breschi, the Woman Behind Enzo Ferrari, The Guardian, 22 January 2004
  31. ^ Nixon, C. (1991). Mon Ami Mate. Transport Bookman Publications. 400 pages. ISBN 9780851840475
  32. ^ "Mike Hawthorn's fatal accident". Archived from the original on 19 December 2015. Retrieved 30 October 2014.
  33. ^ Farnham Herald, 30 January 1959. How Mike Hawthorn met his death. (Report of coroner's inquest, Guildford Town Hall).[1]
  34. ^ Dymock, E. (2011). Mike Hawthorn & Rob Walker. Books and eBooks on Cars and Motoring, 31 October 2011. Dove Publishing Ltd. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 20 June 2013. Retrieved 19 June 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  35. ^ Mike Hawthorn - 1958 World Champion Tribute. Mike-hawthorn.org.uk. Retrieved on 2013-08-16.
  36. ^ "Open University - Surrey Constabulary Archives". Retrieved 30 October 2014.
  37. ^ "Button receives Hawthorn Trophy". racecar.com. 8 July 2007. Archived from the original on 9 October 2007. Retrieved 16 July 2007.
  38. ^ Gary Chappell (2 July 2015). "Lewis Hamilton takes another swipe at F1 trophies after being named best British driver". Daily Express. Retrieved 6 July 2015.
  39. ^ "Leinster Trophy". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  40. ^ "Formula 2 1952 - Lavant Cup". www.formula2.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  41. ^ a b "1952 Formula Libre Races". www.teamdan.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  42. ^ Allen Brown. "Goodwood, 14 Apr 1952 « International Libre « OldRacingCars.com". www.oldracingcars.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  43. ^ "Formula 2 1952 - National Trophy". www.formula2.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  44. ^ "Formula 2 1952 - Ibsley". www.formula2.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  45. ^ Allen Brown. "Dundrod, 7 Jun 1952 « International Libre « OldRacingCars.com". www.oldracingcars.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  46. ^ "British Empire Trophy". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  47. ^ "Results 1952 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Great Britain". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  48. ^ "Formula 2 1952 - Daily Mail Trophy". www.formula2.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  49. ^ "Silverstone International". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  50. ^ "Formula 2 1952 - Grand Prix of Switzerland". www.formula2.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  51. ^ "Results 1953 Formula 1 Grand Prix of France". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  52. ^ "Spa 24 Hours". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  53. ^ "12 h Pescara". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  54. ^ a b "1953 Formula Libre Races". www.teamdan.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  55. ^ "Formula 2 1953 - Pau GP". www.formula2.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  56. ^ "Formula 2 1953 - Rouen GP". www.formula2.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  57. ^ "Formula 2 1953 - Buenos Aires City GP". www.formula2.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  58. ^ "Results 1953 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Germany". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  59. ^ "Results 1953 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Switzerland". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  60. ^ "Supercortemaggiore". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  61. ^ "Tourist Trophy". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  62. ^ "Results 1954 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Spain". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  63. ^ "Results 1954 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Great Britain". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  64. ^ "Monsanto". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  65. ^ "Results 1954 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Germany". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  66. ^ "Results 1954 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Italy". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  67. ^ "Sebring 12 Hours". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  68. ^ "Le Mans 24 Hours". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  69. ^ "1955 London Trophy". Chicane F1. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  70. ^ "Supercortemaggiore". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  71. ^ "Oulton Park International". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  72. ^ "1955 International Gold Cup". Chicane F1. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  73. ^ "1956 Silverstone International Trophy". touringcarracing.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  74. ^ "Supercortemaggiore". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  75. ^ "1956 Formula Libre Races". www.teamdan.com. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  76. ^ "12 h Reims". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  77. ^ "Results 1956 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Argentina". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  78. ^ "Sveriges Grand Prix". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  79. ^ "Results 1956 Formula 1 Season". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  80. ^ "1957 Silverstone International Trophy". touringcarracing.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  81. ^ "1957 Naples GP". Chicane F1. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  82. ^ "Results 1957 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Germany". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  83. ^ "GP Venezuela". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  84. ^ "Sebring 12 Hours". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  85. ^ "Nürburgring 1000 Kilometres". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  86. ^ "Results 1957 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Great Britain". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  87. ^ "Results 1957 Formula 1 Season". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  88. ^ "Results 1958 Formula 1 Season". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  89. ^ "1958 Glover Trophy". Chicane F1. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  90. ^ "1958 Silverstone International". touringcarracing.net. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  91. ^ http://www.f1-fansite.com/f1-results/results-1958-formula-1-grand-prix -of-france/
  92. ^ "Nürburgring 1000 Kilometres". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  93. ^ "Results 1958 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Belgium". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  94. ^ "Results 1958 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Great Britain". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  95. ^ "Results 1958 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Portugal". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  96. ^ "Results 1958 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Italy". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  97. ^ "Results 1958 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Morocco". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  98. ^ "Results 1958 Formula 1 Grand Prix of Argentina". F1 Fansite. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  99. ^ "Targa Florio". Racing Sports Cars. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  100. ^ "500 Millas de Monza (Monzanapolis) 1958 standings". Driver Database. Retrieved 26 January 2016.
  101. ^ a b "Profile for racing driver Mike Hawthorn". motorsportmagazine.com. Retrieved 1 February 2018.

Further reading

  • Martin Shepherd. Too Fast A Life. Silverwood Books. 2015 ISBN 978-1781323199.
  • Tony Bailey & Paul Skilleter. Mike Hawthorn: Golden Boy. PJ Publishing Ltd. 2014 ISBN 978-1908658067.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Lance Macklin
BRDC International Trophy winner
1953
Succeeded by
José Froilán González
Preceded by
Peter Collins
Pat Griffith
RAC Tourist Trophy
1954 with:
Maurice Trintignant
Succeeded by
Stirling Moss
John Fitch
Preceded by
José Froilán González
Maurice Trintignant
Winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans
1955 with:
Ivor Bueb
Succeeded by
Ron Flockhart
Ninian Sanderson
Preceded by
Juan Manuel Fangio
Formula One World Champion
1958
Succeeded by
Jack Brabham
Records
Preceded by
Alberto Ascari
34 years, 16 days
(1952 season)
Youngest Formula One
World Drivers' Champion

29 years, 192 days
(1958 season)
Succeeded by
Jim Clark
27 years, 188 days
(1963 season)
1952 Formula One season

The 1952 Formula One season was the sixth season of FIA Formula One motor racing. In comparison to previous seasons, the 1952 season consisted of a relatively small number of Formula One races, following the decision to run all the Grand Prix events counting towards the World Championship of Drivers to Formula Two regulations rather than Formula One. The Indianapolis 500 was still run to AAA regulations as in previous seasons.

The 3rd FIA World Championship of Drivers, which began on 18 May and ended on 7 September after eight races, was won by Alberto Ascari, driving for Scuderia Ferrari.

In addition to the Formula One races and the World Championship Formula Two races, numerous other Formula Two races, which did not count towards the Championship, were held during the year.

1953 French Grand Prix

The 1953 French Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 5 July 1953 at Reims. It was race 5 of 9 in the 1953 World Championship of Drivers, which was run to Formula Two rules in 1952 and 1953, rather than the Formula One regulations normally used.

Not only had the Reims circuit's layout changed, the name was different – both in regard to the same thing. The new, faster and slightly longer circuit bypassed the town of Gueux and as a result, the circuit was now called "Reims".

It is popularly known as 'the race of the century' because of the sixty lap battle between Briton Mike Hawthorn and Argentine Juan Manuel Fangio. Hawthorn won the duel after they reportedly swapped the lead at virtually every corner on the Reims circuit. In addition, after 500 km of racing, the four lead cars were less than 5 seconds apart.

1953 Swiss Grand Prix

The 1953 Swiss Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 23 August 1953 at Bremgarten Circuit. It was race 8 of 9 in the 1953 World Championship of Drivers, which was run to Formula Two rules in 1952 and 1953, rather than the Formula One regulations normally used. With his victory at this race, Ferrari driver Alberto Ascari won his second Driver's championship in a row; as teammates Nino Farina and Mike Hawthorn, and Maserati driver Juan Manuel Fangio (who failed to score) now could not beat Ascari's total points score.

The race marked the brief return of Grand Prix-era legend Hermann Lang. He was given a chance to participate in Formula 1 racing driving for Officine Alfieri Maserati after one of their team drivers was injured. He raced in two World Drivers' Championship events overall—one in 1953 and one in 1954—and his result here, a fifth-place finish, was his best result.

1954 British Grand Prix

The 1954 British Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Silverstone on 17 July 1954. It was race 5 of 9 in the 1954 World Championship of Drivers. The 90-lap race was won by Ferrari driver José Froilán González after he started from second position. His teammate Mike Hawthorn finished second and Maserati driver Onofre Marimón came in third.

1954 German Grand Prix

The 1954 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Nürburgring on 1 August 1954. It was race 6 of 9 in the 1954 World Championship of Drivers. It was the 17th German Grand Prix since the race was first held in 1926 and the 16th to be held at the Nürburgring complex of circuits. The race was won by 1951 world champion, Argentine driver Juan Manuel Fangio driving a Mercedes-Benz W196. Ferrari 625 drivers Mike Hawthorn (in a shared drive with José Froilán González) and Maurice Trintignant finished second and third for Scuderia Ferrari.

1954 Italian Grand Prix

The 1954 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 5 September 1954 at Monza. It was race 8 of 9 in the 1954 World Championship of Drivers. The 80-lap race was won by Mercedes driver Juan Manuel Fangio after he started from pole position. Mike Hawthorn finished second for the Ferrari team and his teammates Umberto Maglioli and José Froilán González came in third.

1954 Spanish Grand Prix

The 1954 Spanish Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 24 October 1954 at Pedralbes. It was the ninth and final race in the 1954 World Championship of Drivers. The 80-lap race was won by Ferrari driver Mike Hawthorn after he started from third position. Luigi Musso finished second for the Maserati team and Mercedes driver Juan Manuel Fangio came in third.

1958 Argentine Grand Prix

The 1958 Argentine Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 19 January 1958 at Autodromo Municipal Ciudad de Buenos Aires Circuit. It was race 1 of 11 in the 1958 World Championship of Drivers and race 1 of 10 in the 1958 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The race was the sixth Argentine Grand Prix. It was held on the #2 variation of the circuit. The race was held over 80 laps of the four kilometre circuit for a total race distance of 313 kilometres.

The race was won by British driver Stirling Moss in Rob Walker's privately entered Cooper T43. It was the first World Drivers Championship race win for a rear-engined car and also first win for a privateer team in Formula One and the first by a chassis built by the Cooper Car Company. Moss took his seventh Grand Prix victory by 2.7 seconds over Italian driver Luigi Musso (Ferrari Dino 246). Musso's British teammate Mike Hawthorn (Ferrari Dino 246) was third.

1958 Belgian Grand Prix

The 1958 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 15 June 1958 at Spa-Francorchamps. It was race 5 of 11 in the 1958 World Championship of Drivers and race 4 of 10 in the 1958 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The race was the 19th Belgian Grand Prix and it was held over 24 laps of the 14 kilometre circuit for a race distance of 339 kilometres.

The Belgian Grand Prix returned to the calendar after being off the calendar the year previous, and the 8.7 mile Spa circuit had been slightly modified. The pits had been rebuilt, the pit straight had been widened and straightened and the entire track had been resurfaced. The race distance had been shortened from 36 to 24 laps.

The race was won by British driver Tony Brooks in a Vanwall. It was Brooks first solo Grand Prix victory after his car won the 1957 British Grand Prix in a shared drive with Stirling Moss. Brooks finished 20 seconds ahead of fellow Briton Mike Hawthorn driving a Ferrari 246 F1. Brooks' Vanwall team mate Stuart Lewis-Evans finished third in a career-best finish, the first of just two podium finishes to his short Grand Prix career. The race also marked the first World Championship race start (and finish) by a woman, Maria Teresa de Filippis driving her privately entered Maserati 250F. She finished tenth and last, two laps behind Brooks' Vanwall.

On the last lap, Tony Brooks came out of La Source to end the race, and his gearbox seized as he crossed the line. When Mike Hawthorn was coming out of the same corner to end his race in second, his engine failed as he was coming to the finish line. Stuart Lewis-Evans's suspension collapsed on the way into La Source, and he crawled to the line in third.

Lap leaders: Tony Brooks 21 laps (1, 3, 6–24); Peter Collins 3 laps (2, 4–5).

1958 British Grand Prix

The 1958 British Grand Prix was a Formula One race held on 19 July 1958 at Silverstone. It was race 7 of 11 in the 1958 World Championship of Drivers and race 6 of 10 in the 1958 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers.

1958 Formula One season

The 1958 Formula One season was the 12th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1958 World Championship of Drivers which commenced on 19 January 1958, and ended on 19 October after eleven races. This was the first Formula One season in which a Manufacturers title was awarded, the International Cup for F1 Manufacturers being contested concurrently with the World Championship of Drivers with the exception of the Indianapolis 500 which did not count towards the Cup. Englishman Mike Hawthorn won the Drivers' title after a close battle with compatriot Stirling Moss and Vanwall won the inaugural Manufacturers award from Ferrari. Hawthorn retired from racing at the end of the season, only to die three months later after a road car accident.

The season was one of the most important and tragic seasons in Formula One's history. Four drivers died in four different races during this season. Italian Luigi Musso in his works Ferrari during the French Grand Prix at Reims; Musso's teammate, Englishman Peter Collins during the German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring, Englishman Stuart Lewis-Evans in his Vanwall at the Moroccan Grand Prix in Casablanca, and in a non-Formula One regulated race, American Pat O'Connor at the Indianapolis 500. Hawthorn retired from motor racing after his success, but was killed in a road accident only a few months later. This season was also effectively the last ever year of Grand Prix racing where the field was dominated with front engined-cars; this had been the case since the early 1900s, when car racing was happening in informal events across Europe and the United States. 1959 and 1960 would be transitional years, where grids at Grand Prix events would feature more and more mid-engined cars and fewer front-engined cars. The mid-engined cars, with their better road holding, increased driving comfort, lighter weight and ease on tires and mechanical components (particularly brakes) were clearly the way to go. Even an old-fashioned traditionalist like Enzo Ferrari had to concede that mid-engined cars were what his team needed in order to be competitive- and Ferrari did not have a race-ready mid-engined car until 1961.

1958 French Grand Prix

The 1958 French Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Reims on 6 July 1958. It was race 6 of 11 in the 1958 World Championship of Drivers and race 5 of 10 in the 1958 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers.

The race was won by Mike Hawthorn driving a Ferrari; it was his first Formula One victory since the 1954 Spanish Grand Prix and would prove to be his last. It was also the last Formula One race for five-time World Champion Juan Manuel Fangio. On the final lap, Hawthorn eased up to let Fangio, running fifth at the time, finish on the lead lap of his last race. This turned out to be a blessing, as Peter Collins crashed on the final lap, allowing Fangio to secure fourth.

The race was marred by Ferrari driver Luigi Musso's fatal accident at the Muzione hairpin. His car hurtled off course and crashed into a ditch. Musso was thrown out of the car, was critically injured and died later that day at a hospital near the track.

Of the 21 starters, six died in racing cars within the next three years. Musso died in the race itself, while Peter Collins died in that year's German Grand Prix, Lewis-Evans at the Moroccan Grand Prix, Jean Behra in a support race for the 1959 German Grand Prix, Harry Schell in practice for the 1960 BRDC International Trophy, and Wolfgang von Trips and a dozen spectators died at the 1961 Italian Grand Prix.

1958 Italian Grand Prix

The 1958 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Monza on 7 September 1958. It was race 10 of 11 in the 1958 World Championship of Drivers and race 9 of 10 in the 1958 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers.

1958 Moroccan Grand Prix

The 1958 Moroccan Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Ain-Diab Circuit, Casablanca on 19 October 1958, after a six-week break following the Italian Grand Prix. It was race 11 of 11 in the 1958 World Championship of Drivers and race 10 of 10 in the 1958 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. It is the only time Morocco has hosted a World Championship Grand Prix.

Mike Hawthorn (Ferrari) started from pole position, but Stirling Moss won the race driving for Vanwall. Hawthorn finished second which secured him the World Drivers' Championship. Phil Hill was third, also for Ferrari.

Vanwall made sure of the World Constructors' Championship and both this and Hawthorn's drivers' title were firsts for British teams or drivers.

The race was notable for an accident involving Stuart Lewis-Evans, who died six days later from the burns he sustained.

1958 Portuguese Grand Prix

The 1958 Portuguese Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Circuito da Boavista, Oporto on 24 August 1958. It was race 9 of 11 in the 1958 World Championship of Drivers and race 8 of 10 in the 1958 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers.

Mike Hawthorn was at first disqualified during this race, losing seven points. However, Championship rival Stirling Moss had seen the incident which caused the disqualification and went to the judges to revert the decision since he felt Hawthorn had done nothing wrong. Eventually, Hawthorn was classified and retained his seven points.

Ferrari 246 F1

The Ferrari 246 F1 is a Ferrari racing car built for the Formula One World Championship of 1958. The regulations for 1954–1960 limited naturally aspirated engines to 2500 cc and for the 1958 season there was a change from alcohol fuels to avgas.

The 246 used a 2417 cc Dino V6 engine with a 65° angle between the cylinder banks. This was the first use of a V6 engine in a Formula One car, but otherwise the 246 was a conventional front-engine design. The Ferrari 246 was good enough to win a World Championship for Mike Hawthorn and a second place in the Constructors' Championship for Ferrari.

The Ferrari 246 was not only the first V6-engined car to win a Formula One Grand Prix, the French Grand Prix at Reims in 1958, it was also the last front-engined car to win a Formula One Grand Prix. This occurred at the 1960 Italian Grand Prix at Monza, where the major British teams boycotted the race.In 1960, the Ferrari 246 designation was also used for the first mid-/rear-engined Ferrari, the 246P Formula One car (using same Dino V6 engine of 2417 cc), and then again in 1966 for Ferrari's first three-litre era Formula One car.

Ferrari 553

The Ferrari 553 was a racing car produced by Ferrari which raced in 1953 (when the World Championship was run to F2 regulations) as a Formula Two car and in 1954 as a Formula One car. The 1953 553 F2 car was raced in the 1953 World Drivers' Championship by Umberto Maglioli and Piero Carini. It was first raced at Monza in the 1953 Italian Grand Prix on September 13, 1953. In 1954 the Ferrari 553 F1 car replaced it when the World Championship returned to F1 specifications.

The car competed in six World Championship Grands Prix over the two seasons, making ten individual entries. Its only points finishing position was a win for Mike Hawthorn at the 1954 Spanish Grand Prix.

List of Formula One drivers who set a fastest lap

As of the 2019 British Grand Prix, 132 different drivers have set a fastest lap in a Formula One Grand Prix.

Michael Schumacher holds the record, with 77 fastest laps between the 1992 Belgian Grand Prix and the 2012 German Grand Prix for Benetton, Ferrari, and Mercedes. Gerhard Berger has the most among non-world champions, with 21 between the 1986 German Grand Prix and the 1997 German Grand Prix for Benetton, Ferrari, and McLaren. Sergio Pérez holds the record for the most among non-race winners, with 4. Pérez's came between the 2012 Monaco Grand Prix and the 2017 Monaco Grand Prix for Sauber, McLaren, and Force India.

The first fastest lap, at the 1950 British Grand Prix, went to Giuseppe Farina who was driving for Alfa Romeo. The most recent driver to set their first fastest lap is Pierre Gasly, who achieved this at the 2019 Chinese Grand Prix driving for Red Bull. Alberto Ascari holds the record for the most consecutive fastest laps, with seven from the 1952 Belgian Grand Prix to the 1953 Argentine Grand Prix. Max Verstappen is the youngest driver to set a fastest lap; he was 19 years and 44 days old when he set the fastest lap at the 2016 Brazilian Grand Prix.

The nation which has scored the most fastest laps is the United Kingdom, with 232 fastest laps by 22 drivers. Their first was taken jointly by Stirling Moss, driving a privately entered Maserati, and Mike Hawthorn, driving for Ferrari at the 1954 British Grand Prix. Their most recent was by Lewis Hamilton at the 2019 British Grand Prix, driving for Mercedes. Hamilton also has the most fastest laps among British drivers, with 43 between the 2007 Malaysian Grand Prix and the 2019 British Grand Prix for McLaren and Mercedes.

Luigi Musso

Luigi Musso (28 July 1924 – 6 July 1958) was an Italian racing driver. In 1955 he joined the Ferrari team, entering into a fierce rivalry with Mike Hawthorn and Peter Collins, which boosted the performance of the team, but also encouraged greater risk-taking. According to Musso's fiancée, he was deep in debt by the time of the lucrative 1958 French Grand Prix, where he was fatally injured, somersaulting into a ditch while chasing Hawthorn.

Key personnel
Current drivers
Test drivers
Ferrari Driver Academy
World champions
Drivers' titles
Constructors' titles
Race winners
Former personnel
Formula One cars
IndyCar/CART cars
Sports racing cars
Nine-time
Six-time
Five-time
Four-time
Three-time
Two-time
One-time
Winners of the 12 Hours of Sebring
Six-time
Five-time
Four-time
Three-time
Two-time
One-time

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.