Mike Gazella

Michael Gazella (October 13, 1895 – September 11, 1978) was an American major league baseball player who played for the New York Yankees on several championship teams in the 1920s.[1]

Born in Olyphant, Pennsylvania,[2] Gazella played football as well as baseball at Lafayette College and Mansfield University of Pennsylvania.[3] In 1923, he was signed by New York and played in eight games for the Yankees that season. Consigned to the minor leagues in 1924 and 1925, he played for teams in Minneapolis and Atlanta before rejoining New York in the 1926 season as a utility infielder, usually playing third base.

The Yankees played in the World Series every year Gazella was on the team, winning three. However, Gazella played in only the 1926 Series, in which the Yankees lost to the St. Louis Cardinals.

After retiring, Gazella managed the Ponca City Angels[4] of the Western Association and the Moline Plowboys of the Three-I League, as well as scouted for the Yankees.

Gazella died in an automobile accident in Odessa, Texas on September 11, 1978.

Mike Gazella
Mike Gazella newspaper
1923 newspaper photo of Gazella
Infielder
Born: October 13, 1895
Olyphant, Pennsylvania
Died: September 11, 1978 (aged 82)
Odessa, Texas
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 2, 1923, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1928, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Batting average.241
Hits86
Runs batted in32
Teams
Career highlights and awards

References

  1. ^ Smelser, Marshall (1993). The Life That Ruth Built: A Biography. University of Nebraska Press. p. 328. ISBN 0-8032-9218-X.
  2. ^ Kashatus, William C. (2002). Diamonds in the Coalfields: 21 Remarkable Baseball Players, Managers, and Umpires from Northeast Pennsylvania. McFarland & Company. p. 97. ISBN 0-7864-1176-7.
  3. ^ Beverage, Richard E. (2005). The Hollywood Stars. Arcadia Publishing. p. 30. ISBN 0-7385-3056-5.
  4. ^ Cleve, Craig Allen (2004). Hardball on the Home Front: Major League Replacement Players of World War II. McFarland & Company. p. 39. ISBN 0-7864-1897-4.

External links

1895 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1895 throughout the world.

1923 New York Yankees season

The 1923 New York Yankees season was the 23rd season for this American League franchise and its 21st season in New York. Manager Miller Huggins led the team to their third straight pennant with a 98–54 record, 16 games ahead of the second place Detroit Tigers. The Yankees moved into the now famous Yankee Stadium. In the 1923 World Series, they avenged their 1921 and 1922 losses by defeating the New York Giants in 6 games, 4 games to 2, and won their first World Series title.

1926 New York Yankees season

The 1926 New York Yankees season was the team's 24th season in New York, and its 26th season overall. The team finished with a record of 91–63, winning their fourth pennant, finishing three games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they lost in 7 games to the St. Louis Cardinals, with the series ending with Babe Ruth being caught stealing second in the bottom of the 9th inning in game 7.

1927 New York Yankees season

The 1927 New York Yankees season was their 25th season. The team finished with a record of 110–44, winning their fifth pennant and finishing 19 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics and were tied for first or better for the whole season. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Pittsburgh Pirates. This Yankees team is known for their feared lineup, which was nicknamed "Murderers' Row". This team is widely considered to be the best baseball team in the history of MLB.

1928 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 1928 season was their 26th season. The team finished with a record of 101–53, winning their sixth pennant, finishing 2.5 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the St. Louis Cardinals. Pitcher Urban Shocker died in September due to complications from pneumonia.

1935 Chicago Cubs season

The 1935 Chicago Cubs season was the 64th season for the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 60th in the National League and the 20th at Wrigley Field. The season saw the Cubs finish with 100 wins for the first time in 25 years; they would not win 100 games in another season until 2016. The Cubs won their 14th National League pennant in team history and faced the Detroit Tigers in the World Series, but lost in six games.

The 1935 season is largely remembered for the Cubs' 21-game winning streak. The streak began on September 4 with the Cubs 2.5 games out of first place. They would not lose again until September 28. The streak propelled the Cubs to the National League pennant. The 21-game winning streak tied the franchise and major league record set in 1880 when they were known as the Chicago White Stockings.

1936 Chicago Cubs season

The 1936 Chicago Cubs season was the 65th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 61st in the National League and the 21st at Wrigley Field. The Cubs tied with the St. Louis Cardinals for second in the National League with a record of 87–67.

1937 Chicago Cubs season

The 1937 Chicago Cubs season was the 66th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 62nd in the National League and the 22nd at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished second in the National League with a record of 93–61.

1939 Chicago Cubs season

The 1939 Chicago Cubs season was the 68th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 64th in the National League and the 24th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fourth in the National League with a record of 84–70.

1940 Chicago Cubs season

The 1940 Chicago Cubs season was the 69th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 65th in the National League and the 25th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fifth in the National League with a record of 75–79.

1947 New York Yankees season

The 1947 New York Yankees season was the team's 45th season in New York, and its 47th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 15th pennant, finishing 12 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Bucky Harris. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 7 games. It was the first ever season of the Yankees to be broadcast live on television with WABD providing the television broadcast feed to viewers in the city.

1949 Boston Braves season

The 1949 Boston Braves season was the 79th season of the franchise.

Alibi Ike

Alibi Ike is a 1935 American romantic comedy film directed by Ray Enright and starring Joe E. Brown and Olivia de Havilland. Based on the short story "Alibi Ike" by Ring Lardner, the film is about an ace baseball player nicknamed "Alibi Ike" due to his penchant for making up excuses. After falling in love with the beautiful sister-in-law of the team manager, he is kidnapped by gangsters who want him to throw the last game of the season and the pennant.

Alibi Ike was the most successful of Joe E. Brown's "baseball trilogy" of films, which also included Elmer the Great and Fireman Save My Child. It is considered one of the best baseball comedies of all time. Alibi Ike was the first feature film released starring Olivia de Havilland, although she made two previous films that were released later that year—The Irish in Us and A Midsummer Night's Dream.

A print of this film is held by the Library of Congress.

Joe Dugan

Joseph Anthony (Joe) Dugan (May 12, 1897 – July 7, 1982), was an American professional baseball player. Nicknamed "Jumping Joe", he was considered one of the best defensive third basemen of his era. He played in Major League Baseball as a shortstop and third baseman from 1917 through 1931, most notably for the Philadelphia Athletics and the New York Yankees, with whom he played in five World Series.

Lafayette Leopards baseball

The Lafayette Leopards baseball team represents Lafayette College in NCAA Division I college baseball. The team participates in the Patriot League. They are currently coached by Joe Kinney and assistant coaches Tim Reilly, Andrew Dickson, Ben Flanary and Gregg Durrah. They play home games in Hilton Rahn '51 Field at Kamine Stadium. The Leopards have advanced to the College World Series four times. Lafayette has also qualified for the NCAA tournament ten times, but only twice since 1966.

Mansfield University of Pennsylvania

Mansfield University of Pennsylvania is a small public university in Mansfield, Pennsylvania. It is one of the fourteen state universities that are part of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). The university is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and numerous national professional organizations. Mansfield University's total enrollment is 1,637 students.

Moline Plowboys

The Moline Plowboys were a minor league baseball team in Moline, Illinois that existed for 27 seasons between 1914 and 1948. From 1914 to 1923, they played in the Class B Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League (Three-I League); from 1924 to 1932, they played in the Class D Mississippi Valley League; and from 1937 to 1941, they again played in the Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League, before joining the Central Association in 1947-48. The Plowboys' ballpark from 1920 to 1948 was Browning Field. Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Warren Giles, future President of the National League was President of the Plowboys Franchise from 1919–1922.

Murderers' Row

Murderers' Row were the baseball teams of the New York Yankees in the late 1920s, widely considered one of the best teams in history. The nickname is in particular describing the first six hitters in the 1927 team lineup: Earle Combs, Mark Koenig, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Bob Meusel, and Tony Lazzeri.

October 13

October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 79 days remain until the end of the year.

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