Micropolitan statistical area

United States micropolitan statistical areas (µSA, where the initial Greek letter mu represents "micro-"), as defined by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), are labor market areas in the United States centered on an urban cluster (urban area) with a population of at least 10,000 but fewer than 50,000 people.[1] The micropolitan area designation was created in 2003. Like the better-known Metropolitan Statistical Areas, a micropolitan area is a geographic entity used for statistical purposes based on counties and county equivalents.[1] The OMB has identified 536 micropolitan areas in the United States.

The term "micropolitan" gained currency in the 1990s to describe growing population centers in the United States that are removed from larger cities, in some cases by 100 miles (160 km) or more.

Micropolitan cities do not have the economic or political importance of large cities, but are nevertheless significant centers of population and production, drawing workers and shoppers from a wide local area. Because the designation is based on the core urban cluster's population and not on that of the whole area, some micropolitan areas are actually larger than some metropolitan areas. For example, the Ottawa–Peru, IL Micropolitan Statistical Area had a 2010 census population of 154,908. That would put its total population ahead of roughly 100 individual locations classified as a Metropolitan Statistical Area in 2010. The largest of the areas, around Claremont and Lebanon, New Hampshire, had a population in excess of 218,000 in 2010; Claremont's population was only 13,355 in that year's census,[2] and Lebanon's population was only 13,151.[3]

Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas (CBSAs) of the United States and Puerto Rico, Feb 2013
An enlargeable map of the 955 Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs) of the United States and Puerto Rico. The 374 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) are shown in medium green. The 581 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs) are shown in light green.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b OMB BULLETIN NO. 10-02[1]
  2. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): Claremont city, New Hampshire". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved August 30, 2017.
  3. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Lebanon city, New Hampshire". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved August 30, 2017.

External links

Bluefield micropolitan area

The Bluefield Micropolitan Statistical Area, as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is an area consisting of two counties – one in West Virginia and one in Virginia – anchored by the city of Bluefield, West Virginia.

As of the 2010 census, the μSA had a population of 107,342.

Combined statistical area

Combined statistical area (CSA) is a United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) term for a combination of adjacent metropolitan (MSA) and micropolitan statistical areas (µSA) in the United States and Puerto Rico that can demonstrate economic or social linkage. The OMB defines a CSA as consisting of various combinations of adjacent metropolitan and micropolitan areas with economic ties measured by commuting patterns. These areas that combine retain their own designations as metropolitan or micropolitan statistical areas within the larger combined statistical area.

The primary distinguishing factor between a CSA and an MSA/µSA is that the social and economic ties between the individual MSAs/µSAs within a CSA are at lower levels than between the counties within an MSA. CSAs represent multiple metropolitan or micropolitan areas that have an employment interchange of at least 15%. CSAs often represent regions with overlapping labor and media markets.

As of September 2018, there are 172 combined statistical areas in the United States, plus another three in Puerto Rico.

Danville, Virginia micropolitan area

The Danville Micropolitan Statistical Area is a Micropolitan Statistical Area (μSA) in Virginia as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB). As of the 2010 census, the μSA had a population of 106,561The Danville μSA was previously classified as a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) until 2013, when it was demoted to a Micropolitan Statistical Area due to core city's population falling below 50,000.

Grand Island metropolitan area

The Grand Island metropolitan area, as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is an area consisting of four counties in Nebraska, anchored by the city of Grand Island. It was upgraded from a micropolitan area and Hamilton County was added in 2012 when Grand Island's population surpassed 50,000.

As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 68,305 (a July 1, 2009 estimate placed the population at 71,596).

Kearney Micropolitan Statistical Area

The Kearney Micropolitan Statistical Area, as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is an area consisting of two counties in Nebraska, anchored by the city of Kearney.

As of the 2010 census, the area had a population of 52,591 (though a July 1, 2011 estimate placed the population at 53,278).

Lincoln Parish, Louisiana

Lincoln Parish (French: Paroisse de Lincoln) is a parish located in the U.S. state of Louisiana. As of the 2010 census, the population was 46,735. The parish seat is Ruston. The parish was created on February 24, 1873 from parts of Bienville, Claiborne, Union, and Jackson parishes, and its boundaries have changed only once (in 1877). This makes Lincoln parish one of the Reconstruction parishes.Lincoln Parish comprises the Ruston, LA Micropolitan Statistical Area.

List of United States counties and county equivalents

This article lists the 3,242 counties and county equivalents of the United States. The United States are divided into 3,007 counties, political and geographic subdivisions of a state. 235 other local governments and geographic places are also first-order administrative divisions of their respective state/district/territory, but are called by different names. These are referred to collectively as county equivalents by the United States Census Bureau. The 235 county equivalents include 100 equivalents in the territories (such as those in Puerto Rico), outside the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The large majority of counties and equivalents were organized by 1970. Since that time, most creations, boundary changes and dissolutions have occurred in Alaska and Virginia.Among the 50 states, 44 are partitioned entirely into counties, with no county equivalents. Louisiana is instead divided into 64 equivalent parishes, while Alaska is divided into 19 equivalent boroughs and 10 sparsely populated census areas, the latter also known collectively as the unorganized borough. Virginia is composed of a mixture of 95 counties and 38 independent cities. Maryland, Missouri and Nevada are each composed entirely of counties, except that each also has exactly one independent city: Baltimore, St. Louis, and Carson City, respectively. The District of Columbia is a single federal district. All of the above 135 exceptional cases are reckoned as county equivalents. The number of counties (or equivalents) per state ranges from the three counties of Delaware, to the 254 counties of Texas. In New England, where the town model predominates, several counties have no corresponding local governments, existing only as historical legal and census boundaries. These are the counties of Connecticut and Rhode Island, as well as 8 of Massachusetts' 14 counties. In all, the 50 states consist of 3,141 counties and equivalents. Adding the District of Columbia gives 3,142.

Similarly, the Census Bureau treats 100 subdivisions of the territories of the United States as county equivalents. These are the 78 municipalities of Puerto Rico, the three major islands of the U.S. Virgin Islands, the three districts and two atolls of American Samoa, Guam as a single island and county equivalent, the four municipalities of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the nine island territories of the U.S. Minor Outlying Islands. As in the states, each territorial county equivalent has its own INCITS/FIPS codes.

List of core-based statistical areas

The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has defined 917 core-based statistical areas (CBSAs) for the United States and 12 for Puerto Rico. The OMB defines a core-based statistical area as one or more adjacent counties or county equivalents that have at least one urban core area of at least 10,000 population, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties. The 929 Core Based Statistical Areas currently defined by the OMB include the 388 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), which have an urban core population of at least 50,000, and the 541 Micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), which have an urban core population of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000.

List of micropolitan statistical areas

The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has defined 536 micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs) for the United States and five for Puerto Rico. The OMB defines a Micropolitan Statistical Area as one or more adjacent counties or county equivalents that have at least one urban core area of at least 10,000 population but less than 50,000, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties.

Martinsville, Virginia micropolitan area

The Martinsville Micropolitan Statistical Area is a United States Micropolitan Statistical Area (μSA) in Virginia, as defined by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) as of June, 2003. As of the 2000 census, the μSA had a population of 73,346 (though a July 1, 2009 estimate placed the population at 69,523).

Putnam County, Florida

Putnam County is a county located in the state of Florida. As of the 2010 census, the population was 74,364. Its county seat is Palatka.Putnam County comprises the Palatka, FL Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Jacksonville-St. Marys-Palatka, FL-GA Combined Statistical Area. The county is centrally located between Jacksonville, Gainesville, St. Augustine, and Daytona Beach.

Rio Arriba County, New Mexico

Rio Arriba County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 40,246. Its county seat is Tierra Amarilla. Its northern border is the Colorado state line.

Rio Arriba County comprises the Española, NM Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Albuquerque-Santa Fe-Las Vegas, NM Combined Statistical Area.

Safford, Arizona micropolitan area

The Safford Micropolitan Statistical Area, as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is an area consisting of one county in eastern Arizona, anchored by the city of Safford.

As of 2010, the United States Census Bureau estimates that the μSA had a population of 37,220.Before 2013, Safford micropolitan statistical area also contained Greenlee County, Arizona. In 2013, the United States Office of Management and Budget removed Greenlee county from the micropolitan area's definition.

Saline County, Illinois

Saline County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois. According to the 2010 census, it had a population of 24,913. Its county seat is Harrisburg. It is located in the southern portion of Illinois known locally as "Little Egypt".

There are three major towns in Saline County connected by U.S. Route 45, and formerly by the now abandoned Cairo and Vincennes/Big Four/New York Central Line, from north to south, Eldorado, Harrisburg, and Carrier Mills.

Saline County is currently the 79th wealthiest county in the state, out of 102.

Southeastern United States

The Southeastern United States is broadly, the eastern portion of the Southern United States, and the southern portion of the Eastern United States. It comprises at least a core of states on the lower Atlantic seaboard and eastern Gulf Coast. Expansively, it includes everything south of the Mason-Dixon line, the Ohio River and the 36°30' parallel, and as far west as Arkansas and Louisiana. There is no official U.S. government definition of the region, though various agencies and departments use different definitions.

Statistical area (United States)

The United States federal government defines and delineates the nation's metropolitan areas for statistical purposes, using a set of standard statistical area definitions. As of 2013, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defined and delineated 388 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 541 micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs) in the United States and Puerto Rico. Many of these 929 MSAs and μSAs are, in turn, components of larger combined statistical areas (CSAs) consisting of adjacent MSAs and μSAs that are linked by commuting ties; as of 2013, 524 metropolitan and micropolitan areas are components of the 169 defined CSAs.

Metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas are defined as consisting of one or more adjacent counties or county equivalents with at least one urban core area meeting relevant population thresholds, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core, as measured by commuting ties. A metropolitan statistical area has at least one urban core with a population of at least 50,000. In a micropolitan statistical area, the largest urban core has a population of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000.

Staunton–Waynesboro metropolitan area

The Staunton–Waynesboro Metropolitan Statistical Area is a United States Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in Virginia, as defined by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). As of the 2010 census, the MSA had a population of 118,502.

Summit County, Colorado

Summit County is one of the 64 counties in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,994. The county seat is Breckenridge.Summit County comprises the Breckenridge, CO Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Warren County, Mississippi

Warren County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 48,773. Its county seat is Vicksburg. Created by legislative act of 22 December 1809, Warren County is named for American Revolutionary War officer Joseph Warren.

Part of the Mississippi Delta and the historic cotton culture, Warren County is included in the Vicksburg, MS Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Jackson-Vicksburg-Brookhaven, MS Combined Statistical Area.

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The 100 most populous metropolitan statistical areas of the United States of America

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