Mick Tingelhoff

Henry Michael "Mick" Tingelhoff (born May 22, 1940) is a former American football center who played for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL) from 1962 to 1978. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2015, his 32nd year of eligibility.

Mick Tingelhoff
No. 53
Position:Center
Personal information
Born:May 22, 1940 (age 78)
Lexington, Nebraska
Career information
High school:Lexington (NE)
College:Nebraska
Undrafted:1962
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:240
Games started:240
Fumbles recovered:13
Player stats at NFL.com

College career

Tingelhoff attended the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He earned three letters during his football career there, but did not become a starter until his senior season in 1961. Mick was a co-captain of that 1961 team, which had its biggest offensive output in over five seasons.[1] Tingelhoff participated in the Senior Bowl in Mobile, Alabama and in the All-American Bowl after the regular season was over.

Professional career

After graduating from Nebraska, Tingelhoff entered the 1962 NFL Draft but was not drafted and instead signed with the Minnesota Vikings as a free agent in 1962. He became their starting center during his rookie season and held that spot until he retired in 1978. He was an AP First Team All-Pro selection for the first of five times in 1964 and also began a streak of six straight Pro Bowl appearances (1964–1969) that season. In 1967, he was named First Team All-Pro by Newspaper Enterprise Association and UPI and Second Team All-Pro by the AP. In 1969, he was named the NFL's Top Offensive Lineman of the Year by the 1,000-Yard Club in Columbus, Ohio.[1] In 1970, he was named First Team All-Pro by both the PFWA and Pro Football Weekly. He was also named Second Team All-Pro by Newspaper Enterprise Association. He was named First Team All-NFC for that season by the AP.

Tingelhoff was one of 11 players to have played in all four Vikings Super Bowl appearances in the 1970s, and is generally considered the best center of his era. At the time of his retirement he had started in the 2nd most consecutive games (240 games) in NFL history behind teammate Jim Marshall (270). He was inducted into the Vikings Ring of Honor in 2001 and has had his #53 retired by the franchise.

He is also a member of the Nebraska Football Hall of Fame and was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2015.[2]

In 2011, Tinglehoff was named as that year's recipient of the Gerald R. Ford Legends Award. The award was presented to him during the 12th Annual Rimington Trophy Presentation banquet on Saturday, January 14, 2012 at the Rococo Theatre in Lincoln, Nebraska.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b Crazy Canton Cuts
  2. ^ Craig, M. (January 31, 2015). "Long wait is over: Tingelhoff elected to Pro Football Hall of Fame". StarTribune. Retrieved January 31, 2015.
  3. ^ huskers.com
1962 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1962 season was the Minnesota Vikings' second in the National Football League. Under head coach Norm Van Brocklin, the team finished with a 2–11–1 record that still stands as the franchise's worst season record in terms of winning percentage, both by today's standards (.179) and at the time (.154), when ties weren't counted as games played. The Vikings have won at least three games in every season since.

1963 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1963 season was the Minnesota Vikings' third in the National Football League. Under head coach Norm Van Brocklin, the team finished with a 5–8–1 record. Five wins in a season represented the most in the franchise's three-year history. 22-year-old Paul Flatley of Northwestern University was named the NFL's Rookie of the Year, a first for the fledgling franchise.

1964 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in the NFL in 1964. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1964 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1964 season was the Minnesota Vikings' fourth in the National Football League. Under head coach Norm Van Brocklin, the team finished with an 8–5–1 record, the most wins they had accrued in a season since joining the league. To date, this is the only season the Vikings wore white jerseys for their home games.

1965 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of National Football League (American football) players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1965. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1965 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1965 season was the Minnesota Vikings' fifth in the National Football League. Under head coach Norm van Brocklin, the team finished with a 7–7 record.

1966 All-Pro Team

The Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and New York Daily News selected All-Pro players following the 1966 NFL season.

1966 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1966 season was the Minnesota Vikings' sixth in the National Football League. Sixth-year head coach Norm Van Brocklin resigned at the end of the season, after the team finished with a 4–9–1 record.

1967 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1967. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1969 All-Pro Team

This is a list of players named as All-Pros based on their performance in the 1969 AFL and NFL season. These lists provide a perspective into how players were judged against their peers by critics of their time. Players representing both the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL) are included.

1969 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1969 season was the Minnesota Vikings' ninth season in the National Football League. With a 12–2 record, the Vikings won the NFL Central division title, before beating the Los Angeles Rams in the Western Conference Championship Game, and the Cleveland Browns in the last NFL Championship Game ever played in the pre-merger era. With these wins, the Vikings became the last team to possess the Ed Thorp Memorial Trophy, introduced 35 years earlier in 1934.

However, Minnesota lost Super Bowl IV in New Orleans to the AFL champion Kansas City Chiefs in the final professional football game between the two leagues. It was the second consecutive Super Bowl win for the younger league.

The Vikings won the last NFL Championship prior to the league's merger with the American Football League. The season was chronicled for America's Game: The Missing Rings, as one of the five greatest NFL teams to never win the Super Bowl.

1970 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1970. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the consensus All-Pro team for 1970.

Buck Buchanan

Junious "Buck" Buchanan (September 10, 1940 – July 16, 1992) was a professional American football defensive tackle with the Kansas City Chiefs in the American Football League (AFL) and in the National Football League (NFL). Buchanan was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1996 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1990.

Curley Culp

Curley Culp (born March 10, 1946) is a former professional American football player. An offensive and defensive lineman, he played college football at Arizona State University, was the NCAA heavyweight wrestling champion while at ASU, and played professionally in the American Football League for the Kansas City Chiefs in 1968 and 1969, and for the National Football League Chiefs, Houston Oilers, and the Detroit Lions. He was an AFL All-Star in 1969 and a six-time AFC–NFC Pro Bowler.

On Saturday, August 3, 2013, Culp was enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Doug Davis (American football)

Douglas Sherone Davis (July 2, 1944 – February 10, 2011) was a professional American football tackle for seven seasons for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League. He was born July 2, 1944 in Elkton, Md. and was the son of Newton and Grace Reynolds Davis. He married to Roberta () and had a son Brian Davis. His siblings include (sisters) Christine Thomas, Bertha (Lowell) Kennedy,Nancy (James) Griffith, Brothers Larry (Phyllis) Davis, Kenneth Davis, Earnst (Brenda) Davis. Doug graduated from Centerburg High School in Central Ohio in 1962 and continued his education at the University of Kentucky. He was a member of the Wildcat football team from 1962 to 1966. He was chosen by the Wigman of America to be a National High School All American All Star player which earned him the right to play in the All-Star game in Dallas, Texas. Drafted in the 5th round, first pick by the Minnesota Vikings, he appeared in 148 career regular season games. Along with Grady Alderman, Mick Tingelhoff, Jim Vellone and Milt Sunde, he formed a highly-effective offensive line which played a significant role in the Vikings reaching Super Bowl IV in 1970. Following his football career, Davis worked as a highly respected national sales director for a water technology company for 25 years in Sarasota FL.

He died on 10 February 2011 in Brandon, Florida where he lived. He was 66.

Lexington, Nebraska

Lexington is a city in Dawson County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 10,230 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Dawson County. Lexington is located in southern Nebraska, on the Platte River, southeast of North Platte. It sits along the route of U.S. Route 30 and the Union Pacific Railroad. In the 1860s it was the location of a stop along the Pony Express.

List of most consecutive starts and games played by National Football League players

This is a list of the most consecutive starts and games played by a player by position in the NFL.Brett Favre's starts streak of 297 games is the longest all-time. Among defensive players, Jim Marshall's starts streak of 270 is the longest all-time. Of special note is punter Jeff Feagles, who played in 352 consecutive games which is the longest of all-time for a special teams player. Special teams players are not credited with starts in the NFL. In 2018, Ryan Kerrigan became the most recent player to surpass someone at his position for consecutive starts, having broken the previous mark for left outside linebackers previously held by Jason Gildon.Updated through 2018 season

Bold denotes an active streak

Minnesota Vikings

The Minnesota Vikings are a professional American football team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Vikings joined the National Football League (NFL) as an expansion team in 1960, and first took the field for the 1961 season. The team competes in the National Football Conference (NFC) North division.During the 1960s, the Vikings' record was typical for an expansion franchise, but improved over the course of the decade, resulting in a Central Division title in 1968. In 1969, their dominant defense led to the Vikings' league championship, the last NFL championship prior to the merger of the NFL with the AFL.

The team plays its home games at U.S. Bank Stadium in the Downtown East section of Minneapolis.

Super Bowl IV

Super Bowl IV, the fourth and final AFL-NFL World Championship Game in professional American football, was played on January 11, 1970, at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana. The American Football League (AFL) champion Kansas City Chiefs defeated the National Football League (NFL) champion Minnesota Vikings by the score of 23–7. This victory by the AFL squared the Super Bowl series with the NFL at two games apiece. The two leagues merged into one after the game.

Despite the AFL's New York Jets winning the previous season's Super Bowl, many sports writers and fans thought it was a fluke and continued to believe that the NFL was still superior to the AFL, and thus fully expected the Vikings to defeat the Chiefs; the Vikings entered the Super Bowl as 12.5 to 13-point favorites. Minnesota posted a 12–2 record during the 1969 NFL season before defeating the Cleveland Browns, 27–7, in the 1969 NFL Championship Game. The Chiefs, who previously appeared in the first Super Bowl, finished the 1969 AFL season at 11–3, and defeated the Oakland Raiders, 17–7, in the 1969 AFL Championship Game.

Under wet conditions, the Chiefs defense dominated Super Bowl IV by limiting the Minnesota offense to only 67 rushing yards, forcing three interceptions, and recovering two fumbles. Kansas City's Len Dawson became the fourth consecutive winning quarterback to be named Super Bowl MVP. He completed 12 of 17 passes for 142 yards and one touchdown, with one interception. Dawson also recorded three rushing attempts for 11 yards.

Super Bowl IV is also notable for NFL Films miking up the Chiefs' Hank Stram during the game, the first time that a head coach had worn a microphone during a Super Bowl.

Franchise
Stadiums
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Division championships (20)
Conference championships (4)
League championships (1)
Retired numbers
Current league affiliations
Seasons (57)
Minnesota Vikings Ring of Honor
Quarterbacks
Running backs
Wide receivers /
ends
Tight ends
Offensive
linemen
Pre-modern era
two-way players
Defensive
linemen
Linebackers
Defensive backs
Placekickers
and punters
Coaches
Contributors

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.