Michael of Synnada

Michael of Synnada (Michael the Confessor) (died 818) was a bishop of Synnada from 784.[1] He represented Byzantium in diplomatic missions to Harun al-Rashid and Charlemagne. He was exiled by Emperor Leo V the Armenian because of his opposition to iconoclasm. Honored by the Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches, his feast day is May 23.

Life

Michael was much influenced by Patriarch Tarasios of Constantinople, who sent him to a monastery on the coast of the Black Sea. An associate of Saint Theophylact of Nicomedia, once during a harvest in a time of drought, they caused rainfall through their prayers.[2]

Patriarch Tarasius consecrated Michael Bishop of the city of Synnada. He was present at the Seventh Ecumenical Council at Nicea in 787.[2] At the request of the Emperor, he visited Caliph Harun al-Rashid to conduct peace negotiations.[3] He also carried out diplomatic missions for Byzantium at the court of Charlemagne.

He clashed with the Emperor Leo the Armenian over Leo's policy of iconoclasm, and was exiled,[2] where he died on 23 May, 826,[4] in want and poverty, faithful to Orthodoxy to the end.[3]

He died in 818.[3]

Veneration

He is an Orthodox and Roman Catholic[5] saint. His feast day is celebrated on May 23.[2] He is invoked for protection of crops from pests.[6]

St. Michael is depicted with St. Athanasius in the Icon of the Mother of God “Economissa”.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ Steven Bigham (editor),Heroes of the Icon: People, Places, Events (2000), p. 111.
  2. ^ a b c d "St Michael the Confessor the Bishop of Synnada", Orthodox Church in America
  3. ^ a b c "St Michael, Bishop of Synnada", Serbian Orthodox Church
  4. ^ Pétridès, Sophrone. "Synnada." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 14. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. 25 Jan. 2014
  5. ^ Saint of the Day, May 23
  6. ^ "List of Saints Called Upon for Special Purposes", Orthodox Prayer
  7. ^ Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America
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Athleta Christi

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The Cappadocians advanced the development of early Christian theology, for example the doctrine of the Trinity, and are highly respected as saints in both Western and Eastern churches.

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Confessor of the Faith

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In Christian tradition, the Four Evangelists are Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, the authors attributed with the creation of the four Gospel accounts in the New Testament that bear the following titles: Gospel according to Matthew; Gospel according to Mark; Gospel according to Luke and Gospel according to John.

Great martyr

Great Martyr or Great-Martyr (Greek: μεγαλομάρτυς or μεγαλομάρτυρ, megalomartys or megalomartyr, from megas, "great" + "martyr") is a classification of saints who are venerated in the Eastern Orthodox Church and those Eastern Catholic Churches which follow the Rite of Constantinople.

Generally speaking, a Great Martyr is a martyr who has undergone excruciating tortures—often performing miracles and converting unbelievers to Christianity in the process—and who has attained widespread veneration throughout the Church. These saints are often from the first centuries of the Church, before the Edict of Milan. This term is normally not applied to saints who could be better described as hieromartyrs (martyred clergy) or protomartyrs (the first martyr in a given region).

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List of Confessors

The Confessor (short for Confessor of the Faith) is a title bestowed by the Christian Church. Those so honored include:

Basil the Confessor (died 750), Eastern Orthodox saint and monk

Saint Chariton, 3rd-4th-century saint

Edward the Confessor (1003/1005–1066), one of the last Anglo-Saxon kings of England, Roman Catholic saint

Ernest I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1497–1546), early champion of the Protestant Reformation

George the Confessor (died 814), Bishop of Antioch in Pisidia

George the Standard-Bearer (died 821), Archbishop of Mytilene

Isaac of Dalmatia (died 383 or 396), Orthodox saint, monk and founder of a monastery

Jacob of Nisibis (died 4th century), Bishop of Nisibis

Luka (Voyno-Yasenetsky) (died 1961), Eastern Orthodox saint and bishop

Maximus the Confessor (c. 580–662), Byzantine civil servant, Christian monk, theologian and scholar

Michael of Synnada (died 826), Catholic and Orthodox saint, bishop of Synnada

Nicetas of Medikion, (died 824), iconophile monk and Orthodox saint

Saint Nicetas the Patrician (761/62–836), iconophile monk and Orthodox saint

Paphnutius of Thebes (died 4th century), bishop and saint

Paul I of Constantinople (died c. 350), bishop of Constantinople, Roman Catholic and Orthodox saint

Samuel the Confessor (597–693), Coptic Orthodox saint, founder of a monastery

Theophanes the Confessor (c. 758/760–817/818), Byzantine aristocrat, monk and chronicler, Roman Catholic and Orthodox saint

Malachi

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In the Septuagent or Greek Old Testament, the Prophetic Books are placed last, making Book of Malachi the last protocanonical book before the Deuterocanonical books or The New Testament. According to the 1897 Easton's Bible Dictionary, it is possible that Malachi is not a proper name, but simply means "messenger of YHWH". The Greek Old Testament superscription is ἐν χειρὶ ἀγγέλου αὐτοῦ, (by the hand of his messenger).

Melchior (magus)

Saint Melchior, or Melichior, was purportedly one of the Biblical Magi along with Caspar and Balthazar who visited the infant Jesus after he was born. Melchior was often referred to as the oldest member of the Magi. He was traditionally called the King of Persia and brought the gift of gold to Jesus. In the Western Christian church, he is regarded as a saint (as are the other two Magi).

Military saint

The military saints or warrior saints (also called soldier saints) of the Early Christian Church are

Christian saints who were soldiers in the Roman Army during the persecution of Christians, especially the Diocletian persecution of AD 303–313.

Most were soldiers of the Empire who had become Christian and, after refusing to participate in rituals of loyalty to the Emperor (see Imperial cult), were subjected to corporal punishment including torture and martyrdom.

Veneration of these saints, most notably of Saint George, was reinforced in Western tradition during the time of the Crusades.

The title of "champion of Christ" (athleta Christi) was originally used for these saints, but in the late medieval period also conferred on contemporary rulers by the Pope.

Our Lady of Laus

Our Lady of Laus (French: Notre-Dame du Laus) or Refuge of Sinners denotes Marian apparitions that took place between 1664 and 1718 in Saint-Étienne-le-Laus, France, to Benoite Rencurel, a young shepherdess. They were approved by the Holy See on May 5, 2008.

Saint Timothy

Timothy (Greek: Τιμόθεος; Timótheos, meaning "honouring God" or "honoured by God") was an early Christian evangelist and the first Christian bishop of Ephesus, who tradition relates died around the year AD 97.

Timothy was from the Lycaonian city of Lystra in Asia Minor, born of a Jewish mother who had become a Christian believer, and a Greek father. The Apostle Paul met him during his second missionary journey and he became Paul’s companion and co-worker along with Silas. The New Testament indicates that Timothy traveled with Paul the Apostle, who was also his mentor. Paul entrusted him with important assignments. He is addressed as the recipient of the First and Second Epistles to Timothy.

Silas

Silas or Silvanus (; Greek: Σίλας/Σιλουανός; fl. 1st century AD) was a leading member of the Early Christian community, who accompanied Paul the Apostle on parts of his first and second missionary journeys.

Theophylact (son of Michael I)

Theophylact or Theophylaktos (Greek: Θεοφύλακτος; c. 793 – 15 January 849) was the eldest son of the Byzantine emperor Michael I Rhangabe (r. 811–813) and grandson, on his mother's side, of Nikephoros I (r. 802–811). He was junior co-emperor alongside his father for the duration of the latter's reign, and was tonsured, castrated, and exiled to Plate Island after his overthrow, under the monastic name Eustratius.

Virgin (title)

The title Virgin (Latin Virgo, Greek Παρθένος) is an honorific bestowed on female saints and blesseds in both the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church.

Chastity is one of the seven virtues in Christian tradition, listed by Pope Gregory I at the end of the 6th century. In 1 Corinthians, Saint Paul suggests a special role for virgins or unmarried women (ἡ γυνὴ καὶ ἡ παρθένος ἡ ἄγαμος) as more suitable for "the things of the Lord" (μεριμνᾷ τὰ τοῦ κυρίου).

In 2 Corinthians 11:2, Paul alludes to the metaphor of the Church as Bride of Christ by addressing the congregation

"I have espoused you to one husband, that I may present you as a chaste virgin to Christ".

In the theology of the Church Fathers, the prototype of the sacred virgin is Mary, the mother of Jesus, consecrated by the Holy Spirit at Annunciation.

Although not stated in the gospels, the perpetual virginity of Mary was widely upheld as a dogma by the Church Fathers from the 4th century.

Zechariah (Hebrew prophet)

Zechariah was a person in the Hebrew Bible and traditionally considered the author of the Book of Zechariah, the eleventh of the Twelve Minor Prophets. He was a prophet of the Kingdom of Judah, and, like the prophet Ezekiel, was of priestly extraction.

Virgin Mary
Apostles
Archangels
Confessors
Disciples
Doctors
Evangelists
Church
Fathers
Martyrs
Patriarchs
Popes
Prophets
Virgins
See also

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