Michael Graydon

Air Chief Marshal Sir Michael James Graydon, GCB, CBE (born 24 October 1938) is a retired Royal Air Force (RAF) officer. He was a fast jet pilot in the 1960s, a squadron commander in the 1970s and a station commander in the 1980s before serving as Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief RAF Strike Command during the Gulf War. He was Chief of the Air Staff from 1992 to 1997 in which role he advised the British Government on the implementation of No Fly Zones in Iraq and Bosnia and implemented the Front Line First initiative.

Sir Michael James Graydon
Born24 October 1938 (age 80)
Kew, Surrey
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branchRoyal Air Force
Years of service1957–97
RankAir Chief Marshal
Commands heldChief of the Air Staff (1992–97)
RAF Strike Command (1991–92)
RAF Support Command (1989–91)
RAF Stanley (1983–84)
RAF Leuchars (1981–83)
No. 11 Squadron (1977–79)
Battles/warsGulf War
AwardsKnight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath
Commander of the Order of the British Empire
Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air

RAF career

The son of James Julian Graydon and Rita Mary Graydon (née Alkan), Graydon was educated at Wycliffe College, in the town of Stonehouse in Gloucestershire, and became a flight cadet at the Royal Air Force College Cranwell in January 1957[1] before being commissioned into the Royal Air Force on 15 December 1959.[2] His potential as a flying instructor was noticed early in his career and, after completing his Qualified Flying Instructor course at the Central Flying School, he was posted to No. 1 Flying Training School at RAF Linton-on-Ouse in Yorkshire in 1960.[3] Promoted to flying officer on 15 December 1960,[4] he attended No. 229 Operational conversion unit where he gained experience on the Hunters[1] before being sent to No. 56 Squadron at RAF Wattisham, from where he flew Lightnings, in 1962.[3]

Lightning.inflight.arp.750pix
English Electric Lightning, a type flown by Graydon in the 1960s

Graydon was promoted to flight lieutenant on 15 June 1962.[5] He became a qualified flying instructor at No. 226 Operational conversion unit in November 1964.[3] He became a flight commander at No. 56 Squadron in April 1967,[3] based at RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus.[6] Having been awarded the Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air in the 1967 Birthday Honours,[7] he was promoted to squadron leader on 1 January 1968.[8]

Graydon attended RAF Staff College in 1970 and became Personal Staff Officer to the Deputy Commander-in-Chief Allied Forces Central Europe in 1971 before joining the Air Staff in the Directorate of Operations at the Ministry of Defence in 1973.[3] Promoted to wing commander on 1 July 1975,[9] he attended the National Defence College at Latimer in 1976.[3]

Graydon became Officer Commanding No. 11 Squadron at RAF Binbrook in July 1977[3] and military advisor to the Chief of the Defence Staff in 1979.[3] Promoted to group captain on 1 July 1980,[10] he became Station Commander at RAF Leuchars in 1981 and at RAF Stanley in the Falkland Islands in 1983.[3] He was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire in the 1984 New Year Honours[11] and attended the Royal College of Defence Studies later that year.[3]

Promoted to air commodore on 1 July 1984,[12] Graydon became Senior Air Staff Officer at Headquarters No. 11 Group at RAF Bentley Priory in January 1985.[3] He went on to be Assistant Chief of Staff at the Policy Division at Headquarters SHAPE in June 1986[3] and was promoted to air vice marshal on 1 July 1986.[13] Promoted to air marshal on 5 April 1989,[14] he was appointed Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief at RAF Support Command that month[3] and appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath in the 1989 Birthday Honours.[15] Promoted to air chief marshal on 31 May 1990,[16] he became Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief at RAF Strike Command serving in that role during the Gulf War in 1991.[3]

Graydon became Chief of the Air Staff in November 1992, was appointed Air Aide-de-Camp on 15 December 1992[17] and advanced to Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath in the 1993 New Year Honours.[18] As Chief of the Air Staff he advised the British Government on the implementation of No Fly Zones in Iraq and Bosnia.[19] He was also implemented the Front Line First initiative launched in July 1994 which contributed to reducing the RAF manpower from around 75,000 to around 53,000.[20] He retired from the Royal Air Force in April 1997.[3]

Later life

In retirement, Graydon has been a non-executive director of Thales plc and Symbiotics.[3] He has also been member of the council of the Air League since 2007, Vice-Patron of the Air Cadet Council since 1999, President of the Battle of Britain Memorial Trust since 1999, Chairman of the Air Squadron since 2005 and Deputy Chairman of the Church Schools Company since 2003.[3] Additionally he has been Vice-Chairman of the Governors of Wycliffe College since 1992.[3]

In 2006, Graydon expressed his belief that action was required to end the isolation of Northern Cyprus.[21] As a trustee of the British Cyprus Memorial Trust, he provided support for the campaign for a memorial, erected on 8 November 2009, to all British servicemen who died in service in Cyprus during the conflict in between 1956 and 1960.[22] Then in 2010/11, Graydon won approval from the North Cyprus government and the Royal British Legion to establish a branch of the Royal British Legion in North Cyprus: on 1 October 2011 the branch was officially formed with Graydon as President.[23]

Personal life

In 1963 he married Margaret Elizabeth Clark; they have no children.[24] His interests include golf, flying and reading.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b "Air Chief Marshal Graydon". Air of Authority – A History of RAF Organisation. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  2. ^ "No. 41950". The London Gazette (Supplement). 5 February 1960. p. 1012.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Who's Who 2010, A & C Black, 2010, ISBN 978-1-4081-1414-8
  4. ^ "No. 42223". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 December 1960. p. 8721.
  5. ^ "No. 42707". The London Gazette (Supplement). 15 June 1962. p. 4933.
  6. ^ "At the end of a long road". Britain's small wars. Archived from the original on 18 December 2011. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  7. ^ "No. 44326". The London Gazette (Supplement). 2 June 1967. p. 6301.
  8. ^ "No. 44493". The London Gazette (Supplement). 29 December 1967. p. 82.
  9. ^ "No. 46621". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 June 1975. p. 8378.
  10. ^ "No. 48294". The London Gazette (Supplement). 1 September 1980. p. 12376.
  11. ^ "No. 49583". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 December 1983. p. 7.
  12. ^ "No. 49800". The London Gazette (Supplement). 9 July 1984. p. 9435.
  13. ^ "No. 50583". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 June 1986. p. 8719.
  14. ^ "No. 51696". The London Gazette (Supplement). 10 April 1989. p. 4296.
  15. ^ "No. 51772". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 June 1989. p. 2.
  16. ^ "No. 52548". The London Gazette (Supplement). 3 June 1991. p. 8596.
  17. ^ "No. 53135". The London Gazette (Supplement). 14 December 1992. p. 21065.
  18. ^ "No. 53153". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 June 1989. p. 2.
  19. ^ "Stephen Nolan". BBC. 15 May 2011. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  20. ^ "Parliamentary questions". Hansard. 23 April 1998. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  21. ^ "AGM keynote speaker Sir Michael Graydon says "Action not words needed on North Cyprus isolation"". Embargoed. 1 December 2006. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  22. ^ "Wo we are". British Cyprus Memorial. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  23. ^ "Royal British Legion Kyrenia Branch". Royal British Legion. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  24. ^ "How much does he earn?: No 5: Air Chief Marshal Sir Michael Graydon, Chief of Air Staff". The Independent. 14 November 1993. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
Military offices
Preceded by
Sir John Sutton
Commander-in-Chief Support Command
1989–1991
Succeeded by
Sir John Thomson
Preceded by
Sir Patrick Hine
Commander-in-Chief Strike Command
1991–1992
Preceded by
Sir Peter Harding
Chief of the Air Staff
1992–1997
Succeeded by
Sir Richard Johns
Andrew Pulford

Air Chief Marshal Sir Andrew Douglas Pulford, (born 22 March 1958) is a retired senior Royal Air Force (RAF) commander. A helicopter pilot with operational service in Northern Ireland, the Falklands War and Iraq War, Pulford commanded RAF Odiham and No. 2 Group, and served as Assistant Chief of Defence Staff Operations, before taking up the post of Deputy Commander-in-Chief Personnel at Air Command and Air Member for Personnel in 2010. He became Chief of the Air Staff on 31 July 2013, retiring from the Royal Air Force on 12 July 2016.

Bugchasing

Bugchasing, also known in slang as charging, is the practice, typically among gay men or men who have sex with men, of pursuing sexual activity with HIV-positive individuals in order to contract HIV. Individuals engaged in this activity are referred to as bugchasers. It is a form of self-harm. Bugchasers seek sexual partners who are HIV-positive for the purpose of having unprotected sex and becoming HIV-positive; giftgivers are HIV-positive individuals who comply with the bugchasers' efforts to become infected with HIV.

Bugchasers indicate various reasons for this activity. Some bugchasers engage in the activity for the excitement and intimacy inherent in pursuing such a dangerous activity, but do not implicitly desire to contract HIV. Some researchers suggest that the behavior may stem from a "resistance to dominant heterosexual norms and mores" due to a defensive response by gay men to repudiate stigmatization and rejection by society.Some people consider bugchasing "intensely erotic" and the act of being infected through the "fuck of death" as the "ultimate taboo, the most extreme sex act left." People who are HIV negative and in a relationship with someone who is HIV-positive may seek infection as a way to remain in the relationship, particularly when the HIV-positive partner may wish to break up to avoid infecting the HIV negative partner.Others have suggested that some people who feel lonely desire the nurturing community and social services that support people with HIV/AIDS. It has also been used as a form of suicide.

Chief of the Air Staff's Warrant Officer

The Chief of the Air Staff's Warrant Officer (CASWO) is the senior warrant officer (WO), and therefore the most senior non-commissioned position in the Royal Air Force (RAF). The person holding this military appointment advises the Chief of the Air Staff (CAS) on matters concerning airmen and airwomen of the RAF. The post was created in 1996.

Chief of the Air Staff (United Kingdom)

The Chief of the Air Staff (CAS) is the professional head of the Royal Air Force and a member of both the Chiefs of Staff Committee and the Air Force Board. The post was created in 1918 with Major General Sir Hugh Trenchard as the first incumbent. The current and 30th Chief of the Air Staff is Air Chief Marshal Michael Wigston, who succeeded Sir Stephen Hillier in July 2019.

John Sutton (RAF officer)

Air Marshal Sir John Matthias Dobson Sutton, (9 July 1932 – 21 November 2014) was a Royal Air Force officer who served as Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief at RAF Support Command from 1986 to 1989 and Lieutenant Governor of Jersey from 1990 to 1995.

John Thomson (RAF officer)

Air Chief Marshal Sir Charles John Thomson, (7 June 1941 – 10 July 1994), usually Sir John Thomson, was a senior officer in the Royal Air Force (RAF).

Keith Williamson

Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Keith Alec Williamson, (25 February 1928 – 2 May 2018) was a senior officer in the Royal Air Force. He served with the Royal Australian Air Force flying Meteors in a ground attack role during the Korean War. He was a squadron commander and then a station commander during the 1960s and a senior air commander in the 1980s. He was Chief of the Air Staff during the early 1980s at the time of the emergency airlift of food and supplies to Ethiopia ("Operation Bushel").

Michael Vandort

Michael Graydon Vandort (born 19 January 1980 in Colombo) is a Sri Lankan cricketer. He is a left-handed batsman and a right-arm medium-pace bowler. He is one of the tallest batsmen ever to play test cricket and stands at 6 feet 5 inches.

Michael Wigston

Air Chief Marshal Michael Wigston, (born 25 February 1968) is a senior Royal Air Force officer, serving as Chief of the Air Staff since 26 July 2019. He previously served as Assistant Chief of the Air Staff from 2017 to 2018, and Deputy Commander (Personnel) and Air Member for Personnel and Capability from 2018 to 2019.

Operation Granby

Operation GRANBY, commonly abbreviated Op GRANBY, was the code name given to the British military operations during the 1991 Gulf War. 53,462 members of the British Armed Forces were deployed during the conflict. The total cost of operations was £2.434 billion (1992), of which at least £2.049 billion was paid for by other nations such as Kuwait and Saudi Arabia; £200 million of equipment was lost or written off.The Joint Commander Gulf Forces, based in the United Kingdom at RAF High Wycombe, was Air Chief Marshal (ACM) Sir Patrick Hine 1 October 1990 – 31 March 1991, and Air Chief Marshal Sir Michael Graydon from 31 March 1991. His political adviser was Andrew Palmer. The Commander British Forces Middle East, the in-theatre commander, based in Riyadh, was initially Air Vice Marshal (AVM) Andrew Wilson (September–October 1990), then Lieutenant-General Sir Peter de la Billière 6 October 1990 – March 1991, and Air Commodore Ian Macfadyen from March 1991.

The Air Commander British Forces Middle East, initially Arabian Peninsula, was Air Vice Marshal Andrew Wilson from August to 17 November 1990, then Air Vice Marshal William (Bill) Wratten from 17 November 1990.

The Senior British Naval Officer Middle East was Captain Anthony McEwen, Royal Navy until September 1990, on HMS York, then Commodore Paul Haddacks from September to December 1990. Finally, Commodore Christopher Craig, on HMS Brave and HMS London, was in command from 3 December 1990 to March 1991.

Patrick Hine

Air Chief Marshal Sir Patrick Bardon Hine, is a former senior Royal Air Force commander. Most notably, he was joint commander of all British forces during the Gulf War.

Peter Harding (RAF officer, born 1933)

Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Peter Robin Harding, (born 2 December 1933) is a retired Royal Air Force officer who served as a bomber pilot in the 1950s, a helicopter squadron commander in the 1960s and a station commander in the 1970s. He became Chief of the Air Staff in 1988 and served in that role during the Gulf War in 1991. He became Chief of the Defence Staff in December 1992 but resigned after his affair with Lady (Bienvenida) Buck, the wife of Conservative MP Antony Buck, became public.

RAF Strike Command

The Royal Air Force's Strike Command was the military formation which controlled the majority of the United Kingdom's bomber and fighter aircraft from 1968 until 2007 when it merged with Personnel and Training Command to form the single Air Command. It latterly consisted of two formations – No. 1 Group RAF and No. 2 Group RAF. The last Commander-in-Chief was Air Chief Marshal Sir Joe French.

RAF Support Command

Support Command was a command of the Royal Air Force.

It was formed on 31 August 1973 by the renaming of RAF Maintenance Command, with No. 90 (Signals) Group being added to it. Its responsibilities included all logistical and maintenance support requirements of the RAF. Among its first stations assigned may have been RAF Gan, transferred from Far East Air Force. It was renamed as RAF Support Command, and its role further increased, on 13 June 1977 when it absorbed Training Command, making it additionally responsible for all RAF ground and aircrew training.

In the 1980s the bunker at RAF Holmpton was converted to form a new Emergency War Headquarters for RAF Support Command.In 1994 the Command was split up, with many of its functions merging with those of the RAF Personnel Management Centre to form RAF Personnel and Training Command, and others being hived off into RAF Logistics Command.

Richard Johns

Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Edward Johns, (born 28 July 1939) is a retired senior Royal Air Force commander. He was a fighter pilot in the 1960s, commanding officer of a squadron during the 1970s and a station commander in the 1980s. Johns served as one of three British directors of operations on the senior planning staff for Operation Granby (the British contribution to the Gulf War) in 1991 and then acted as a supporting commander for joint operations in the Balkans in 1994. As Chief of the Air Staff he advised the British Government on the air force aspects of the Strategic Defence Review and on NATO's air campaign in Kosovo.

Stephen Hillier

Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen John Hillier, (born 1962) is a retired senior Royal Air Force officer, who served as Chief of the Air Staff from 2016 to 2019. He won the Distinguished Flying Cross for actions in the Gulf in 1999 and was awarded the United States Bronze Star Medal for service in the Iraq War. He went on to be Air Officer Commanding No. 2 Group, Director Information Superiority at the Ministry of Defence and then Deputy Chief of the Defence Staff (Capability). Hillier succeeded Air Chief Marshal Sir Andrew Pulford as Chief of the Air Staff on 12 July 2016.

Wycliffe College, Gloucestershire

Wycliffe College is a co-educational, independent, private day and boarding school in Stonehouse, Gloucestershire, England, founded in 1882 by G. W. Sibly. It comprises a Nursery School for ages 2–4, a Preparatory School for ages 4–13, and a Senior School for ages 13–18. In total, there are approximately 800 pupils enrolled at the school. The college is set in 60 acres of land. In 2018, The Duchess of Gloucester officially opened a new £6 million boarding house named Ward's-Ivy Grove.Wycliffe is a member school of The Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference (HMC). The Good Schools Guide stated that Wycliffe is "A school which offers a way of life as much as an education...A real gem of a school." The Independent Schools Inspectorate rated Wycliffe as either Excellent or Good in all areas in its most recent inspection (March 2016).For the academic year 2018-2019, Wycliffe charges up to £36,570 for boarders and £20,985 for day pupils in the senior school. Fees in the prep school are up to £28,260 for boarders and £15,795 for day pupils.

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