Merzario

Merzario was a Formula One and Formula Two team and constructor from Italy. The team participated in 38 Formula One World Championship Grands Prix but scored no championship points.

Merzario
Full nameTeam Merzario
Founder(s)Arturo Merzario
Noted driversItaly Arturo Merzario
Italy Alberto Colombo
Italy Gianfranco Brancatelli
Formula One World Championship career
First entry1977 Spanish Grand Prix
Races entered38
EnginesCosworth
Constructors'
Championships
0
Drivers'
Championships
0
Race victories0
Points0
Pole positions0
Fastest laps0
Final entry1979 United States Grand Prix

Formula One

1977

Merzario was set up in 1977 by former Ferrari, Williams and March driver Arturo Merzario when he could no longer find a drive with an established team. He initially campaigned a March 761B during 1977, his best result being 14th in the 1977 Belgian Grand Prix. This proved to be the only occasion in three years of participation in Formula One that one of their cars was classified at the finish of a World Championship Grand Prix. During the early part of the season Merzario's car was consistently the fastest of a number of March 761s on the grid,[1] though as the season wore on, he slipped down the grids and finally decided to abandon the season and concentrate on the following year and his new car.

1978

Merzario's first self-built Formula One effort, the A1, appeared in 1978 and was a basically conventional car based largely on his March 761B, with a red colour scheme and crude bodywork vaguely reminiscent of a Ferrari 312T2 in its use of cockpit-side ducting for an air intake. It used the then-common combination of the Cosworth DFV engine and Hewland gearbox. The livery changed from red to black before the 1978 Monaco Grand Prix,[1] though it was not until the Swedish Grand Prix that it finished a race, although unclassified, being eight laps adrift of the winner after a long pitstop. For the Austrian Grand Prix, a second A1 was unveiled, although it was suspected that this was actually the team's old March 761B with new bodywork.[1] With this car at his disposal, Merzario performed slightly better in qualifying but still failed to be classified in a race. For the Italian Grand Prix, both A1s were entered, with Alberto Colombo driving the original A1 and Merzario taking the newer second A1. Colombo posted the slowest time during qualifying and did not make the grid, while Merzario qualified comfortably, only for the engine to fail during the race. The team qualified the car on eight occasions during 1978, but retired seven times with mechanical failures.

1979

For the 1979 Formula One season the second A1 was revised into the A1B with more elegant bodywork and revised front suspension, and a new yellow and black livery. The A1B was the only Merzario to qualify for Grands Prix during 1979, which it did twice, though it retired on both occasions.

The A2 (designated A3 by some sources),[1][2] designed by Merzario and Simon Hadfield and based on the first A1, was ready in time for the European rounds of the 1979 season with the same engine and gearbox combination, and it had been modified into a ground effect 'wing' car. Only one example was built.[3] The A2 first took to the racetrack at the 1979 United States Grand Prix West in the hands of Arturo Merzario. Merzario qualified the car for the race but after the front suspension failed he had to start the race in the A1B. The car officially made its debut at the 1979 Spanish Grand Prix, where Merzario set the 26th time during qualifying and failed to make the race.[4] At the next race in Belgium, Merzario crashed during qualifying and broke his arm. For Monaco Merzario asked Gianfranco Brancatelli to drive his car, but Brancatelli failed to pre-qualify.[5] Merzario was back at the wheel at the French Grand Prix. He set the 26th time during qualifying and was more than two seconds slower than the last qualifier.[6] The A2 took to the track for the last time at the Austrian Grand Prix, after Merzario damaged the A4 in a practice accident.

By this time, Merzario had purchased the assets of the Kauhsen team (and their driver Brancatelli), arguably taking on cars even worse than his old March-based vehicle.[1] The Kauhsen was rebuilt by Giampaolo Dallara and renamed the Merzario A4.[7] The A4 employed the same Cosworth / Hewland running gear and the suspension was similar to the A2, but the bodywork was less bulky, with better sidepods for improved airflow. However, the car again failed to qualify for every Grand Prix that it entered, proving even slower than its predecessors. The only time the A4 was not the slowest car in qualifying was at the Italian Grand Prix, where Héctor Rebaque was seven tenths slower in his Rebaque HR100.[8] However, Merzario did qualify and race the car in the non-championship Dino Ferrari Grand Prix at Imola, where he finished 11th and last, two laps down.

After Formula One

After plans to modify the A4 into the A5 were not completed due to financial problems,[1] Merzario turned to constructing Formula Two cars. He was keen to point out that the engine bay of his 1980 BMW-engined M1 F2 machine could easily be modified to take a Cosworth DFV F1 engine, though no such effort was ever made.[3] The car was fairly unsuccessful in F2, and Merzario decided to return to running March chassis for 1981. With March 812s, the team finally scored two podiums in F2, with Piero Necchi at the wheel, but after a lacklustre 1982 season, Merzario again built his own cars for 1983 with minimal success. After moving down to Italian Formula 3, he finally moved away from team ownership in the mid-1980s.

Racing record

Complete Formula One results

(key)

Year Chassis Engine Tyres Drivers No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Pts WCC
1977 March 761B Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP MON BEL SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN JPN 0 NC
Italy Arturo Merzario 37 Ret DNQ 14 Ret Ret DNQ DNQ
1978 Merzario A1 Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW MON BEL ESP SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN 0 NC
Italy Arturo Merzario 37 Ret DNQ Ret Ret DNPQ DNPQ DNQ NC DNQ Ret DNQ DNQ Ret Ret Ret DNQ
Italy Alberto Colombo 34 DNPQ
1979 Merzario A1B Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA 0 NC
Italy Arturo Merzario 24 Ret DNQ DNQ Ret
Merzario A2 DNS DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ
Italy Gianfranco Brancatelli DNPQ
Merzario A4 Italy Arturo Merzario DNQ DNQ PO DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ

Complete Formula Two results

(key)

Year Chassis Engine Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1980 Merzario M1 BMW THR HOC NÜR VAL PAU SIL ZOL MUG ZAN PER MIS HOC
Italy Arturo Merzario Ret Ret Ret 9 Ret 16 17 DNS Ret
Italy Guido Daccò 11 Ret
Italy Piero Necchi Ret Ret 12 Ret Ret Ret Ret DNQ 12
1981 Merzario M1
March 812
BMW SIL HOC THR NÜR VAL MUG PAU PER SPA DON MIS MAN
Italy Piero Necchi DNS DNS 6 Ret Ret 3 3 11 7 Ret
Italy Gianfranco Trombetti 20 Ret Ret DNQ Ret Ret 12 12 12 13
Italy Arturo Merzario DNQ DNS Ret Ret
Italy Marco Brand DNQ Ret
Switzerland Loris Kessel DNPQ 19
Italy Guido Daccò Ret
Austria Jo Gartner DNQ 8
1982 Merzario 822 BMW SIL HOC THR NÜR MUG VAL PAU SPA HOC DON MAN PER MIS
Austria Jo Gartner 6 Ret 10 Ret Ret 7 Ret 15 7 Ret Ret
Italy Oscar Pedersoli Ret Ret 19 DNS Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret
France Richard Dallest DNS Ret 6 Ret
Germany Harald Brutschin 13 DNQ DNQ 17 Ret
Italy Guido Daccò 12 8 7 13
Italy Roberto Campominosi 10
Italy Lamberto Leoni 14
1983 Merzario M28 BMW SIL THR HOC NÜR VAL PAU JAR DON MIS PER ZOL MUG
Italy Fulvio Ballabio Ret Ret 14 Ret
Italy Guido Daccò Ret Ret 15
France Richard Dallest Ret Ret Ret 8 7 Ret 8
1984 Merzario M84 BMW SIL HOC THR VAL MUG PAU HOC MIS PER DON BRH
Italy Stefano Livio 10 13 12 Ret 13 Ret
Italy Aldo Bertuzzi Ret 12 DNS
Switzerland Max Busslinger 10

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Profile at F1 Rejects Archived July 25, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Brown, Allen. "Merzario A3 history". www.oldracingcars.com. Retrieved 22 February 2019.
  3. ^ a b David Hodges, "A-Z of Grand Prix Cars", Crowood, 2001, pp.170.
  4. ^ "1979 Spanish GP - Qualification". chicanef1.com. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  5. ^ "Possessed by the will to carry on". 8w.forix.com. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  6. ^ "1979 French GP - Qualification". chicanef1.com. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  7. ^ "Possessed by the will to carry on". 8w.forix.com. Retrieved February 7, 2016.
  8. ^ "1979 Italian GP - Qualification". chicanef1.com. Retrieved February 7, 2016.

External links

1973 24 Hours of Le Mans

The 1973 24 Hours of Le Mans was the 41st Grand Prix of Endurance and took place on 9 and 10 June 1973. It was the eighth round of the 1973 World Championship of Makes.

The race promised to be close, with Ferrari, Matra and Porsche all having two wins in the championship along with a surprise victory for Mirage at Spa. It did indeed turn out to be one of the most tense Le Mans, with the race won in the pits as both Ferrari and Matra took turns in the lead only to be stymied by mechanical failures. All three Ferraris had time in the lead, but as mechanical issues overtook them it was the Matra of Henri Pescarolo and Gérard Larrousse, despite its own tribulations, that took the chequered flag. In the end it was a comfortable six-lap margin over the second-placed Ferrari of Merzario and Pace with the Matra of Jabouille/Jaussaud third.

There was a certain symmetry for a French car and a French team winning the fiftieth anniversary of the first 24 Hours of Le Mans. Ferrari did win the GT category after a close tussle with Porsche, and BMW had the only finisher in the Group 2 Touring Car category.

1976 Italian Grand Prix

The 1976 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza in Monza, Italy on 12 September 1976. The race, contested over 52 laps, was the thirteenth round of the 1976 Formula One season. It was also the 45th running of the Italian Grand Prix, the 23rd which was a part of the World Championship. Ronnie Peterson took the March team's last victory in Formula One, and his only with the team. Ferrari driver Clay Regazzoni finished the race in second position and polesitter Jacques Laffite completed the podium for Ligier. This was the last time Ferrari entered more than two cars for a race.

The race saw the return of World Championship leader Niki Lauda to the sport after his serious crash at the German Grand Prix - he finished this race in fourth place.

1977 British Grand Prix

The 1977 British Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Silverstone on 16 July 1977. It was the tenth race of the 1977 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the 1977 International Cup for F1 Constructors.

The 68-lap race was won from pole position by local driver James Hunt, driving a McLaren-Ford, with Austrian driver Niki Lauda second in a Ferrari and Swedish driver Gunnar Nilsson third in a Lotus-Ford. The race marked the debut of Canadian driver Gilles Villeneuve, as well as the first outing for the first turbocharged Formula One car, the Renault RS01, driven by Frenchman Jean-Pierre Jabouille. It was also the last race to be given the honorific designation of the European Grand Prix.

1978 Dutch Grand Prix

The 1978 Dutch Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Zandvoort on 27 August 1978. It was the 13th race of the 1978 Formula One season.

1979 German Grand Prix

The 1979 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 29 July 1979 at Hockenheimring. The race, contested over 45 laps, was the tenth race of the 1979 Formula One season and was won by Alan Jones, driving a Williams-Ford, with team-mate Clay Regazzoni second and Jacques Laffite third in a Ligier-Ford. This was the second consecutive win for the Williams team, following Regazzoni's triumph at Silverstone two weeks previously.

Jean-Pierre Jabouille had taken pole position in his Renault, but spun off on the seventh lap in an ill-advised attempt at passing Jones on the outside. Jones had a leaky rear tire for the last twenty laps of the race, but Regazzoni received orders to stay behind. The one-two finish moved Williams into third place in the Constructors' Championship.

1982 European Formula Two Championship

The 1982 European Formula Two Championship was the sixteenth edition of the European Formula Two Championship, the main feeder series to Formula One. It was contested over 13 rounds and featured 22 different teams, 53 different drivers, seven different chassis and five different engines. Corrado Fabi won the championship in a works March-BMW after a season-long battle with teammate Johnny Cecotto and the Spirit-Honda of Thierry Boutsen.

1984 European Formula Two Championship

The 1984 European Formula Two season was contested over 11 rounds. 13 teams, 32 drivers, 8 chassis and 2 engines competed. Ralt driver Mike Thackwell clinched the championship title.

Alberto Colombo

Alberto Colombo (born 23 February 1946 in Varedo, Lombardy) is a former racing driver from Italy. He unsuccessfully entered three Formula One Grands Prix in 1978 with ATS (two failures to qualify) and Merzario (one failure to pre-qualify). He won the 1974 Italian Formula Three Championship and also enjoyed some success in Formula Two.

Arturo Merzario

Arturo Francesco "Art" Merzario (born 11 March 1943 in Civenna, Como) (erroneously registered as Arturio on his birth certificate) is a racing driver from Italy. He participated in 85 Formula One World Championship Grands Prix, debuting on 15 July 1972. He scored 11 championship points.

Frank Williams Racing Cars

Frank Williams Racing Cars was a British Formula One team and constructor.

Gianfranco Brancatelli

Gianfranco Brancatelli (born 18 January 1950 in Turin, Piedmont) is a former racing driver from Italy.

Guido Daccò

Guido Daccò (10 September 1942 – 29 July 2006) was an Italian race car and motorcycle racer from Limbiate. He began motorcycle racing in 1969 and from 1980-1984 he raced in Formula 2. He then drove in the 1985 24 Hours of Le Mans and began racing in Formula 3000. In 1988 he moved to the United States to drive in the Indy Lights series where he placed 10th in series points. In 1989 he made his CART debut for Dale Coyne Racing. Dacco had little success in CART and bounced from team to team until 1992, making 23 starts with a best finish of 12th. He failed to qualify for the Indianapolis 500 in his attempts in 1990 and 1991. He returned to Europe in 1992 to drive two races in German Formula 3 and then retired from racing. He made occasional drives in historic races and managed an FIA GT team.

He died on 29 July 2006, after a long battle with an undisclosed illness.[1]

Hesketh 308C

The Hesketh 308C was a Formula One racing car designed by Harvey Postlethwaite and used by Hesketh Racing in the latter stages of the 1975 Formula One season. The car featured the rubber suspension which Postlethwaite had pioneered on the preceding 308B model and a Ford-Cosworth DFV engine. In 1976, the car was acquired by Wolf–Williams Racing and rebranded as the Wolf–Williams FW05.

Jo Gartner

Josef Gartner (24 January 1954 – 1 June 1986) was a Formula One and sports car endurance driver from Austria. After a successful lower formula career, including a win in the Formula Two Pau Grand Prix, he participated in eight Formula One Grands Prix for Osella during the 1984 season, scoring no points. He was killed in an accident at the 1986 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Kauhsen

Kauhsen was a Formula One constructor from Germany, founded by former sportscar driver Willi Kauhsen. The team started in Formula Two in 1976, purchasing Renault cars, and raced with an assortment of drivers with limited success. Kauhsen then entered the 1979 Formula One season, spending 1978 designing their own chassis with Cosworth engines. They participated in two World Championship Grands Prix with Gianfranco Brancatelli, failing to qualify on both occasions, before the team was shut down.

MV Atlantic Freighter

MV Atlantic Freighter, now known as Pelagitis, is a roll-on/roll-off (Ro-Ro) ferry formerly operated by Marine Atlantic from North Sydney, Nova Scotia to Channel-Port aux Basques, Newfoundland, Canada. The vessel was completed in 1978 by Hyundai Shipbuilding Company Limited in and delivered to the Stena Line which operates in Northern Europe. She was sold on 12 March 2010 and given her current name Pelagitis.Throughout her career, the vessel sailed under the names, Merzario Grecia, Stena Grecia, and Tor Felicia.

Mugello Circuit

Mugello Circuit (Autodromo Internazionale del Mugello) is a race track in Scarperia e San Piero, Tuscany, Italy. Its length is 5.245 km (3.259 mi). It has 14 turns and a long straight (1.141 km (1,247.813 yd)). The circuit stadium stands have a capacity of 50,000.

Grand Prix motorcycle racing host an annual event here (MotoGP and smaller classes). Also, the Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters hold an annual event. The track is property of Scuderia Ferrari which uses it for Formula One testing. The first race of the A1GP 2008/09 season was originally planned to be held at the Mugello circuit on 21 September 2008. However, the race had to be cancelled due to the delay in building the new chassis for the new race cars.

Willi Kauhsen

Willibert "Willi" Kauhsen (born 19 May 1939) is a German former racing driver and racing team owner from Eschweiler in Aachen, Germany.

Williams FW

The Williams FW was a Formula One car used by Frank Williams Racing Cars during the 1973, 1974 and 1975 seasons. It was designed by John Clarke.

The car was initially designated in 1973 as the Iso–Marlboro IR and two examples started the season. One was destroyed in an accident at the 1973 German Grand Prix, and a replacement was built. When Marlboro and Italian sports car manufacturer Iso both withdrew their backing before the 1974 season, the two cars were renamed for 1974 as the Iso–Marlboro FW. Another example was completed during the 1974 season. These three surviving cars were renamed as Williams cars for 1975, and carried separate designations: FW01, FW02 and FW03, although the cars were of the same type.

2019 season
Former

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.