Merrimack County, New Hampshire

Merrimack County is a county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. As of the 2010 census, the population was 146,445,[1] making it the third-most populous county in New Hampshire. Its county seat is Concord,[2] the capital of New Hampshire. The county was organized in 1823 from parts of Hillsborough and Rockingham counties, and is named for the Merrimack River.[3] Merrimack County comprises the Concord, NH Micropolitan Statistical Area, which in turn constitutes a portion of the Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area. In 2010, the center of population of New Hampshire was located in Merrimack County, in the town of Pembroke.[4]

Merrimack County, New Hampshire
ConcordNH MerrimackCountyCourthouse 02
Merrimack County Courthouse
Map of New Hampshire highlighting Merrimack County

Location within the U.S. state of New Hampshire
Map of the United States highlighting New Hampshire

New Hampshire's location within the U.S.
Founded1823
Named forMerrimack River
SeatConcord
Largest cityConcord
Area
 • Total956 sq mi (2,476 km2)
 • Land934 sq mi (2,419 km2)
 • Water22 sq mi (57 km2), 2.3%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)151,132
 • Density162/sq mi (63/km2)
Congressional districts1st, 2nd
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.merrimackcounty.net

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 956 square miles (2,480 km2), of which 934 square miles (2,420 km2) is land and 22 square miles (57 km2) (2.3%) is water.[5] It is the third-largest county in New Hampshire by land area. The highest point in Merrimack county is Mount Kearsarge, on the border of Warner and Wilmot, at 2,937 feet (895 m).

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
183034,614
184036,2534.7%
185040,33711.3%
186041,4082.7%
187042,1511.8%
188046,3009.8%
189049,4356.8%
190052,4306.1%
191053,3351.7%
192051,770−2.9%
193056,1528.5%
194060,7108.1%
195063,0223.8%
196067,7857.6%
197080,92519.4%
198098,30221.5%
1990120,00522.1%
2000136,22513.5%
2010146,4457.5%
Est. 2018151,132[6]3.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2018[1]

2000 census

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 136,225 people, 51,843 households, and 35,460 families residing in the county. The population density was 146 people per square mile (56/km²). There were 56,244 housing units at an average density of 60 per square mile (23/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.08% White, 0.54% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.86% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.23% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. 1.00% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 16.5% were of English, 13.4% Irish, 12.7% French, 11.0% French Canadian, 8.4% American, 6.4% German and 6.0% Italian ancestry. 94.2% spoke English, 2.9% French and 1.1% Spanish as their first language.

There were 51,843 households out of which 33.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.90% were married couples living together, 9.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.60% were non-families. 24.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.90% under the age of 18, 8.10% from 18 to 24, 30.60% from 25 to 44, 24.00% from 45 to 64, and 12.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $48,522, and the median income for a family was $56,842. Males had a median income of $37,722 versus $27,207 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,208. About 4.10% of families and 5.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.60% of those under age 18 and 5.70% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 146,445 people, 57,069 households, and 38,104 families residing in the county.[12] The population density was 156.8 inhabitants per square mile (60.5/km2). There were 63,541 housing units at an average density of 68.0 per square mile (26.3/km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 95.3% white, 1.6% Asian, 1.0% black or African American, 0.3% American Indian, 0.3% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.6% of the population.[12] In terms of ancestry, 20.5% were English, 20.4% were Irish, 10.1% were German, 9.7% were Italian, 9.7% were French Canadian, 5.2% were Scottish, and 4.9% were American.[14]

Of the 57,069 households, 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.4% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.2% were non-families, and 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.94. The median age was 41.4 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $63,012 and the median income for a family was $75,268. Males had a median income of $50,880 versus $37,351 for females. The per capita income for the county was $30,544. About 5.2% of families and 8.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.6% of those under age 18 and 7.4% of those age 65 or over.[15]

Politics and government

County Commission

The executive power of Merrimack County's government is held by three county commissioners, each representing one of the three commissioner districts within the county.[17]

Districts Name Hometown Party
District 1 Tara Reardon (Chair) Concord, NH Democratic
District 2 Bronwyn Asplund-Walsh (Vice Chair) Franklin, NH Republican
District 3 Peter Spaulding (Clerk) Hopkinton, NH Republican

In addition to the County Commission, there are five directly-elected officials: they include County Attorney, Register of Deeds, County Sheriff, Register of Probate, and County Treasurer.[18]

Office Name
County Attorney Robin Davis (D)
Register of Deeds Susan Cragin (D)
County Sheriff Scott Hilliard (R)
Register of Probate Erica Davis (D)
County Treasurer Leo Bernier (D)

Legislative branch

The legislative branch of Merrimack County is made up of all of the members of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from the county. In total, as of August 2018 there are 45 members from 29 different districts.

Affiliation Members Voting share
Democratic Party 31 68.9%
Republican Party 14 31.1%
Total 45 100%

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Villages

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 14, 2011. Retrieved September 24, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-12-22. Retrieved September 15, 2008.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Centers of Population by State: 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 2, 2014.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  12. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  14. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  15. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved June 9, 2018.
  17. ^ http://sos.nh.gov/2016CountyGen.aspx?id=8589963657
  18. ^ http://www.merrimackcounty.net/links-and-contacts/16-links-contacts/41-merrimack-county-directory

External links

Coordinates: 43°18′N 71°41′W / 43.30°N 71.68°W

Bear Brook State Park

Bear Brook State Park is a 10,000-acre (40 km2)+ preserve located in Allenstown, New Hampshire, and surrounding towns. It is one of New Hampshire's largest state parks.

Amenities at Bear Brook include camp sites, a picnic area, over 40 miles (64 km) of hiking trails, swimming and fishing ponds, archery range, camp store, a ball field, playground, bathhouse, shelters, picnic tables, canoe and rowboat rentals, and a physical fitness course. The park is home to the New Hampshire Snowmobile Museum, Old Allenstown Meeting House, and the Richard Diehl Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Museum, which are located in historic buildings built by the Civilian Conservation Corps.The park takes its name from Bear Brook, a stream which runs through the park. Its environment is that of the Northeastern coastal forests ecoregion.

In 1985 and 2000, the remains of a total of four females were found in the park. In January 2017, a suspect in the case was identified as Terry Peder Rasmussen (also known by several aliases) who had died in prison in 2010. In June 2019, three of the females were identified.

Black Brook (Merrimack River tributary)

Black Brook is an 11.4-mile-long (18.3 km) stream located in southern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Merrimack River, which flows to the Gulf of Maine.

Black Brook begins at the outlet of Kimball Pond in Dunbarton, New Hampshire. The brook travels southeast into Goffstown and then Manchester, joining the Merrimack just upstream from Amoskeag Falls.

Blackwater Dam

For the dam and lake in Scotland, see Blackwater ReservoirBlackwater Dam is a dam in the town of Webster, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

The earthen dam was constructed in 1941 by the United States Army Corps of Engineers with a height of 69 feet (21 m) and 1,150 feet (350 m) long at its crest. It impounds the Blackwater River for flood control and storm water management as one of five related projects in the Merrimack River basin. The dam is owned and operated by the New England District, North Atlantic Division, Army Corps of Engineers.

The seasonal flood-control reservoir created by the dam has a maximum capacity of 93,400 acre-feet, but is normally dry, apart from the normal flow of the Blackwater. The site includes 8 miles (13 km) of river popular for canoeing and kayaking, and fishing for brown and rainbow trout.

Bow, New Hampshire

Bow is a town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 7,519 at the 2010 census.

Daniel Webster Birthplace State Historic Site

Daniel Webster Birthplace State Historic Site is a state park and historic house museum in Franklin, New Hampshire. It preserves the two-room log cabin associated with the 1782 birth and early childhood years of Daniel Webster, a noted orator and statesmen. The restored house reflects late 18th-century farm life.

The house is open seasonally on weekends.

Franklin Falls Dam

The Franklin Falls Dam is located on the Pemigewasset River in the city of Franklin, New Hampshire, in the United States. The dam was constructed between 1939 and 1943 by the Army Corps of Engineers and extends for 0.75 miles (1.21 km) across the river. During its construction, the neighboring residents of the town of Hill were forced to relocate to higher ground due to rising water levels created by the dam. The reservoir formed by the dam has a permanent pool covering 440 acres (180 ha), and the total flood storage capacity is 2,800 acres (1,100 ha). The total area of the project, including surrounding managed lands, is 3,683 acres (1,490 ha). The stretch of the Pemigewasset River potentially impounded by the dam extends 12.5 miles (20 km) north to Ayers Island Dam in the town of Bristol, and the watershed flowing to the dam extends north all the way into the White Mountains.

The Franklin Falls Reservoir hosts a variety of recreational activities, including hiking, mountain biking, fishing, kayaking, hunting, and snowshoeing.

Frazier Brook

Frazier Brook is a 7.7-mile-long (12.4 km) stream located in central New Hampshire in the United States. Via the Blackwater and Contoocook rivers, it is part of the Merrimack River watershed. It is subject to the New Hampshire Comprehensive Shoreland Protection Act.

Frazier Brook begins in Danbury, New Hampshire, just south of the town center, and flows south through the town of Wilmot into Andover. Eagle Pond and Bog Pond interrupt the brook's flow. Shortly below Bog Pond, the brook reaches the Blackwater River at the village of Cilleyville.

Frazier Brook is paralleled for most of its length by U.S. Route 4.

Hill, New Hampshire

Hill is a town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 1,089 at the 2010 census. It is home to William Thomas State Forest.

Hooksett, New Hampshire

Hooksett is a town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 13,451 at the 2010 census and an estimated 14,175 in 2017. The town is located between Manchester, the state's largest city, and Concord, the state capital. A prominent landmark is Robie's Country Store, a National Historic Landmark and a frequent stop for presidential candidates during the New Hampshire primary.The central village in town, where 4,147 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined as the Hooksett census-designated place and is located at a bridge crossing of the Merrimack River. The town also contains the census-designated place of South Hooksett.

Little Suncook River

The Little Suncook River is a 4.0-mile-long (6.4 km) river located in central New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Suncook River, part of the Merrimack River (and therefore Gulf of Maine) watershed.

The Little Suncook begins at the outlet of Northwood Lake in the town of Epsom, New Hampshire. Flowing west, it passes through Bixby Pond (also known as Cass Pond), passes the villages of Epsom and Gossville, and joins the Suncook River near the Epsom Traffic Circle.

U.S. Route 4 parallels the Little Suncook for the river's entire length.

Loudon, New Hampshire

Loudon is a town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 5,317 at the 2010 census. Loudon is the home of New Hampshire Motor Speedway.

The primary settlement in town, where 559 people resided at the 2010 census, is defined as the Loudon census-designated place and is located along the Soucook River at the southern terminus of New Hampshire Route 129.

Mount Kearsarge (Merrimack County, New Hampshire)

Mount Kearsarge is a mountain located in Wilmot, New Hampshire, and Warner, New Hampshire. Two state parks are located at the northern and southern bases of the mountain—Winslow State Park and Rollins State Park, respectively—and the entire mountain is within Kearsarge Mountain State Forest. On a very clear day, skyscrapers in the city of Boston 80 miles (130 km) away are visible from the fire tower on the summit. The summit has remained bare since a 1796 forest fire.

The name of the mountain evolved from a 1652 rendering of the native Pennacook tribal name for the mountain, Carasarga, which it is surmised means "notch-pointed-mountain of pines".

National Register of Historic Places listings in Merrimack County, New Hampshire

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.There are 88 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including 2 National Historic Landmarks.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted June 7, 2019.

Penacook, New Hampshire

Penacook, originally called "Fisherville", is a village within the city of Concord in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. It lies along Concord's northern border with Boscawen. The name comes from the Pennacook tribe that lived in the area. "Penacook" (Pennycook) was the original name of the plantation incorporated by present-day Concord.

Penacook is located along a stretch of the Contoocook River that falls 100 feet (30 m) in slightly over 1 mile (1.6 km), just before joining the Merrimack River. Early hydro-powered industry was attracted to the site, and Penacook grew as a mill town. While dams on the river still generate electricity, most of the 19th- and 20th-century factories, such as Allied Leather, have long since closed.Penacook has its own phone exchange (753), which includes a portion of Boscawen, and its own ZIP code (03303), shared with Boscawen, Webster, and parts of northern Concord east of the Merrimack River. Most of Penacook is located in the Merrimack Valley School District, though part is in the Concord School District.

Penacook Lake

Penacook Lake is a 362-acre (1.5 km2) lake located in Merrimack County in central New Hampshire, United States, in the city of Concord. It has also been known as "Long Pond". It serves as the water supply for Concord. Water that is not captured by the city's water treatment plant flows two-thirds of a mile to the Merrimack River.

Salisbury, New Hampshire

Salisbury is a town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 1,382 at the 2010 census.

Suncook River

The Suncook River is a 35.7-mile-long (57.5 km) river located in central New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Merrimack River, which flows to the Gulf of Maine.

The Fells

The Fells, also known as the Hay Estate, was originally the summer home of John Milton Hay, a 19th-century American statesman. It is located in Newbury, New Hampshire, on New Hampshire Route 103A, 2.2 mi (3.5 km) north of its junction with New Hampshire Route 103.

Tioga River (New Hampshire)

The Tioga River is a 12.8-mile-long (20.6 km) river located in the Lakes Region of central New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Winnipesaukee River, part of the Merrimack River watershed.

The Tioga River rises on the western slopes of the Belknap Mountains in Gilmanton, New Hampshire. Flowing west, the river quickly enters the town of Belmont, where it spends most of its existence. The river passes through Badger Pond shortly before reaching the village proper of Belmont, which was sited along the Tioga River in the 19th century for its waterpower. The river continues west, reaching a broad wetland along the Belmont-Northfield town line, and ends at the Winnipesaukee River near the outlet of Silver Lake.

New Hampshire Route 140 follows the general course of the river from Belmont village to the Winnipesaukee.

Gulf of Maine
Long Island Sound
Places adjacent to Merrimack County, New Hampshire
Municipalities and communities of Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States
Cities
Towns
CDPs
Other unincorporated
communities
Footnotes
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