Mel Hein

Melvin Jack Hein (August 22, 1909 – January 31, 1992), sometimes known as "Old Indestructible",[1][2] was an American football player and coach. In the era of one-platoon football, he played as a center (then a position on both offense and defense) and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1963 as part of the first class of inductees. He was also named to the National Football League (NFL) 50th and 75th Anniversary All-Time Teams.

Hein played college football as a center for the Washington State Cougars football team from 1928 to 1930. He led the 1930 Washington State team to an undefeated record in the regular season and received first-team All-Pacific Coast and All-American honors.

Hein next played 15 seasons in the NFL as a center for the New York Giants from 1931 to 1945. He was selected as a first-team All-Pro for eight consecutive years from 1933 to 1940 and won the Joe F. Carr Trophy as the NFL's Most Valuable Player in 1938. He was the starting center on NFL championship teams in 1934 and 1938 and played in seven NFL championship games (19331935, 19381939, 1941, and 1944).

Hein also served as the head football coach at Union College from 1943 to 1946 and as an assistant coach for the Los Angeles Dons of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) from 1947 to 1948, the New York Yankees of the AAFC in 1949, the Los Angeles Rams in 1950, and the USC Trojans from 1951 to 1965. He was also the supervisor of officials for the American Football League from 1966 to 1969 and for the American Football Conference from 1970 to 1974.

Mel Hein
Mel Hein
No. 7
Position:Center, linebacker
Personal information
Born:August 22, 1909
Redding, California
Died:January 31, 1992 (aged 82)
San Clemente, California
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:225 lb (102 kg)
Career information
High school:Burlington
(Burlington, Washington)
College:Washington State
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Hein was born in 1909 at Redding in Shasta County, California.[3] His father, Herman Hein (1886-1940), was a California native of German and Dutch ancestry who worked as an electrician for a power house operator. His mother, Charlotte Hein (1887-1967), was a California native of English and German ancestry. As of 1910, the family was living at Round Mountain, about 30 miles northeast of Redding.[4]

By 1920, the family was living in Glacier in Whatcom County, Washington, where Hein's father was working as a lineman on transmission lines.[5] Hein had an older brother, Lloyd, and two younger brothers, Homer and Clayton.[6] The family later moved to Fairhaven and Burlington, Washington, where Hein's father worked as an insurance agent and where Hein attended both Fairhaven and Burlington High Schools.[3][6] He also played basketball as a center at Burlington High.

Washington State

In 1927, Hein enrolled at Washington State College (later renamed Washington State University) in Pullman, Washington. He played at the center position for the Washington State Cougars football team from 1928 to 1930.[7] With Hein as the starting center, the Cougars compiled a 10–2 record in 1929 and 9–1 in 1930. The 1930 team won the Pacific Coast Conference championship and went through the regular season without a loss before losing to Alabama in the 1931 Rose Bowl.[8] Hein played all 60 minutes of the Cougars' back-to-back victories over California and USC on October 4 and 11, 1930.[9]

At the end of his senior year, Hein was selected by the Associated Press and United Press as the first-team center on the 1930 All-Pacific Coast football team.[10][11] He was also selected by the Central Press as the first-team center,[12] and by the All-America Board in a tie for the first-team center position,[13] on the 1930 College Football All-America Team.

While at Washington State, Hein also played for three years (freshman, sophomore, and junior years) on the Washington State Cougars men's basketball team and for one year on the school's track team as a freshman.[14]

New York Giants

In 1931, Hein signed a contract with the New York Giants,[15] married his college sweetheart,[16] and packed all of their belongings into a 1929 Ford and drove from Pullman to New York.[17] He played for 15 years as a center and a defensive lineman. Hein was a first-team All-Pro center eight straight years from 1933 to 1940. He was also selected as the NFL's most valuable player in 1938. He was the starting center on two NFL championship teams — in 1934 (NYG 30, Chicago 13) and again in 1938 (NYG 23, Green Bay 17). Hein was also a member of five Giants teams that lost NFL championship games — 1933, 1935, 1939, 1941, and 1944.

Hein had planned to retire after a dozen years in the NFL and become the head coach at Union College in Schenectady, New York.[18] When the football program went on hiatus due to World War II, Hein returned to the Giants on weekends for three more seasons and retired after the 1945 season.[19]

Coaching and administrative career

Hein worked as a football coach and league administrator for more than 30 years. He began coaching in 1943 as the head football coach at Union College in Schenectady, New York. For the next three years, he held that position, though the 1943 and 1945 Union College teams had their seasons cancelled due to the disruption of losing many players to World War II.[20][21][22] In 1944, the team compiled an 0–5 record,[20] as Hein coached the team on Saturdays and played for the Giants on Sundays.[1] In 1946, Hein continued as Union College's head coach after retiring from the Giants.[23] He led the 1946 team to a 3–5 record.[20]

In March 1947, Hein was hired as an assistant coach with the Los Angeles Dons of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC).[24] He served initially under head coach Dudley DeGroot on the 1947 Dons team. However, on November 18, 1947, DeGroot was fired as head coach, and assistant coaches Hein and Ted Shipkey were appointed as co-coaches to lead the team for the final three games of the season.[25] The 1947 Dons compiled a 5-6 record under DeGroot and a 2-1 record under Hein and Shipkey.[26] Hein resumed his position as an assistant coach under Jimmy Phelan on the 1948 Dons team that again compiled a 7-7 record.[27]

After two years with the Dons, Hein was hired in February 1949 as an assistant coach for the New York Yankees of the AAFC under head coach Red Strader.[28] The 1949 Yankees compiled an 8-4 record and finished in second place in the AAFC. The Yankees' forward wall, which was coached by Hein, was rated as the toughest in the AAFC.[29]

Hein returned to Los Angeles in 1950 as the line coach for the Los Angeles Rams.[29] Under head coach Joe Stydahar, the 1950 Rams won the NFL National Conference championship with a 9–3 record but lost to the Cleveland Browns in the 1950 NFL Championship Game.

Hein left the Rams in February 1951 to join the USC Trojans football team as its line coach under head coach Jess Hill.[30] Hein remained with the Trojans for 15 years through the 1965 season.[31] During his tenure with the program, the Trojans won a national championship (1962) and four conference championships (1952, 1959 [co-championship], 1962, and 1964 [co-championship]).

In June 1966, Hein was hired by commissioner Al Davis as the supervisor of officials for the American Football League.[32] He remained in that position from 1966 to 1969 and continued thereafter as the supervisor of officials for the American Football Conference from 1970 to 1974.[1] He retired in May 1974 after more than 45 years in college and professional football.[31]

Honors

Hein received numerous honors for his accomplishments as a football player. His honors include the following:

  • In 1961, he was inducted into the Washington Sports Hall of Fame.[35] That same year, he also became the first athlete to receive Washington State's Distinguished Alumnus Award.[1]
  • In 1963, he was one of the 17 players, coaches, and founders who were inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as part of the charter class.[36]
  • In 1969, as part of the NFL's 50th anniversary, the Pro Football Hall of Fame selected all-decade teams for each of the league's first five decades. Hein was selected as a center on the NFL 1930s All-Decade Team.[37] He was also named to the NFL 50th Anniversary All-Time Team.[38]
  • In 1979, he was inducted as a charter member into the Washington State University Athletic Hall of Fame.[40]
  • In 1999, he was also ranked 74th on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players.[43]
  • In 2010, the NFL Network ranked Hein 96th on its list of the 100 greatest players of all time.[44][45]
  • Hein's jersey number 7 was retired by both the Washington State Cougars and New York Giants.

Family and later years

Hein was married in August 1931 to Florence Emma Porter of Pullman, Washington.[46][16] They had two children, Sharen Lynn, born c. 1939, and Mel Hein, Jr., born c. 1940.[30] Mel, Jr., once held the United States indoor record in the pole vault in the 1960s.[47]

In his later years, Hein lived in San Clemente, California.[48] By 1991, Hein was suffering from stomach cancer, and his weight dropped from 225 to 130 pounds.[21] Hein died of stomach cancer in 1992 at age 82 at his home in San Clemente.[21][49]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Mel "Old Indestructible" Hein". College Football Hall of Fame. Football Foundation. Retrieved May 17, 2017.
  2. ^ Jason Krump. "Old Indestructible". wsucougars.com. Washington State University. Retrieved May 18, 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Mel Hein Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 18, 2017.
  4. ^ 1910 U.S. Census entry for Herman and Charlotte Hein. Son Melvin H., 7 months old. Census Place: Round Mountain, Shasta, California; Roll: T624_107; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 0092; FHL microfilm: 1374120. Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line].
  5. ^ 1920 U.S. Census entry for Herman and Charlotte Hein. Son Melvin J., age 10, born in California. Census Place: Glacier, Whatcom, Washington; Roll: T625_1944; Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 254; Image: 243. Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line].
  6. ^ a b 1930 U.S. Census entry for Herman and Charlotte Hein. Son Melvin, age 20.
  7. ^ Missildine, Harry (October 10, 1976). "The all-time Cougar – Mel Hein". Spokesman-Review. p. 1, sports.
  8. ^ "Alabama swamps Cougars under in Rose Bowl game 24–0". Palm Beach Post. Associated Press. January 2, 1931. p. 3.
  9. ^ "Mel Hein Holds Endurance Mark During Career". Oakland Tribune. November 16, 1930. p. 25 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "All-Pacific Coast Football Selections". The Helena Daily Independent. December 5, 1930. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ Vincent Mahoney (November 28, 1930). "United Press Selects Stars On West Coast". The Ogden Standard-Examiner. p. 18 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ William Ritt (December 13, 1930). "Football Captains' Own All-American! College Players Themselves Select All-Star Eleven for 1930 Season in Nation-wide Poll". Hamilton (OH) Evening Journal. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ Christy Walsh (December 11, 1932). "All-America Board Honors Capt. Bob Smith of Colgate". Syracuse Herald – via NewspaperArchive.com.
  14. ^ The Chinook 1931, page 101.
  15. ^ "Mel Hein signs contract to play pro football with New York Giants this year". Spokane Daily Chronicle. May 30, 1931. p. 12.
  16. ^ a b "Mel Hein to wed Pullman co-ed". Spokane Daily Chronicle. August 15, 1931. p. 12.
  17. ^ "Changes in pro football for better says Mel Hein". Spokesman-Review. November 20, 1966. p. 2, sports.
  18. ^ "Mel Hein to coach Union". Deseret News. Associated Press. June 22, 1942. p. 9.
  19. ^ Anderson, Dave (February 3, 1992). "Hein a Giant figure in football's history". Spokane Chronicle. (New York Times). p. C1.
  20. ^ a b c "Union Football Year-by-Year". Union College. Retrieved May 17, 2017.
  21. ^ a b c Dave Anderson (February 3, 1992). "Mel Hein Transcends All Eras". The New York Times.
  22. ^ "Mel Hein Finally Benched - Is Coach". The Evening Observer, Dunkirk, NY. September 12, 1946. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ "Mel Hein plans to quit pro football". The Daily Times. Beaver, Pennsylvania. United Press. January 10, 1946. p. 8.
  24. ^ Braven Dyer (March 18, 1947). "Mel Hein Named As Assistant Don Coach". Los Angeles Times. p. 6 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "DeGroot Is Fired as Coach of Los Angeles 'Pro' Dons: Mel Hein and Ted Shipkey Take Charge of Team Now At Hershey". The Morning Call. November 19, 1947. p. 19 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "1947 Los Angeles Dons Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 18, 2017.
  27. ^ "1948 Los Angeles Dons Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 18, 2017.
  28. ^ "Mel Hein Signs As Assistant Mentor Under Red Strader of New York Yanks". The Hartford Courant. February 13, 1949. p. C8 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ a b "Mel Hein Hired By Rams To Take Line Coaching Post". Los Angeles Times. March 5, 1950. p. II-16 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ a b "Trojans Sign Hein To Coach Grid Line". Los Angeles Times. February 16, 1951. p. 4-1 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ a b Red Smith (May 21, 1974). "An Iron Man Departs". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. p. 39 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ Sandy Padwe (June 9, 1966). "Mel Hein Is Back in Football". The Courier News (Blytheville, Arkansas). p. 8.
  33. ^ "Mel Hein Enters Grid Hall of Fame". The Oregon Statesman. October 11, 1954. p. 2-1 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ "Helms Puts Mel Hein in Hall". Pasadena (CA) Independent. December 22, 1960. p. B3 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "Football Inductees". Washington Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 17, 2017.
  36. ^ "Hein, Lambeau Make NFL 'Hall'". Los Angeles Times. January 29, 1963. p. 31 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "Hutson, Herber Top 1930's Team". The Pantagraph (Bloomington, IL). August 26, 1969. p. 11.
  38. ^ "Unitas at Quarterback as 'Moderns' Dominate Positions on All-Time NFL". The Town Talk (Alexandria, LA). September 7, 1969. p. D6 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ "Modern all-time college team named: Grange, Nagurski best of best". New Castle (PA) News. September 17, 1969. p. 36 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ "WSU Athletic Hall of Fame". Washington State University. Retrieved May 17, 2017.
  41. ^ "Very Best of the NFL". Detroit Free Press. August 24, 1994. p. 1D. Retrieved November 10, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.
  42. ^ "Walter Camp Football Foundation All-Century Team". Tallahassee (FL) Democrat. December 29, 1999. p. 24 – via Newspapers.com.
  43. ^ "Sporting News Football's 100 Greatest Players". Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, NY). August 15, 1999. p. 41 – via Newspapers.com.
  44. ^ "Top 100 Players of All Time". The Hartford Courant. November 7, 2010. p. E7 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  45. ^ "#96: Mel Hein The Top 100: NFL's Greatest Players". NFL Films. 2010. Retrieved May 18, 2017.
  46. ^ "Mel Hein To Wed Pullman Woman". Daily Capital Journal. August 15, 1931. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  47. ^ "Hein Takes Inside Track on Life After Close Call". Los Angeles Times. May 24, 2000.
  48. ^ "Where he is now: Mel Hein". Daily Record (Morristown, NJ). September 17, 1983. p. 53 – via Newspapers.com.
  49. ^ Robert McG. Thomas Jr. (February 2, 1992). "Mel Hein, 82, the Durable Center of the New York Football Giants". The New York Times.

Further reading

  • Richard Whittingham (1984). What a Game They Played: An Inside Look at the Golden Era of Pro Football. University of Nebraska Press. pp. 53–66. ISBN 0803298196. (Mel Hein autobiographical piece)

External links

1934 All-Pro Team

The 1934 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1934 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB) based on the composite view of the coaches of 10 NFL teams and a half dozen NFL officials, Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Five players were selected as first-team All-Pro players by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Chicago Bears halfback Beattie Feathers; Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; Chicago Bears end Bill Hewitt; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1934 NFL Championship Game

The 1934 National Football League Championship Game, also known as the Sneakers Game, was the second scheduled National Football League (NFL) championship game. Played at the Polo Grounds in New York City on December 9, it was the first title game for the newly created Ed Thorp Memorial Trophy. With a remarkable fourth quarter, the New York Giants defeated the Chicago Bears 30–13.The defending champion Bears entered the game undefeated at 13–0, with an 18-game winning streak. The Giants (8–5) won consecutive division titles, but had lost their final regular season game at Philadelphia. The Bears were favored to repeat as champions.A freezing rain the night before the game froze the Polo Grounds field. After Giants end Ray Flaherty remarked to head coach Steve Owen that sneakers would provide better footing on the frozen playing surface, Owen sent his friend Abe Cohen, a tailor who assisted on the Giants sideline, to Manhattan College to get some sneakers. There, Brother Jasper, the athletic director (and the later namesake of the Manhattan Jaspers) emptied the lockers of the school's basketball team. Cohen arrived in the third quarter with nine pairs of basketball sneakers from the college.The Bears led 10–3 at the half when the Giants switched to the basketball sneakers. A Chicago field goal was the only score in the third quarter, extending the lead to ten points. Early in the fourth, Giants quarterback Ed Danowski threw a touchdown pass to Ike Frankian to close the score to 13–10. (The pass was initially intercepted at the Bears' 2-yard line, but Frankian then grabbed the ball out of the defender's hands.) On the next New York drive, running back Ken Strong scored on a 42-yard touchdown run. Later an 11-yard run by Strong was turned into another touchdown for the Giants, and they scored for a final time on Danowski's 9-yard run, a fourth unanswered touchdown. New York outscored the Bears 27–0 in the fourth quarter to win 30–13.Many of the participants have been interviewed since the game took place, most notably Bronko Nagurski of the Bears and Mel Hein of the Giants. Generally, players from both sides have attributed the Giants' second half dominance to their selection of footwear. As Nagurski put it, "We immediately said something was wrong, because they suddenly had good footing and we didn't...they just out-smarted us." A mini-documentary of the game, narrated by Pat Summerall, can be seen in the 1987 video "Giants Among Men." NFL Films named the game the #8 bad weather game of all time.

1935 All-Pro Team

The 1935 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1935 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press (UP), the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. The following six players were selected to the first team by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; New York Giants halfback Ed Danowski; Chicago Cardinals end Bill Smith; Chicago Bears end Bill Karr; New York Giants tackle Bill Morgan; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1936 All-Pro Team

The 1936 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1936 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Four players were selected for the first team by all four selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Boston Redskins halfback Cliff Battles; Chicago Bears end Bill Hewitt; and Green Bay Packers guard Lon Evans. Three others were selected for the first team by three selectors: Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; Boston Redskins tackle Turk Edwards; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1937 All-Pro Team

The 1937 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1937 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the International News Service (INS), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Four players were selected for the first team by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Green Bay Packers fullback Clarke Hinkle; Washington Redskins tackle Turk Edwards; and Chicago Bears guard George Musso. Three others were named to the first team by four selectors: Washington Redskins Sammy Baugh (NFL, INS, UP, NYDN; selected as a halfback); Chicago Cardinals end Gaynell Tinsley (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN); and Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN). Three more were selected by three selectors: Washington Redskins halfback Cliff Battles (NFL, INS, NYDN); Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson (INS, CE, NYDN); and New York Giants center Mel Hein (NFL, INS, NYDN).

1938 All-Pro Team

The 1938 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1938 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the National Professional Football Writers Association (PFW), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Four players were selected for the first team by all five selectors: New York Giants halfback Ed Danowski; Green Bay Packers fullback Clarke Hinkle; New York Giants tackle Ed Widseth; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann. Another two were selected for the first team by four selectors: Brooklyn Dodgers quarterback Ace Parker (PFW, UP, INS, NYDN); Pittsburgh Pirates halfback Byron White (PFW, UP, INS, CE); and Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson (PFW, UP, INS, NYDN). Five players were selected for the first team by three selectors: Chicago Cardinals end Gaynell Tinsley (PFW, INS, CE); Philadelphia Eagles end Bill Hewitt (UP, CE, NYDN); Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar (UP, INS, NYDN); Green Bay Packers guard Russ Letlow (PFW, INS, CE); and New York Giants center Mel Hein (UP, INS, NYDN).

1940 All-Pro Team

The 1940 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1940 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the so-called "official" All-Pro team selected by 92 sports writers who were members of the Pro Football Writers Association of American (PFW), the sports writers of the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), the New York Daily News (NYDN), and the Chicago Herald American.Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Three players were selected for the first team by all seven selectors: Brooklyn Dodgers quarterback Ace Parker; Brooklyn Dodgers tackle Bruiser Kinard; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann. Four others were designated for the first team by six selectors: Cleveland Rams fullback Johnny Drake; Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson; Brooklyn Dodgers end Perry Schwartz; and New York Giants center Mel Hein. Another four players were selected by five of seven selectors: Detroit Lions halfback Byron White; Washington Redskins halfback Sammy Baugh; Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

A formation

In American football, the A formation was a variation of the single-wing formation used with great success by the New York Giants of the 1930s and early 1940s. This formation was masterminded by Giants coach Steve Owen and relied heavily upon Hall of Fame center Mel Hein for its success.

The A formation differed from the traditional single-wing in that the quarterback played further back from the line and closer to the center. It also place the backfield opposite the "strong" side of the unbalanced line, providing more flexibility in the running game (though less power). The wingback is on the opposite side compared to the single-wing and the quarterback is the primary passer, rather than the tailback. The name of the formation was arbitrary, not from its slight resemblance to the letter "A", unlike formations named "I", "T", "V", and "Y" for the shapes formed by the backs' positioning; Owen labeled the standard single wing his team's "B" formation.One major advantage of the A is the center could snap the ball to any of three players; typically to the fullback or blocking back for runs and the quarterback for passes. The fourth back, the wingback, became a crucial part of the system when Owen introduced a half-spin sweep series in 1938 which featured a wide sweep play to the motioning wingback, a dive inside by the deep fullback, and a bootleg threat away from sweep action by the quarterback. This triple-threat, highly deceptive series anticipated the Wing-T Buck Sweep series by well over a decade.A great center like Hein was a major asset, albeit not essential, in running the A formation — however only the Giants used this set-up with any frequency. This gave the Giants an advantage in that teams had to prepare specifically to defend the A whenever they played New York.

Coach Owen experimented with the A from the early 1930s on. Mel Hein joined the Giants in 1931, but Owen didn't use the A full-time until 1937. The Giants, using the A, became the first team to win their second official NFL championship games when they defeated the Green Bay Packers 23-17, adding this 1938 title to their 1934 defeat of Chicago. Green Bay ran the Notre Dame Box, another unique single-wing variant. The 1938 win was the last time the A brought the Giants a title, however, as George Halas' modern T formation began to dominate professional football after 1940. Mel Hein retired after the 1945 season and proved difficult to replace. The Giants and their A formation were beaten for the NFL championship by the Chicago Bears and the T in 1941 and 1946. Owen finally installed the T formation as an additional offense in 1948, although the Giants continued to run the A through his retirement in 1954. No other team used the A formation in the NFL and the offense today is used only by some aficionados at and below high school varsity level. Ted Seay is known to many of them as a coach who decades later developed greater passing possibilities from the nearly forgotten A.

Adrian Regnier

Adrian E. Regnier (August 28, 1889 – March 2, 1956) was an American football player and coach. He played college football at Brown University at the halfback and end positions from 1907 to 1909. He was the captain of the 1909 Brown Bears football team and was selected as a consensus All-American at the end position in 1909. Regnier also played baseball and basketball and was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. He graduated from Brown in 1910.In April 1910, he was hired as the football coach at Union College. He served one year as the head coach of the Union Dutchmen football team, compiling a record of 2–4–1.During World War I, he served in the United States Army. He was injured in approximately May 1918 while serving in a machine gun battalion of the New England Division. He later became a sales engineer. He died in March 1956 at Springfield Hospital in Wilbraham, Massachusetts.

Edgar M. Church

Edgar M. Church (born May 24, 1875) was an American college football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Union College in Schenectady, New York for one season, in 1895.

Fred Dawson

Frederick Thomas Dawson (April 26, 1884 – August 18, 1965) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Union College in Schenectady, New York (1912–1916), Columbia University (1918–1919), the University of Nebraska (1921–1924), the University of Denver (1925–1928), and the University of Virginia (1931–1933). Dawson also coached the basketball team at Columbia during the 1918–19 season and baseball at Princeton University in 1918 and at Columbia in 1919.

Gary Hein

Gary Mel Hein (born March 26, 1965 in Los Angeles) is a former American rugby union player. He played as a wing. He is grandson of the late New York Giants player and Pro Football Hall of Famer Mel Hein and son of the pole vaulter Mel Hein Jr., who briefly held the U.S. indoor pole vault record with a jump of 16'5 3/4" at the Cow Palace in San Francisco, California.

Joe F. Carr Trophy

The Joe F. Carr Trophy was the first award given in the National Football League (NFL) to recognize a most valuable player for each season. It was first awarded in 1938, known then as the Gruen Trophy, and renamed in 1939 in honor of NFL commissioner Joseph Carr. The Gruen Trophy, sponsored by Gruen Watch Co., was first awarded in 1937 to Dutch Clark of the Detroit Lions. However, both contemporary and modern sources consider the 1938 award the first retroactive Joe F. Carr Trophy, and thus the first NFL MVP award. Players were chosen by a panel of sportswriters who distributed first and second place votes. It was awarded until the 1946 season, and it remains the only MVP award the NFL has officially sanctioned.

List of American Football League officials

Just as it did in many other innovative ways, the American Football League (AFL, 1960–1969) had a unique take on the uniforms of referees, umpires, line judges, field judges and back judges. With their red-orange stripes, black collars and cuffs, and AFL logos on their shirt fronts, sleeves and caps, they were not only more colorful, but easier to see than those of the other league. They were especially unique when seen on color television, which was also on the rise in the 1960s. Both the National Football League and All-America Football Conference had used colored uniforms in the 1940s.

In his book COLORS, Jim Finks Jr., son of Pro Football Hall-of-Famer Jim Finks, Sr., shows the original uniform of AFL official Jack Reader, who was a back judge in the first AFL game in 1960 and in both the first and third AFL-NFL World Championship games. Reader was in an iconic January 20, 1969 Sports Illustrated photo, signaling a touchdown after Matt Snell's 4-yard plunge against the Colts.

The following list indicates men who were American Football League on-field officials: an important but seldom-credited part of the game. Nine, as shown in the list below, officiated in the American Football League for the entire ten years of its existence, 1960 through 1969. They were: Ben Dreith (FJ, R); Bob Finley (U, R); Hugh Gamber (BJ, FJ); Elvin Hutchison (HL); John McDonough (R); Walt Parker (U); Jack Reader (BJ, R); Al Sabato (HL) and George Young (U).

There were 34 on-field officials in the AFL in 1969, the league's last year of play. 32 of them were good enough to continue to officiate after the merger. One of them was Cal Lepore, now known as "the father of instant replay". He also promulgated the use of replay to review the accuracy of on-field calls, for the evaluation of officials. Another important link from the American Football League to today's professional football.

Bob Austin (AFL Supervisor of Officials, 1960–1965)

James Barnhill

Bob Baur

Peppy Blount

Harold Bourne

Gilbert Castree

Al Conway

Art Demmas

Clyde Devine

Ray Dodez

Ben Dreith (Ten-year American Football League official, 1960–1969)

Dick Eichhorst

George Ellis

Bob Finley (Ten-year American Football League official, 1960–1969)

Walt Fitzgerald

John Fouch

Kenny Gallagher

Hugh Gamber (Ten-year American Football League official, 1960–1969)

Fritz Graf

Gerald Hart

Mel Hein (AFL Supervisor of Officials, 1966–1969)

Al Huetter

Elvin Hutchison (Ten-year American Football League official, 1960–1969)

Hunter Jackson

Harry Kessel

Bill Kestermeier

Frank Kirkland

Joe Kraus

Cal Lepore

Charles Liley

Pat Mallette

Bo McAllister

Jack McLain

John McDonough (Ten-year American Football League official, 1960–1969)

George McGuane

Carl Mellinger

Leo Miles

Tommy Miller

John Morrow

Charlie Musser

George Parker

Walt Parker (Ten-year American Football League official, 1960–1969)

Jack Reader (Officiated the first AFL game in 1960. Ten-year American Football League official, 1960–1969)

Bob Rice

Frank Rustich

James Ryan

Al Sabato (Ten-year American Football League official, 1960–1969)

Ambrose Schindler

John Steffen

William Stein

Bill Summers

Paul Trepinski

Price Truitt

Dick Ulrich

Jack Vest

Tony Veteri

Aaron Wade

Bob Whetstone

Bob Wortman

Bill Wright

George Young (Ten-year American Football League official, 1960–1969)

National Football League 75th Anniversary All-Time Team

The National Football League 75th Anniversary All-Time Team was chosen by a selection committee of media and league personnel in 1994 to honor the greatest players of the first 75 years of the National Football League (NFL). Five players on the list were on NFL rosters at the time of the selections: Joe Montana, Jerry Rice, Rod Woodson, Reggie White, and Ronnie Lott. Gale Sayers was named to the team as both a halfback and kickoff returner. Every player is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, except for Billy "White Shoes" Johnson.

New York Giants

The New York Giants are a professional American football team based in the New York metropolitan area. The Giants compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team plays its home games at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey, which it shares with the New York Jets in a unique arrangement. The Giants hold their summer training camp at the Quest Diagnostics Training Center at the Meadowlands Sports Complex.The Giants were one of five teams that joined the NFL in 1925, and is the only one of that group still existing, as well as the league's longest-established team in the Northeastern United States. The team ranks third among all NFL franchises with eight NFL championship titles: four in the pre–Super Bowl era (1927, 1934, 1938, 1956) and four since the advent of the Super Bowl (XXI (1986), XXV (1990), XLII (2007), and XLVI (2011)), along with more championship appearances than any other team, with 19 overall appearances. Their championship tally is surpassed only by the Green Bay Packers (13) and Chicago Bears (9). Throughout their history, the Giants have featured 28 Hall of Fame players, including NFL Most Valuable Player (MVP) award winners Mel Hein, Frank Gifford, Y. A. Tittle, and Lawrence Taylor.

To distinguish themselves from the professional baseball team of the same name, the football team was incorporated as the "New York National League Football Company, Inc." in 1929 and changed to "New York Football Giants, Inc." in 1937. While the baseball team moved to San Francisco after the 1957 season, the football team continues to use "New York Football Giants, Inc." as its legal corporate name, and is often referred to by fans and sportscasters as the "New York Football Giants". The team has also acquired several nicknames, including "Big Blue", the "G-Men", and the "Jints", an intentionally mangled contraction seen frequently in the New York Post and New York Daily News, originating from the baseball team when they were based in New York. Additionally, the team as a whole is occasionally referred to as the "Big Blue Wrecking Crew", even though this moniker primarily and originally refers to the Giants defensive unit during the 80s and early 90s (and before that to the Los Angeles Dodgers baseball teams of the late 1970s and early 1980s).The team's heated rivalry with the Philadelphia Eagles is the oldest of the NFC East rivalries, dating all the way back to 1933, and has been called the best rivalry in the NFL in the 21st century.

Tom Cahill (American football)

Thomas B. Cahill (October 11, 1919 – October 29, 1992) was an American football player and coach who served as the head coach at the United States Military Academy from 1966 to 1973 and at Union College in Schenectady, New York from 1976 to 1979, compiling a career college football record of 51–59–3.

During his tenure as head coach at Army, his teams beat Navy five times. Following the 1966 season, the Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year award was bestowed upon Cahill. Cahill died on October 29, 1992 in Schenectady after a heart attack.

Turk Edwards

Albert Glen "Turk" Edwards (September 28, 1907 – January 12, 1973) was an American football tackle in the National Football League (NFL). He played his entire career for the Washington Redskins, starting with their first six seasons in Boston, and later became the head coach. Edwards was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1969.

Washington State Cougars football

The Washington State Cougars football program is the intercollegiate American football team for Washington State University, located in the U.S. state of Washington. The team competes at the NCAA Division I level in the FBS and is a member of the North Division of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12). Known as the Cougars, the first football team was fielded in 1894.

The Cougars play home games on campus at Martin Stadium in Pullman, Washington, which opened in 1972; the site dates back to 1892 when it was called Soldier Field. Its present seating capacity is 33,522. Their main rivals are the Washington Huskies. The Cougars and Huskies historically end each regular season with the Apple Cup rivalry game in late November. They are currently coached by Mike Leach.

Mel Hein—championships, awards, and honors

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