Meigs County, Ohio

Meigs County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 23,770.[2] Its county seat is Pomeroy.[3] The county is named for Return J. Meigs, Jr., the fourth Governor of Ohio.[4]

Meigs County, Ohio
Meigs County Courthouse comprehensive
Seal of Meigs County, Ohio

Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Meigs County

Location within the U.S. state of Ohio
Map of the United States highlighting Ohio

Ohio's location within the U.S.
FoundedApril 1, 1819[1]
Named forReturn J. Meigs, Jr.
SeatPomeroy
Largest villageMiddleport
Area
 • Total433 sq mi (1,121 km2)
 • Land430 sq mi (1,114 km2)
 • Water2.9 sq mi (8 km2), 0.7%
Population
 • (2010)23,770
 • Density55/sq mi (21/km2)
Congressional district6th
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 433 square miles (1,120 km2), of which 430 square miles (1,100 km2) is land and 2.9 square miles (7.5 km2) (0.7%) is water.[5] The Ohio River forms the eastern and southern boundaries of the county, the other side of which is located in West Virginia.

Meigs County lies in the Appalachian Plateau physiographic region of the Appalachian Mountains. The landscape is considered to be anywhere from gently rolling to rugged, typical of a dissected plateau. Elevations range from 1,020 feet (310 m) asl (above sea level) in the southwest to about 535 feet (163 m) asl in the far south central part of the county along the Ohio River. The majority of Meigs County is drained by two subwatersheds of the Ohio River, Shade River and Leading Creek. Another stream of note is Raccoon Creek, which flows through a small area of the northwestern corner of the county.[6]

Coal mining, both strip and underground, has been an important industry in Meigs County since the late 19th century, although mining of all types largely ceased by the 1990s. The effects of mining are still readily seen on the landscape today. Features such as high walls, spoil piles, and irregular topography are still prevalent. Many tributaries in the Leading Creek basin are plagued by acid mine drainage and sedimentation.

In 2009, Gatling, Ohio LLC invested $75 million to open a new coal mine and coal prep plant near Racine. It is capable of employing 120 to 150 miners, and is capable of producing 3.5 million marketable tons of coal per year.[7][8]

Climate

Meigs County's climate is considered humid continental, with warm to hot, humid summers and cool to cold, wet winters. Precipitation averages 41" annually, spread evenly throughout the year. High July temperatures average in the upper 80s F, while lows average in the low to mid 60s F. Temperatures above 90* F in the summer are common. January highs average about 40* F, with lows in the lower 20s. Temperatures around or even below 0* F occur during most winters. Snowfall averages 20–25", falling between late November and the first week of April.

The Ohio River creates a microclimate in its valley where temperatures tend to be moderated by the river, hence resulting in longer growing seasons compared to the rest of the county. Other microclimates, known as frost hollows or frost pockets, exist throughout the county in small isolated valleys. Nocturnal temperatures are often several degrees colder than the surrounding terrain.

Adjacent counties

State protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18204,480
18306,15837.5%
184011,45286.0%
185017,97156.9%
186026,53447.6%
187031,46518.6%
188032,3252.7%
189029,813−7.8%
190028,620−4.0%
191025,594−10.6%
192026,1892.3%
193023,961−8.5%
194024,1040.6%
195023,227−3.6%
196022,159−4.6%
197019,799−10.7%
198023,64119.4%
199022,987−2.8%
200023,0720.4%
201023,7703.0%
Est. 201723,080[9]−2.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790-1960[11] 1900-1990[12]
1990-2000[13] 2010-2017[2]

2000 census

As of the census[14] of 2000, there were 23,072 people, 9,234 households, and 6,574 families residing in the county. The population density was 54 people per square mile (21/km²). There were 10,782 housing units at an average density of 25 per square mile (10/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.73% White, 0.69% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.10% Asian, 0.25% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. 0.60% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 9,234 households out of which 31.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.90% were married couples living together, 10.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.80% were non-families. 25.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.90% under the age of 18, 8.40% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 25.20% from 45 to 64, and 14.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 94.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $27,287, and the median income for a family was $33,071. Males had a median income of $30,821 versus $19,621 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,848. About 14.30% of families and 19.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.30% of those under age 18 and 14.50% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 23,770 people, 9,557 households, and 6,698 families residing in the county.[15] The population density was 55.3 inhabitants per square mile (21.4/km2). There were 11,191 housing units at an average density of 26.0 per square mile (10.0/km2).[16] The racial makeup of the county was 97.4% white, 0.9% black or African American, 0.2% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.5% of the population.[15] In terms of ancestry, 25.1% were German, 14.3% were Irish, 13.9% were American, and 9.6% were English.[17]

Of the 9,557 households, 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.6% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 29.9% were non-families, and 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.91. The median age was 41.2 years.[15]

The median income for a household in the county was $33,407 and the median income for a family was $42,653. Males had a median income of $41,850 versus $27,271 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,003. About 16.7% of families and 20.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.9% of those under age 18 and 12.3% of those age 65 or over.[18]

Politics

Owing to its history as a settlement of the Yankee Ohio Company of Associates, Meigs County was rock-ribbed Republican for the first century following that party’s formation. Meigs County voted Republican in every Presidential election between 1856 and 1960. It was won four times by Democrats between 1964 and 1996 (although Bill Clinton who carried Meigs twice did so only with pluralities) but has become powerfully Republican again since 2000.

Education

Communities

Map of Meigs County Ohio With Municipal and Township Labels
Map of Meigs County, Ohio with municipal and township labels
MeigsCtyCourthouse PomeroyOH
Meigs County Courthouse

Villages

Townships

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Census-designated place

Other unincorporated communities

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Meigs County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 21, 2007. Retrieved April 28, 2007.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 14, 2011. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 204.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  6. ^ Ohio Atlas & Gazetteer. Yarmouth, Me.: DeLorme. 1991. pp. 79–80, 87. ISBN 0-89933-233-1.
  7. ^ "Pomeroy Daily Sentinel – Gatling investing million in mine facility". Mydailysentinel.com. Retrieved June 1, 2010.
  8. ^ "Coal Ties / Meigs County producing coal once again " Entangled Citizens". Spurse.org. May 18, 2009. Archived from the original on July 28, 2011. Retrieved June 1, 2010.
  9. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  12. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  14. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  15. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  16. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  17. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  18. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
  19. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 10, 2018.
  20. ^ "James Edwin Campbell". Remarkable Ohio. Ohio History Connection. Retrieved 12 September 2017.

Further reading

  • Thomas William Lewis, History of Southeastern Ohio and the Muskingum Valley, 1788-1928. In Three Volumes. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1928.

External links

Coordinates: 39°05′N 82°01′W / 39.08°N 82.02°W

Battle of Buffington Island

The Battle of Buffington Island, also known as the St. Georges Creek Skirmish, was an American Civil War engagement in Meigs County, Ohio, and Jackson County, West Virginia, on July 19, 1863, during Morgan's Raid. The largest battle in Ohio during the war, Buffington Island contributed to the capture of the famed Confederate cavalry raider, Brig. Gen. John Hunt Morgan, who was seeking to escape Union army pursuers across the Ohio River at a ford opposite Buffington Island.

Delayed overnight, Morgan was almost surrounded by Union cavalry the next day, and the resulting battle ended in a Confederate rout, with over half of the 1,700-man Confederate force being captured. General Morgan and some 700 men escaped, but the daring raid finally ended on July 26 with his surrender after the Battle of Salineville. Morgan's Raid was of little military consequence, but it did spread terror among much of the population of southern and eastern Ohio, as well as neighboring Indiana.

Bedford Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Bedford Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 1,212 people in the township.

Carpenter, Ohio

Carpenter is an unincorporated community in Meigs County, Ohio, United States, along Leading Creek.

Chester Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Chester Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 2,332 people in the township.

Columbia Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Columbia Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 1,018 people in the township.

Langsville, Ohio

Langsville is an unincorporated community in western Rutland Township, Meigs County, Ohio, United States, along Leading Creek. Although it is unincorporated, it has the ZIP code of 45741.

Lebanon Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Lebanon Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 1,029 people in the township.

Letart Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Letart Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, USA. The 2000 census found 641 people in the township.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Meigs County, Ohio

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Meigs County, Ohio.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in a Google map.There are 9 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted March 7, 2019.

Olive Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Olive Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 1,874 people in the township.

Orange Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Orange Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 934 people in the township.

Portland, Ohio

Portland is an unincorporated community in eastern Lebanon Township, Meigs County, Ohio, United States. Although it is unincorporated, it has a post office, with the ZIP code of 45770.It lies on the Ohio River, located below Long Bottom and above Racine.

Reedsville, Ohio

Reedsville is an unincorporated community in eastern Olive Township, Meigs County, Ohio, United States. Although it is unincorporated, it has a post office, with the ZIP code of 45772.It lies along the Ohio River, below Hockingport and above Long Bottom.

Rutland Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Rutland Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 2,347 people in the township, 1,946 of whom lived in the unincorporated portions of the township.

Salem Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Salem Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 944 people in the township.

Salisbury Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Salisbury Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 6,441 people in the township, 1,950 of whom lived in the unincorporated portions of the township.

Scipio Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Scipio Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 1,050 people in the township.

Shade River State Forest

Shade River State Forest is a state forest in Meigs County, Ohio. Forked Run State Park was carved out of it in 1949. Currently, this state forest comprises 2,475 acres (1,002 ha).

Sutton Township, Meigs County, Ohio

Sutton Township is one of the twelve townships of Meigs County, Ohio, United States. The 2000 census found 3,250 people in the township, 1,625 of whom lived in the unincorporated portions of the township.

Places adjacent to Meigs County, Ohio
Municipalities and communities of Meigs County, Ohio, United States
Villages
Townships
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