MediaWorks (publisher)

MediaWorks, Inc. (株式会社メディアワークス Kabushiki-gaisha MediaWākusu) was a Japanese publishing company in the Kadokawa Group known for their Dengeki (電撃, meaning electric shock) brand magazines and book labels. These included such well-known magazines as Dengeki Daioh, and Dengeki G's Magazine, along with MediaWorks' main light novel publishing imprint Dengeki Bunko. The company was merged with ASCII on April 1, 2008, and became ASCII Media Works.[1][2] They mainly catered to the Japanese male otaku crowd, covering such topics as anime, light novels, manga, plastic modelling, and visual novels. However, MediaWorks had published three magazines targeted towards females—Comic Sylph, Dengeki Girl's Style, and Character Parfait—but each one was a special edition version of another magazine. MediaWorks ran yearly contests for original novel and manga submissions, such as the light novel Dengeki Novel Prize contest.

In addition to publishing printed material, MediaWorks had been involved with the production of other media. They had developed and published visual novels for popular Japanese media franchises where many different forms of media are published for a given series. Such well-known series included Kashimashi: Girl Meets Girl, Shakugan no Shana, and Strawberry Marshmallow. MediaWorks had also been involved in the production of anime television and original video animation series.

MediaWorks, Inc.
株式会社メディアワークス
MediaWorks logo
FoundedOctober 15, 1992
SuccessorASCII Media Works
Country of originJapan
Headquarters locationChiyoda, Tokyo
Official websitewww.mediaworks.co.jp

History

In 1992, Kadokawa Shoten's president Haruki Kadokawa was devoting himself to the movie business, and his younger brother and vice-president of the company, Tsuguhiko Kadokawa, was in charge of magazines the company published. At the same time, Tsuguhiko was the president of Kadokawa's subsidiary Kadokawa Media Office which was in charge of publishing video game magazines like Comptiq, and manga magazines targeted towards the male otaku crowd in Japan centered around "media mix" Japanese series where many different forms of media are published for a given series. Citing differences in the interests of business direction, Tsuguhiko resigned from Kadokawa Shoten to start MediaWorks on October 15, 1992, with a large contingent from Kadokawa Shoten employees joining him.

In 1993, due to an influence from the Tokyo Shock Boys, known in Japan as the Dengeki Network (電撃ネットワーク), MediaWorks launched a series of magazines under the Dengeki line. These magazines were taken from previous publications that Kadokawa Media Office had published. The new magazines were named Dengeki Super Famicom (from Kadokawa's former magazine Marushō Super Famicom), Dengeki PC Engine (from Kadokawa's former magazine Marushō PC Engine), Dengeki Comic Gao! (from Kadokawa's former magazine Comic Comp), the now-defunct Dengeki Oh (taken from Comptiq), and the now-defunct Dengeki Megadrive (originally a special edition of Dengeki PC Engine). Also in 1993, Haruki Kadokawa was arrested for cocaine smuggling and lost his presidency at Kadokawa Shoten, which was soon taken over by Tsuguhiko Kadokawa in addition to his presidency of MediaWorks; MediaWorks was later made a subsidiary of Kadokawa Shoten in 2002. MediaWorks became a member of Kadokawa Group Holdings, and after Enterbrain became a member of the same group, Enterbrain's Famitsu line and MediaWorks' Dengeki line started to compete against each other, especially in terms of presenting information pertaining to bishōjo games. By 2001, MediaWorks specialized in publishing light novels, manga, video games, and magazines pertaining to such media. The company was merged with ASCII on April 1, 2008, and became ASCII Media Works.[1][2]

Magazines published

Publishing imprints

Dengeki Bunko
Dengeki Bunko (電撃文庫) is a light novel label aimed at a male audience established in June 1993. The editors in charge of this label have a reputation for welcoming new authors, and hold a yearly contest, the Dengeki Novel Prize, to discover new talent. The eighth volume of Kino's Journey, originally published in October 2006, was Dengeki Bunko's one-thousandth published novel. In April 2007, three movies based on separate light novel series published by Dengeki Bunko were produced; the three titles were Kino's Journey, Shakugan no Shana, and Inukami!.
Dengeki Comics
Dengeki Comics (電撃コミックス Dengeki Komikkusu) is a manga publishing label aimed at a male audience. Aside from the main Dengeki Comics label, there is the related Dengeki Comics EX label which publishes a lesser number of manga volumes. A large amount of the manga published under Dengeki Comics was originally serialized in the magazine Dengeki Daioh.
Dengeki G's Bunko
Dengeki G's Bunko (電撃G's文庫) was a publishing label originally established in 1997 as a light novel label aimed at a male audience—the light novels were based on bishōjo games. The label was run by three men: Mizuhito Akiyama, Hideyuki Kurata, and Masanori Date. As of 2003, the label has been suspended and has been succeeded by Dengeki Game Bunko.
Dengeki Game Bunko
Dengeki Game Bunko (電撃ゲーム文庫 Dengeki Gēmu Bunko) is a publishing label established in 1994 when it was originally related with tabletop role-playing games. The label stopped production in September 1997 but was later restarted in December 1999 as a computer game and light novel publisher. The label succeeded the previous publishing label Dengeki G's Bunko.
Sylph Comics
Sylph Comics is a manga publishing label aimed at a female audience. The manga that are published under this label were originally serialized in the shōjo magazine Comic Sylph. The first bound volumes were published under this label starting on March 21, 2008.

Contests

Dengeki Comic Grand Prix
The Dengeki Comic Grand Prix (電撃コミックグランプリ Dengeki Komikku Guran Puri) is an award handed out annually (since 2001) by the Japanese publisher MediaWorks for original one-shot manga. Between the first and fifth contests held, there were two divisions: original, and anthology. This was changed from the sixth contest on to a Daioh/Gao! division which covers seinen manga, and a Sylph division which covers shōjo manga. There are four types of prizes given out each contest: the Grand Prix Prize (one-million yen), the Semi-Grand Prix Prize (five-hundred-thousand yen), the Excellence Prize (two-hundred-thousand yen), and the Honorable Mention (one-hundred-thousand yen). There was also once a Dengeki Moeoh Grand Prize division which was held twice with a Grand Prize and Honorable Mentions.
Dengeki hp Tanpenshōsetsu Shō
The Dengeki hp Tanpenshōsetsu Shō (電撃hp短編小説賞) was an award handed out annually between 2000 and 2006 by the Japanese publisher MediaWorks for exceptionally written short stories and novellas. The prize was associated with MediaWorks' now-defunct light novel magazine Dengeki hp. Between the first and fourth contests held, the editorial department of MediaWorks' included the narrowed-down novellas in an issue of Dengeki hp, and the winner was decided from a reader-participation voting poll. This was changed with the fifth though seven contests by the use of a committee to award the prize.
Dengeki Taishō
The Dengeki Taishō (電撃大賞) is an award handed out annually (since 1994) by the Japanese publisher ASCII Media Works with two divisions: the Dengeki Novel Prize for light novels under Dengeki Bunko, and the Dengeki Illustration Taishō (電撃イラスト大賞) for illustrations. Each division consists of the Grand Prize (one million yen), the Gold Prize (five hundred thousand yen), and the Silver Prize (three hundred thousand yen).[3] The first two rounds also had a game design division called Dengeki Game Design Taishō (電撃ゲームデザイン大賞), and between the third and eleventh rounds there was a manga division called Dengeki Comic Taishō (電撃コミック大賞).

Video games

MediaWorks had been in the business of developing and producing video games of series that have light novels or manga published by MediaWorks. These games were typically visual novels, a genre of adventure games, but some have also been sound novels, which has less attributes of an adventure game than a normal visual novel. The video games produced were ported to the PlayStation 2 or Nintendo DS. Earlier games like Emerald Dragon and Ojōsama Express were ported to the PC Engine, Super Famicom, Sega Saturn, and PlayStation. Other games, like those based on the Shakugan no Shana series, were ported to both the PS2 and DS. A section of MediaWorks known as DS Dengeki Bunko produced sound novels playable on the Nintendo DS based from light novels published under MediaWorks' Dengeki Bunko publishing label. These included: Allison, Baccano!, Inukami!, and Iriya no Sora, UFO no Natsu.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b "Announcement of the merger between ASCII and MediaWorks" (PDF) (in Japanese). Kadokawa Shoten. Archived from the original on 2007-11-08. Retrieved 2007-12-08.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  2. ^ a b "Kadokawa Group to Merge ASCII, MediaWorks Subsidiaries". Anime News Network. 2007-10-02. Retrieved 2008-03-30.
  3. ^ "Dengeki Taishō official website" (in Japanese). ASCII Media Works. Archived from the original on 2008-06-02. Retrieved 2008-06-26.
  4. ^ "DS Dengeki Bunko's official website" (in Japanese). MediaWorks. Archived from the original on 2008-02-13. Retrieved 2007-12-21.

External links

Boogiepop and Others

Boogiepop and Others (ブギーポップは笑わない, Bugīpoppu wa Warawanai) is a Japanese light novel written by Kouhei Kadono and illustrated by Kouji Ogata. The first in the Boogiepop series, it was released in 1998 by MediaWorks and won the fourth Dengeki Game Novel Contest.

A manga adaptation by Kouji Ogata began serialization in 1999 and is licensed in English by Seven Seas Entertainment. The story takes place in an unnamed Japanese city, and follows five students at Shinyo Academy as they try to piece together the puzzle of a new drug and recent disappearances among the student populace. While the teachers believe them to only be runaways, the female students whisper among themselves about the urban legend Boogiepop, who is said to be a shinigami.

Dengeki Comic Grand Prix

The Dengeki Comic Grand Prix (電撃コミックグランプリ, Dengeki Komikku Guran Puri) is an award handed out semiannually (from 2004–2009) and annually (since 2010) by the Japanese publisher ASCII Media Works (formerly MediaWorks) for original one-shot manga. Between the first and fifth contests held, there were two divisions: original and anthology. This was changed with the sixth contest to a Daioh/Gao! division which covered shōnen manga, and a Sylph division which covered shōjo manga. Between the seventh and twelfth contests, the two divisions were changed to simply shōnen and shōjo manga. Starting with the 13th contest in 2011, a seinen manga division was added. There are three types of prizes given out each contest: the Grand Prix Prize (2 million yen), the Semi-Grand Prix Prize (500,000 yen), and the Excellence Prize (300,000 yen). The Grand Prix Prize has only been handed out four times in the contest's history: in 2004, 2005, 2010 and 2012. There was also once a Dengeki Moeoh Grand Prize division which was held twice with a Grand Prize and Honorable Mentions.

Dengeki Novel Prize

The Dengeki Novel Prize (電撃小説大賞, Dengeki Shōsetsu Taishō) is a literary award handed out annually (since 1994) by the Japanese publisher ASCII Media Works (formerly MediaWorks) for their Dengeki Bunko light novel imprint. The contest has discovered many popular and successful light novelists, like Kouhei Kadono and Yashichiro Takahashi. Originally called the Dengeki Game Novel Prize, the name was changed in 2003. The main Dengeki Novel Prize awards consist of the Grand Prize (¥3 million), Gold Prize (¥1 million) and Silver Prize (¥500,000). In addition to the money received, the winning novelists get their work published under Dengeki Bunko with the addition of an artist for the illustrated aspects of the light novels. However, if an entry is awarded the Media Works Bunko Prize, the winning novel will be published under ASCII Media Works' Media Works Bunko imprint, along with the author winning ¥1 million. Often, the name of the novel series is changed from what it was originally titled when it won the prize. There are over 5,000 submissions annually since 2011, and it is considered the largest prize for light novels.

Dengeki Taishō

Dengeki Taishō (電撃大賞) is a Japanese radio program broadcast by Nippon Cultural Broadcasting, Radio Osaka, and Tokai Radio Broadcasting which first aired in October 1994, and is produced by ASCII Media Works (formerly MediaWorks). The program airs late at night on the weekend ranging between either 1:00-1:30 AM, 1:30-2:00 AM, or 2:00-2:30 AM depending on the broadcasting channel. The program contains any news updates related to ASCII Media Works and light novels published under their light novel imprint Dengeki Bunko. Additionally, radio dramas air on the program based from light novels under Dengeki Bunko. Listeners can send in post cards to the program which may end up being read on the air, and any questions asked by listeners via the postcards are answered.

Dengeki hp Tanpenshōsetsu Shō

The Dengeki hp Tanpenshōsetsu Shō (電撃hp短編小説賞) was an award handed out annually between 2000 and 2006 by the Japanese publisher MediaWorks for exceptionally written short stories and novellas. The prize was associated with MediaWorks' now-defunct light novel magazine Dengeki hp. Between the first and fourth contests held, the editorial department of MediaWorks' included the narrowed-down novellas in an issue of Dengeki hp, and the winner was decided from a reader-participation voting poll. This was changed with the fifth though seven contests by the use of a committee to award the prize.

Futakoi

Futakoi (双恋, lit. "Twin Love") is a light novel, visual novel and anime television series created by Hina Futaba and Mutsumi Sasaki. The anime aired in Japan in 2004. It replaced Sister Princess as Dengeki G's Magazine premiere flagship title.

Kamichu!

Kamichu! (かみちゅ!) is a Japanese anime television series, strongly influenced by the Shinto religion, that follows the adventures of teenage goddess Yurie Hitotsubashi and her friends. The title is short for Kamisama de Chūgakusei (かみさまでちゅうがくせい, lit., "A Deity As a Middle School Student"). The series was created by Besame Mucho (ベサメムーチョ, Besamemūcho), which is the joint pen name of producer Tomonori Ochikoshi, director Koji Masunari, and writer Hideyuki Kurata. It was broadcast by the anime television network Animax on its respective networks worldwide, including Japan, East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, where it received its first English-language broadcast.

The series was adapted as a manga serialized in Dengeki Daioh, a shōnen manga magazine, and collected in two tankōbon volumes.

At the 2005 Japan Media Arts Festival, Kamichu! received an Excellence Prize for animation.On July 3, 2008, Geneon Entertainment and Funimation Entertainment announced an agreement to distribute select titles in North America. While Geneon Entertainment will still retain the license, Funimation Entertainment will assume exclusive rights to the manufacturing, marketing, sales and distribution of select titles. Kamichu! was one of several titles involved in the deal. However, as of August 2011, the rights to the series had expired.

Light Novel Award

The Light Novel Award (ライトノベルアワード, Raito Noberu Awaado) was a literary award handed out by the Japanese publisher Kadokawa Shoten for light novels, and was only held once in 2007. The novels which were applicable to receive the award were either published by Kadokawa Shoten under their Kadokawa Sneaker Bunko light novel label, or by three other publishing companies affiliated with Kadokawa Shoten in the Kadokawa Group—Enterbrain, Fujimi Shobo, and MediaWorks. The novels by Enterbrain were published under their Famitsu Bunko label; the novels by Fujimi Shobo were published under their Fujimi Fantasia Bunko or Fujimi Mystery Bunko labels; and the novels by MediaWorks were published under their Dengeki Bunko label (which encompasses their sub label Dengeki Game Bunko as well). There were five categories in the contest—romantic comedy, school setting, action, mystery, and novelization (for novels based on previously published material)—with four novels being picked for each category (one from each publisher) during the semi-final round. The final round picked one novel from each of the four listed in each category which became the winner in that given category. The winners were decided by readers of the novels themselves.

Makai Senki Disgaea

Makai Senki Disgaea (魔界戦記ディスガイア, Makai Senki Disugaia, lit., Netherworld Battle Chronicle Disgaea) is an anime series based on the video game Disgaea: Hour of Darkness. Makai Senki Disgaea follows the same general plot as the game, but with several alterations to character roles and the chronology of events. The anime was licensed by Geneon Entertainment before closing their doors in 2007. On September 1, 2010, North American anime distributor Funimation announced that they have rescued the series and release the complete series in 2011.

A bonus feature on the DVD of Disgaea 2: Cursed Memories was a trailer of what the Disgaea anime would look like. The trailer showed mainly scenes from episode 1 of the game where Laharl is awakened by Etna and he challenges Mid Boss in his castle. Also shown were Flonne's descent into the Netherworld, Gordon piloting his ship through space, and a peculiar battle between Laharl and Baal (who is visibly absent in the current anime). However, the anime turned out to be completely different from what was shown in the trailer. No explanation was given for the drastic departure of the final anime from the trailer. A preview of the Disgaea anime was also available on another Geneon anime DVD, Hellsing Ultimate OVA I.

Makai Senki Disgaea is also the title of several distinct manga and light novel series based on the Disgaea game series.

MediaWorks

MediaWorks may refer to:

MediaWorks New Zealand, runs five television channels and many radio stations across New Zealand

ASCII Media Works, a Japanese publishing house founded April 1, 2008

MediaWorks (publisher), a former Japanese publishing, which merged to form ASCII MediaWorks in April 1, 2008

SPH MediaWorks, a broadcasting company based in Singapore that was merged into MediaCorp

Sola (manga)

Sola is a Japanese work originally conceived by Naoki Hisaya (main writer of Kanon) with original character design by Naru Nanao (designer of D.C.: Da Capo). Sola is a mixed media project, first unveiled through the prologue of the manga featured in the Japanese manga magazine Dengeki Daioh on December 21, 2006, published by MediaWorks. The manga, which is illustrated by Chako Abeno, ended serialization on February 21, 2008. The manga has been licensed for distribution in North America by Broccoli Books with the first volume being released in June 2008. A short drama CD which also served as a prologue to the series was released at Comiket 71 in December 2006, and a second drama CD was released in May 2008. An anime version aired in Japan between April and June 2007; the anime contained thirteen episodes, and two additional DVD-exclusive episodes followed. The anime was licensed by Bandai Entertainment for distribution in North America in a subtitle-only box set of all fifteen episodes. The title, Sola, is close in pronunciation to the Japanese word sora (空, lit. "sky"). At the end of 2007, Japanese anime fans voted Sola as the best anime of the year.

Train Train

Train Train may refer to:

Train+Train, a 2000 Japanese light novel series

Train*Train, a manga by Eiki Eiki

"Train, Train" (The Count Bishops song), 1976

"Train, Train", a song by Blackfoot from the 1979 album Strikes

Train-Train (album), an album by The Blue Hearts

"Train-Train", a song by The Blue Hearts

Weekly Dearest My Brother

Weekly Dearest My Brother (週刊わたしのおにいちゃん, Shūkan Watashi no Onii-chan) is a series of six bishōjo-centered manga booklets that were released weekly for a short time in Japan. The manga would come packaged with a limited edition plastic-figure assembly kit, designed by Ohshima Yuki, of the featured character of the week. These figures of small-breasted prepubescent girls helped to expand the niche market of lolicon and also placed Ohshima in high esteem among figure collectors in Japan due to the high level of detail and clever portrayals. Some of Ohshima's figurines are reproduced by Takashi Murakami (Murakami, 2005).

Ys (anime)

Ys (イース, Īsu) are two different anime series, released as original video animation series, both of which are based on the video game series Ys. The first series spans seven episodes and covers the general plotline of the first game of the series, Ys I: Ancient Ys Vanished. The plot centers on Adol Christin as he journeys to the island of Esteria in search of adventure. Upon arrival, he learns that a dark priest known as Dark Fact has been tearing the island apart in search of six mystical tomes of power, the Books of Ys.

The second series picks up immediately after the end of the first and follows the second game, Ys II: Ancient Ys Vanished – The Final Chapter. With Dark Fact's apparent defeat, Adol sets out to solve the mystery of the mysterious books of Ys by going to the source: the floating island of Ys itself. Along with Feena and Reah, Adol makes the journey to the floating island and picks up another companion, Lilia. Also present is Dalles, attempting to resurrect the demon god Darm once again.

Ys I and II (video game) are often called BOOK ONE and BOOK TWO respectively. Not to be confused with the naming conventions of the games they were based on, the first animated series was split into two parts: BOOK ONE covers episodes 1-4 while BOOK TWO covers episodes 5-7. Since BOOK TWO refers to the second half of the Ys I series, the Ys II anime was named Castle in the Heavens.

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