Max Lanier

Hubert Max Lanier (August 18, 1915 – January 30, 2007) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who spent most of his career with the St. Louis Cardinals. He led the National League in earned run average in 1943, and was the winning pitcher of the clinching game in the 1944 World Series against the crosstown St. Louis Browns. His son Hal became a major league infielder and manager.

Max Lanier Cardinals
Lanier in 1941

Born in Denton, North Carolina, Lanier was one of a handful of players who remained active during the World War II years. A naturally right-handed player, he had become a left-handed pitcher only because he twice broke his right arm in childhood. After signing with the Cardinals in 1937, he reached the major leagues in 1938. He had arguably his best season in 1943, compiling a 15–7 record with a league-best 1.90 ERA. In 1944 he won a career-high 17 games, and was the winner of the final game of the World Series against the crosstown Browns. He was named an NL All-Star in both 1943 and 1944.

Lanier, along with a dozen other major leaguers, defected to the Mexican League in 1946 after being offered a salary nearly double what he was making with the Cardinals. Disappointed by poor playing conditions and allegedly broken contract promises, he tried to return to the Cardinals in 1948, but was barred by an order from commissioner Happy Chandler, imposing a five-year suspension on all players who had jumped to the Mexican League. In response, Lanier and teammate Fred Martin, as well as Danny Gardella of the New York Giants, sued Major League Baseball in federal court, challenging baseball's reserve clause as a violation of U.S. antitrust law (preceding the similar suit by Curt Flood some 25 years later). Chandler reinstated Lanier and the other players in June 1949.[1] Lanier immediately held out for more money than he was being paid at the time of his leaving for Mexico,[2] but eventually signed a contract paying him the same amount as in 1946.[3]

Lanier rejoined the Cardinals in 1949. After winning a total of 101 games for the club, he ended his career with the New York Giants (1952–53) and the Browns (1953).

Over fourteen seasons, Lanier posted a 108–82 record with 821 strikeouts and a 3.01 ERA in 1619​13 innings pitched, including 21 shutouts and 91 complete games.

Lanier died at age 91 in Dunnellon, Florida.[4]

Max Lanier
Max Lanier
Pitcher
Born: August 18, 1915
Denton, North Carolina
Died: January 30, 2007 (aged 91)
Dunnellon, Florida
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 20, 1938, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
July 4, 1953, for the St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Win–loss record108–82
Earned run average3.01
Strikeouts821
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ "Chandler Reinstates Outlawed Ball Players: Big League Players Who Jumped to Mexican Loop Forgiven; Few Expected to Make Grade". Beaver (Pennsylvania) Valley Times. United Press. June 6, 1949. p. 10. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  2. ^ Johnson, Vince (June 10, 1949). "Once Over Lightly: Max Lanier Holds Out for More". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. p. 19. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  3. ^ Max Lanier signs Card contract for $11,500
  4. ^ Goldstein, Richard (February 9, 2007). "Max Lanier, 91, Who Challenged Baseball's Reserve Clause, Is Dead". nytimes.com. Retrieved March 22, 2019.

External links

1939 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1939 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 58th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 48th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 92–61 during the season and finished 2nd in the National League.

1941 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1941 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 60th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 50th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 97–56 during the season and finished 2nd in the National League.

1942 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1942 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 61st season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 51st season in the National League. The Cardinals went 106–48 during the season and finished first in the National League. In the World Series, they met the New York Yankees. They won the series in 5 games.

Pitcher Mort Cooper won the MVP Award this year, with a 1.78 ERA, 22 wins, and 152 strikeouts.

1942 World Series

The 1942 World Series featured the defending champion New York Yankees against the St. Louis Cardinals, with the Cardinals winning the Series in five games for their first championship since 1934 and their fourth overall.

The 1942 Cardinals set a franchise record for victories with 106. Every Cardinal—except for Harry Gumbert—was a product of the team's farm system, which had been put in place by Branch Rickey.

The Yankees won Game 1 despite a Cardinals rally, but the Cardinals swept the rest. The loss was the Yankees' first since the 1926 World Series, also to the Cardinals. They had won eight Series in the interim (a record for most consecutive series won between losses) and had won 32 out of 36 World Series games in that period, including five sweeps (1927 vs. the Pirates, 1928 vs. the Cardinals, 1932 and 1938 vs. the Cubs and 1939 vs. the Reds).

1943 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1943 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 62nd season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 52nd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 105–49 during the season and finished 1st in the National League. In the World Series, they met the New York Yankees. They lost the series in 5 games.

1943 World Series

The 1943 World Series matched the defending champion St. Louis Cardinals against the New York Yankees, in a rematch of the 1942 Series. The Yankees won the Series in five games for their tenth championship in 21 seasons. It was Yankees manager Joe McCarthy's final Series win. This series was also the first to have an accompanying World Series highlight film (initially, the films were created as gifts to troops fighting in World War II, to give them a brief recap of baseball action back home), a tradition that still persists.

This World Series was scheduled for a 3–4 format because of wartime travel restrictions. The 3–4 format meant there was only one trip between ballparks, but if the Series had ended in a four-game sweep, there would have been three games played in one park and only one in the other.

Because of World War II, both teams' rosters were depleted. Johnny Beazley, Jimmy Brown, Creepy Crespi, Terry Moore and Enos Slaughter were no longer on the Cardinals' roster. Joe DiMaggio, Phil Rizzuto, Red Ruffing and Buddy Hassett were missing from the Yankees, and Red Rolfe had retired to coach at Dartmouth College.

Cardinals pitchers Howie Pollet, Max Lanier and Mort Cooper ranked 1–2–3 in the National League in ERA in 1943 at 1.75, 1.90 and 2.30, respectively.

1944 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1944 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 63rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 53rd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 105–49 during the season and finished 1st in the National League. In the World Series, they met their town rivals, the St. Louis Browns. They won the series in 6 games.

1945 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1945 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 64th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 54th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 95–59 during the season and finished 2nd in the National League. The Cardinals set a Major League record which still stands, for the fewest double plays grounded into during a season, with only 75.

1946 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1946 St. Louis Cardinals season was a season in American baseball. It was the team's 65th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 55th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 96–58 during the championship season and finished tied with the Brooklyn Dodgers for first in the National League. St. Louis then won a best-of-three playoff for the pennant, 2 games to none. In the World Series, they won in 7 games over the Boston Red Sox. They won on Enos Slaughter's "mad dash" that gave them a 4–3 lead in the 8th inning of game 7.

1949 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1949 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 68th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 58th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 96–58 during the season and finished second in the National League.

1952 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1952 New York Giants season was the franchise's 70th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with a 92-62 record, 4½ games behind the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Anderson Rangers

The Anderson Rangers was the final name of a minor league baseball team, located in Anderson, South Carolina, in the early 1970s. The club was a member of the Class A Western Carolinas League and played its home games at Anderson Memorial Stadium.

The team began in 1970 as the Anderson Senators and were affiliated with the Washington Senators through the 1971 season. In 1972, the team became the Anderson Giants after becoming an affiliate of the San Francisco Giants. However the following season, the club became an affiliate with the Detroit Tigers and changed their name once again to the Anderson Tigers.

During their final two season in existence, the club became an affiliate of the New York Mets, as the Anderson Mets and finally the Texas Rangers, as the Anderson Rangers.

Blix Donnelly

Sylvester Urban "Blix" Donnelly (January 21, 1914 – June 20, 1976) was an American professional baseball player. A right-handed pitcher and lifelong resident of Olivia, Minnesota, Donnelly had an 18-year (1935–52) professional career and worked in 190 Major League games between 1944 and 1951 for the St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Braves. He stood 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m) tall and weighed 166 pounds (75 kg).

Donnelly spent nine seasons in minor league baseball; in 1941, he had 28 wins and 304 strikeouts for the Class C Springfield Cardinals of the Western Association. He was promoted to the Major Leagues and the St. Louis Cardinals as a 30-year-old rookie in 1944. In 27 games, four as a starting pitcher, Donnelly posted a career-best 2.12 earned run average, won two of three decisions, and collected four saves as the Redbirds won their third successive National League championship.

Donnelly then turned in two outstanding performances in relief in the "All-St. Louis" 1944 World Series. In his first outing, in Game 1, he retired all six St. Louis Browns to face him, but the Browns held on for a 2–1 triumph. Then, in Game 2, Donnelly relieved starting pitcher Max Lanier in the eighth inning of a 2–2 tie. He worked four scoreless frames, allowing two hits and one base on balls while striking out seven, and was the winning pitcher when pinch hitter Ken O'Dea drove home the winning run in the bottom of the eleventh inning. The Cardinals went on to win the World Series over the Browns in six games.

Donnelly was sent to the Phillies in 1946 and spent 4​1⁄2 seasons with them, appearing in 113 games as both a starter and reliever. He was a member of the 1950 "Whiz Kids" edition that won the NL pennant, but at age 36 he was one of the older players on the squad and did not appear in the 1950 World Series.

All told, Donnelly allowed 659 hits in 691​2⁄3 MLB innings pitched, with 306 bases on balls and 296 strikeouts. He recorded 27 complete games as a starter and 12 saves as a reliever.

Cuban League

The Cuban League was one of the earliest and longest lasting professional baseball leagues outside the United States, operating in Cuba from 1878 to 1961. The schedule usually operated during the winter months, so the league was sometimes known as the "Cuban Winter League." It was always a small league, generally 3 to 5 teams, and was centered in Havana, though it sometimes included teams from outlying cities such as Matanzas or Santa Clara. The league became racially integrated in 1900, and during the first half of the 20th century the Cuban League was a premier venue for black and white players to meet. Many great black Northern American players competed in Cuba alongside native black and white Cuban stars such as José Méndez, Cristóbal Torriente, Adolfo Luque, and Martín Dihigo. After 1947, the Cuban League entered into an agreement with Major League Baseball and was used for player development. Following the 1959 Cuban Revolution, however, tensions rose with the new Communist government, and in March 1961 the government decreed the abolition of professional baseball.

Danny Gardella

Daniel Lewis Gardella (February 26, 1920 – March 6, 2005) was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball who played with the New York Giants (1944–45) and St. Louis Cardinals (1950). Born in New York City, he batted and threw left-handed. He is known as one of the handful of American Major League players who "jumped" their organized baseball teams to play in the "outlaw" Mexican League in 1946. (Others included Sal Maglie, Alex Carrasquel, Max Lanier and Mickey Owen.)

Drummondville (baseball)

The Drummondville professional baseball team was a member of the now extinct Quebec Provincial League and operated in Drummondville, in the Centre-du-Québec region of Quebec.

The team went through many incarnations over the years. They debuted as the Drummondville Tigers in 1940, but disbanded on July 6 of that year after posting a poor record.Professional baseball would come back to Quebec after World War II, when the Provincial League began operations. The league was rated as Class C, and the Drummondville Cubs would play as an unaffiliated team from 1948 to 1951. Then in 1952, the Cubs signed an agreement with the Washington Senators, and officially became the Senators Class C franchise.They would change their name to the Drummondville Royals in 1953 and again operate as a co-operative franchise. In 1954 the Philadelphia Athletics would come to town and make Drummondville their Class C home. The team then was renamed as the Drummondville A's, during what turned out to be their final season in the league.

Dunnellon, Florida

Dunnellon is a city in Marion County, Florida, United States. The population was 1,733 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Ocala Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Hal Lanier

Harold Clifton Lanier (born July 4, 1942) is a former infielder, coach and manager in Major League Baseball. From November 2014 through the end of his 2018 contract, Lanier, served as the first manager of the Ottawa Champions of the independent Can-Am League. From 1964 through 1973, Lanier played for the San Francisco Giants (1964–71) and New York Yankees (1972–73). He is the son of Max Lanier, a former MLB All-Star pitcher.

Roland Gladu

Roland Edouard Gladu (May 10, 1911 – July 26, 1994) was a Canadian professional baseball third baseman. He played in 21 games for the Boston Braves of Major League Baseball (MLB) during the 1944 baseball season. Gladu's career began in 1932 at Binghamton, New York, and extended over more than 20 years as a player and manager in five different countries—Canada, the U.S., Mexico, Cuba and England, where he played at London's West Ham stadium.

He was one of 13 players suspended by Baseball Commissioner A.B. Chandler in 1946 for jumping to the Mexican League, which offered higher salaries than the U. S. major leagues. Catcher Mickey Owen and pitchers Sal Maglie and Max Lanier were the best known of the other suspended players.

Gladu also played professional hockey in the off-season as a defenceman in the Quebec Hockey League. After his playing career, Gladu worked as a scout for the Milwaukee Braves. Pitcher Claude Raymond was one of the first players signed by Gladu.

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