Max Frankel

Max Frankel (born April 3, 1930) is an American journalist.

Max Frankel
BornApril 3, 1930 (age 88)
NationalityAmerican
EducationB.A. and M.A. Columbia College
OccupationJournalist
Spouse(s)Tobia Brown (until her death)
Joyce Purnick
ChildrenDavid Frankel
Margot Frankel Goldberg
Jonathan Frankel

Life and career

Frankel was born in Gera, Germany. He was an only child, and his family belonged to a tiny Jewish minority in the area. Hitler came to power when Frankel was three years old, and Frankel remembered Germany's racial tensions: "[I] could have become a good little Nazi in his army. I loved the parades; I wept when other kids marched beneath our window without me. But I was ineligible for the Aryan race, the Master Race that Hitler wanted to purify of Jewish blood…"[1]

He came to the United States in 1940. He attended the High School of Music & Art in Manhattan, class of 1948. He attended Columbia College, and began part-time work for The New York Times in his sophomore year. He received his BA degree in 1952 and an MA in American government from Columbia in 1953.

He joined The Times as a full-time reporter in 1952. After serving in the Army from 1953 to 1955, he returned to the local staff until he was sent overseas in November, 1956, to help cover stories arising from the Hungarian revolution. From 1957 to 1960 he was one of two Times correspondents in Moscow. After a brief tour in the Caribbean, reporting mostly from Cuba, he moved to Washington in 1961, where he became diplomatic correspondent in 1963 and White House correspondent in 1966.

Frankel was chief Washington correspondent and head of the Washington bureau from 1968 to 1972, then Sunday editor of The Times until 1976, editor of the editorial page from 1977 to 1986 and executive editor from 1986 to 1994. He wrote a Times Magazine column on the media from 1995 until 2000.

He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973 for coverage of Richard Nixon's trip to the People's Republic of China. He is also remembered as being the journalist who asked President Gerald Ford about Soviet domination in Eastern Europe during the second presidential debate of 1976. Some credit Ford's response to the question (replying that there was "no Soviet domination" of eastern Europe) as costing him the election.

On November 14, 2001, in the 150th anniversary issue, The New York Times ran an article by the then retired Frankel reporting that before and during World War II, the Times had as a matter of policy largely, though not entirely, ignored reports of the annihilation of European Jews.[2] Frankel called it "the century's bitterest journalistic failure."

Frankel is the author of the book High Noon in the Cold War – Kennedy, Khrushchev and the Cuban Missiles Crisis (Ballantine, 2004 and Presidio 2005) and, also, his memoir, The Times of My Life and My Life with the Times (Random House, 1999, and Delta, 2000).

Personal life

Frankel has been married twice. His first wife was Tobia Brown with whom he had three children: David Frankel, Margot Frankel Goldberg, and Jonathan Frankel.[3][4][5] She died of a brain tumor at the age of 52 in 1987.[3] He was married again in 1988 to Joyce Purnick, a Times columnist and editor.[6] They live in New York City.

See also

References

  1. ^ Nelson, Jack. "Max Frankel's Life and Times". Nieman Reports. President and Fellows of Harvard College. Retrieved 23 May 2017.
  2. ^ Frankel, Max (November 14, 2001). "Turning Away from the Holocaust". The New York Times.
  3. ^ a b "Tobia Brown Frankel, Teacher and Editor, 52". New York Times. March 17, 1987.
  4. ^ "Margot Frankel And Joel Goldberg". New York Times. July 13, 1997.
  5. ^ "Weddings/Celebrations; Erin Richards, Jonathan Frankel". New York Times. September 21, 2003.
  6. ^ "Max Frankel, Editor, Wed To Joyce Purnick, Journalist". New York Times. December 12, 1988.

External links

Official sites

Interviews

1973 Pulitzer Prize

The following are the Pulitzer Prizes for 1973.

Anthony Lewis

Anthony Lewis (March 27, 1927 – March 25, 2013) was an American public intellectual and journalist. He was twice winner of the Pulitzer Prize, and was a columnist for The New York Times. He is credited with creating the field of legal journalism in the United States.

Early in Lewis' career as a legal journalist, Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter told an editor of The New York Times: "I can't believe what this young man achieved. There are not two justices of this court who have such a grasp of these cases." At his death, Nicholas B. Lemann, the dean of Columbia University School of Journalism, said: "At a liberal moment in American history, he was one of the defining liberal voices."

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Butonia

Butonia is a multi-national European group of companies trading in garment trimmings and supplying accessories to the textile industry. The group originated in mid-19th century Germany and spread throughout Western Europe and Asia in the 20th century. Butonia offers a range of buttons, zippers, fastenings, click-locks, buckles, cord ends etc. for the garment, backpack, textile and related industries. Butonia also specialises in providing support to textile companies worldwide, from initial design to final manufacture.

Butonia was founded in 1865 by Zadok Alexander Frankel in Frankfurt, Germany under the name Z.A. Frankel & Co.. Zadok Alexander Frankels's widow, Regina Frankel, continued to run the company for over 40 years, after his early demise. The company was then jointly run by Max Frankel, Regina's son, and Salomon Stiebel, her son-in-law, until the 1930s-1940s. Subsequently thereto, the greatly expanded corporate group was managed from London by Ernest Frankel, Max's son, and Richard Stiebel, Salomon's son, until the late 1980s-1990s.

Butonia expanded in the early 20th century to Britain, Switzerland and the Netherlands and after the Second World War to Sweden, Belgium and Finland. In the 1930s the original German company was expropriated from its German-Jewish owners, the Frankel-Stiebel family, by the Nazi regime and renamed KHG - Knopf Handelsgesellschaft GmbH, a formal name that the German Butonia company still bears today.

In the 1930s, the Frankel-Stiebel family relocated to London, England and the British company, Butonia (London) Ltd., became the main group company. In the Netherlands, the Guggenheim family were partners in Butonia BV with the British shareholders prior to the Second World War, became joint shareholders of the entire group in 1994 and bought out the other shareholder groups in 2002. In 2003 Butonia opened a subsidiary in Lithuania in order to deal with increasing Eastern European manufacture.

In 1997 and 2000, respectively, Butonia opened subsidiaries in Bangalore, India and Hong Kong. These businesses were taken over by the Ruby Enterprises group in late 2002, headed by Ilan Shavit, the son of Richard Stiebel, and were rebranded in India and Guangzhou, China as Ryyty Apparel Resources in 2009.

Columbia Daily Spectator

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Frankel

Frankel is the surname of:

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Bethenny Frankel, American chef and reality television personality

Charles Frankel (1917–1975), American philosopher, known for Charles Frankel Prize

Cyril Frankel, retired British director

Dave Frankel, Attorney, former television weatherman and news anchor

David Frankel (born 1959), American director, editor, screenwriter, executive producer

Felice Frankel, a photographer of scientific art images, or artistic science images.

Gene Frankel (1919–2005), theater director

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Jonah Frankel (1928–2012), author, Hebrew literature professor and Israel Prize laureate

Jonah Frankel (businessman) (died 1846), German Jewish businessman, banker and philanthropist

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Leó Frankel (1844–1896), Hungarian politician

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Richard B. Frankel, American physicist

Robert "Bobby" J. Frankel (1941–2009), American thoroughbred race horse trainer

Sandra Frankel, former supervisor of the Town of Brighton, Monroe County, New York

Susannah Frankel, British fashion journalist and author

Stan Frankel (1919–1978), American physicist

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William Frankel (1903–2008), editor of the British weekly newspaper, The Jewish Chronicle, from 1958 to 1977

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Son of professor Max Fränkel and younger brother of de:Charlotte Fränkel, Fränkel studied classics at Berlin, Bonn and Göttingen. He later lectured at Göttingen, but was denied a professorship after the Machtergreifung. Eluding increasing racial discrimination by the Nazis, Fränkel immigrated to the United States in 1935. He was offered a professorship at Stanford shortly after. He also held guest professorships at University of California, Berkeley and Cornell University.

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Max Fränkel (Landsberg an der Warthe, 11 March 1846 – Berlin, 10 June 1903) was a German Jewish classical scholar, philologist, epigrapher and librarian. His primary area of study was classical Greek. He did not interest himself in the physical stones of the inscriptions or archaeology but in the texts themselves. His collection of Greek inscriptions from Pergamon is still a standard reference source. He was the father of the archaeologist de: Charlotte Fränkel (1880-1933), and of the classicist Hermann Fränkel, who in 1935 emigrated to America.

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Ryyty

Ryyty is an Asian group of companies trading in garment trimmings and supplying accessories to the textile industry with a direct family history of 146 years. Ryyty Apparel Resources India is a rebrand of Butonia (India) Ltd. The Butonia group originated in mid-19th century Germany and spread throughout Western Europe and Asia in the 20th century. Ryyty offers a range of buttons, zippers, fastenings, click-locks, buckles, cord ends etc. for the garment, backpack, textile and related industries. Ryyty also specialises in providing support to textile companies worldwide, from initial design to final manufacture.

The original company was founded in 1865 by Zadok Alexander Frankel in Frankfurt, Germany under the name Z.A. Frankel GmbH. Zadok Alexander Frankel's widow, Regina Frankel, continued to run the company for over 40 years, after his early demise. The company was then jointly run by Max Frankel, Regina's son, and Salomon Stiebel, her son-in-law, until the 1930s-1940s. Subsequently thereto, the greatly expanded corporate group was managed from London by Ernest Frankel, Max's son, and Richard Stiebel, Salomon's son, until the late 1980s-1990s.

The company expanded outside Germany under the name Butonia in the early 20th century to Britain, Switzerland and the Netherlands and after the Second World War to Sweden, Belgium and Finland. In the 1930s the original German company was expropriated from its German-Jewish owners, the Frankel-Stiebel family, by the Nazi regime and renamed KHG - Knopf Handelsgesellschaft GmbH, a formal name that the German Butonia company still bears today.

In the 1930s, the Frankel-Stiebel family relocated to London, England and the British company, Butonia (London) Ltd., became the main group company. In the Netherlands, the Guggenheim family were partners in Butonia BV with the British shareholders prior to the Second World War, became joint shareholders of the entire group in 1994 and bought out the European companies from the Frankel-Stiebel families in 2002.

In 1997 and 2000, respectively, Butonia opened subsidiaries in Bangalore, India and Hong Kong. These businesses were taken over by the Ruby Enterprises group in late 2002, headed by Ilan Shavit, the son of Richard Stiebel, the grandson of Salomon Stiebel and the great-grandson of Zadok Alexander Frankel. Ilan Shavit serves as the current Chairman of Ryyty. Butonia India was rebranded as ryyty in 2011. The source of the name is "fashion" in Sanskrit and "spice" in Finnish. One such spice is Saffron, an important colour in India and Hinduism, known in Hebrew and Arabic as Zafran, evocative of the original name of the company, Z.A. Frankel, founded in Germany in 1865. Ryyty thus continued in Asia in the 21st century, a business commenced in Europe in the 19th century, by the same family, four generations earlier.

In 2012, Ryyty opened a sourcing branch in Guangzhou, China.

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Principal photography began in New York City in May 2017. The film premiered at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2017, and went into limited release in the United States on December 22, 2017. It entered wide release on January 12, 2018, and grossed $179 million worldwide.

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Weißenfels (IPA: [ˈvaɪsənˌfɛls]; often written in English as Weissenfels) is the largest town of the Burgenlandkreis district, in southern Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. It is situated on the river Saale, approximately 30 km (20 mi) south of Halle.

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