Maui County, Hawaii

Maui County, officially the County of Maui, is a county in the U.S. state of Hawaii. It consists of the islands of Maui, Lanai, Molokai (except for a portion of Molokai that comprises Kalawao County), Kahoolawe, and Molokini. The latter two are uninhabited. As of the 2010 census, the population was 154,834.[1] The county seat is Wailuku.[2]

Maui County is included in the Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, HI Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Maui County
Haleakala National Park
Flag of Maui County

Flag
Official seal of Maui County

Seal
Location within the U.S. state of Hawaii
Location within the U.S. state of Hawaii
Map of the United States highlighting Hawaii

Hawaii's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 20°53′00″N 156°39′00″W / 20.883333333333°N 156.65°W
Country United States
State Hawaii
Founded1905
SeatWailuku
Largest cityKahului
Area
 • Total2,398 sq mi (6,210 km2)
 • Land1,162 sq mi (3,010 km2)
 • Water1,237 sq mi (3,200 km2)  51.6%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2018)
167,207
 • Density133/sq mi (51/km2)
Time zoneUTC−10 (Hawaii–Aleutian)
 • Summer (DST)HADT
Congressional district2nd
Websitewww.mauicounty.gov

Government

Maui County has a quasi-mayor-council form of municipal government. Unlike traditional municipal governments, the county government is established by the state legislature by statute and is not chartered. Executive authority is vested in the mayor, elected by the voters on a nonpartisan basis to a four-year term (with a limit of two consecutive full terms). Legislative authority is vested in the nine-member county council. All seats in the county council have residency requirements, but all Maui County voters may vote in elections for all nine seats regardless of residence. Members of the county council are elected on a nonpartisan basis to two-year terms (with a limit of five consecutive full terms).

The mayor of Maui County is Mike Victorino, serving since January 3, 2019. Victorino was a member of the county council from 2007 to 2017.

The county's Department of Liquor Control regulates and enforces state and county laws regarding the manufacture, importation, sale and consumption of intoxicating liquors.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 2,398 square miles (6,210 km2), of which 1,162 square miles (3,010 km2) is land and 1,237 square miles (3,200 km2) (51.6%) is water.[3] The islands that comprise Maui County correspond to the remnants of the ancient landmass of Maui Nui. The highest point in the county is the peak of Haleakalā at 10,023 feet (3,055 m). Haleakala is a shield volcano located on the eastern side of the island of Maui.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
190026,743
191029,76211.3%
192037,38525.6%
193055,54148.6%
194055,5340.0%
195048,179−13.2%
196042,576−11.6%
197045,9848.0%
198070,84754.1%
1990100,37441.7%
2000128,09427.6%
2010154,83420.9%
Est. 2018167,207[4]8.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2018[1]

As of the 2000 Census,[9] there were 128,094 people, 43,507 households, and 29,889 families residing in the county. The population density was 110 people per square mile (43/km²). There were 56,377 housing units at an average density of 49 per square mile (19/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 28.90% White, 1.40% Black or African American, 0.37% Native American, 33.01% Asian, 10.72% Pacific Islander, 1.36% from other races, and 22.24% from two or more races. 7.8% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 43,507 households out of which 33.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.90% were married couples living together, 12.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.30% were non-families. 21.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.91 and the average family size was 3.41.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.50% under the age of 18, 7.70% from 18 to 24, 30.90% from 25 to 44, 24.40% from 45 to 64, and 11.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.20 males.

Economy

Top employers

According to the County's 2018 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[10] the top employers in the county are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 State of Hawaii 4,860
2 Maui County 2,423
3 Grand Wailea Resort & Spa 1,400
4 Ritz-Carlton-Kapalua 1,000
5 United States Federal Government 860
6 Maui Memorial Medical Center 800
Four Seasons Resort Maui
7 Fairmont Kea Lani 700
Four Seasons Resort Lanai
Westin Maui Resort & Spa on Kaanapali Beach
8 Kea Lani Maui Restaurant 600
9 Hale Makua 500
Kaanapali Beach Club
Montage Kapalua Bay
Walmart
Royal Lahaina Resort
10 Wailea Beach Resort Marriott 420

Transportation

Airports

Three airports provide air service to the island of Maui:

There are also airports on Maui's smaller adjacent islands:

Major highways

Communities

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Politics

Maui County vote
by party in presidential elections
[11]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2016 25.89% 13,446 64.45% 33,480 9.66% 5,019
2012 23.85% 11,602 74.10% 36,052 2.05% 999
2008 21.54% 11,154 76.71% 39,727 1.75% 908
2004 38.34% 18,187 60.73% 28,803 0.93% 440
2000 32.81% 12,876 59.83% 23,484 7.36% 2,888
1996 26.74% 9,323 59.08% 20,600 14.18% 4,944
1992 30.17% 11,151 51.31% 18,962 18.52% 6,845
1988 41.96% 12,944 56.83% 17,532 1.21% 374
1984 52.45% 14,720 46.20% 12,966 1.36% 381
1980 40.23% 10,359 49.22% 12,674 10.56% 2,718
1976 45.78% 10,318 52.89% 11,921 1.33% 299
1972 61.09% 11,618 38.91% 7,399
1968 37.76% 6,401 60.84% 10,313 1.40% 237
1964 21.91% 3,553 78.09% 12,666
1960 54.79% 8,848 45.21% 7,302

Maui County was the only county in the United States won by Dennis Kucinich during his unsuccessful campaign for the Democratic Party nomination to the presidency in 2004.[12]

Sister cities

Maui County currently has 21 sister cities, including:

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 13, 2011. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  4. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 9, 2019.
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  10. ^ County of Maui CAFR Archived 2019-02-27 at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 26, 2017.
  12. ^ "US Election Atlas". Dave Leip. Retrieved 2008-01-11.
  13. ^ "Sister Cities". The Local Government of Quezon City. Archived from the original on 1 October 2017. Retrieved 9 April 2019.

External links

Coordinates: 20°53′N 156°39′W / 20.883°N 156.650°W

Haiku, Hawaii

Haʻikū is an unincorporated community in Maui County on the island of Maui in the state of Hawaii. For United States Census purposes, it is part of the Haiku-Pauwela, Hawaii census-designated place, which also includes Pauwela.It was named for the ancient Hawaiian land section of Haʻikū, which means "talk abruptly" or "sharp break" in the Hawaiian language.

Kahoolawe

Kahoʻolawe (Hawaiian: [kəˈhoʔoˈlɐve]) anglicized as Kahoolawe () is the smallest of the eight main volcanic islands in the Hawaiian Islands. Kahoʻolawe is located about seven miles (11 km) southwest of Maui and also southeast of Lānaʻi, and it is 11 mi (18 km) long by 6.0 mi (9.7 km) wide, with a total land area of 44.97 sq mi (116.47 km2). The highest point on Kahoʻolawe is the crater of Lua Makika at the summit of Puʻu Moaulanui, which is about 1,477 feet (450 m) above sea level. Kahoʻolawe is relatively dry (average annual rainfall is less than 65 cm or 26 in) because the island's low elevation fails to generate much orographic precipitation from the northeastern trade winds, and Kahoʻolawe is located in the rain shadow of eastern Maui's 10,023-foot-high (3,055 m) volcano, Haleakalā. More than one quarter of Kahoʻolawe has been eroded down to saprolitic hardpan soil, largely on exposed surfaces near the summit.

Kahoʻolawe has always been sparsely populated, due to its lack of fresh water. During World War II, Kahoʻolawe was used as a training ground and bombing range by the Armed Forces of the United States. After decades of protests, the U.S. Navy ended live-fire training exercises on Kahoʻolawe in 1990, and the whole island was transferred to the jurisdiction of the state of Hawaii in 1994. The Hawaii State Legislature established the Kahoʻolawe Island Reserve to restore and to oversee the island and its surrounding waters. Today Kahoʻolawe can be used only for native Hawaiian cultural, spiritual, and subsistence purposes.

The U.S. Census Bureau defines Kahoʻolawe as Block Group 9, Census Tract 303.02 of Maui County, Hawaii. Kahoʻolawe has no permanent residents.

Keokea, Maui County, Hawaii

Kēōkea is an unincorporated community on the island of Maui in Maui County, Hawaii, United States. It is situated on Hawaii State Highway 37 (the Kula Highway) at North Latitude 20.71 degrees, West Longitude 156.36 degrees. Its elevation is 2,860 feet (870 meters) above sea level. Agriculture, forestry and ranching—supported by the area's fertile though often rocky volcanic loams —are important around this settlement, which has a temperate climate because of its elevation. Tourism also contributes to the local economy. The area around Keokea is characterized by a steep precipitation gradient: lowlands just 5 miles (8.0 km) to the northwest have mean annual precipitation of less than 16 inches (410 mm), while higher elevations ten miles (16 km) to the northeast see 140 inches (3,600 mm). Keokea has a mean annual precipitation of about 32 inches (810 mm). The population was 1,612 at the 2010 Census.

Kihei, Hawaii

Kīhei is a census-designated place (CDP) in Maui County, Hawaiʻi, United States. The population was 20,881 at the 2010 census.

Lahaina Civic Center

The Lahaina Civic Center is a sports, convention and entertainment complex located at Ka'a'ahi Street and Honoapi'ilani Highway in Lahaina, Hawaii, on the island of Maui. It is the site of the annual Maui Invitational Basketball Tournament, held every November during Thanksgiving week and hosted by Chaminade University. Other events include the World Youth Basketball Tournament in July, concerts, trade shows, community festivals and fairs.

Lanai Airport

Lanai Airport (IATA: LNY, ICAO: PHNY, FAA LID: LNY), also written as Lānaʻi Airport, is a state owned, public use airport located three nautical miles or about 3.4 miles (6 km) southwest of the central business district of Lanai City (Lānaʻi City), in Maui County, Hawaii. The airport began regular operations in 1930. It is the only airport serving the island of Lanai (Lānaʻi).

As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 52,075 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 42,594 enplanements in 2009, and 43,922 in 2010. It is included in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2017–2021, in which it is categorized as a non-hub primary commercial service facility.

Launiupoko, Hawaii

Launiupoko is an unincorporated community and census-designated place on the island of Maui in Maui County, Hawaii, United States. Its population was 588 as of the 2010 census. The community is located on the west side of the island.

Maalaea, Hawaii

Māʻalaea is a census-designated place (CDP) in Maui County, Hawaiʻi, United States. The population was 352 at the 2010 census. Māʻalaea is the site of a small boat harbor, as well as the Maui Ocean Center.

Mahinahina, Hawaii

Mahinahina is an unincorporated community and census-designated place on the island of Maui in Maui County, Hawaii, United States. Its population was 880 as of the 2010 census. The community is located on the west side of the island.

Makawao, Hawaii

Makawao is a census-designated place (CDP) in Maui County, Hawaiʻi, United States. The population was 7,184 at the 2010 census. Located on the rural northwest slope of Haleakala on East Maui, the community is known for being the hub of the "Upcountry", a part of the island dominated by mostly agriculture and ranch land. Makawao Forest Reserve is to the east-northeast.

Makawao Union Church

Makawao Union Church is a church near Makawao on the Hawaiian island of Maui. It was founded by New England missionary Jonathan Smith Green during the Kingdom of Hawaii. The third historic structure used by the congregation was designed by noted local architect C.W. Dickey and dedicated in 1917 as the Henry Perrine Baldwin Memorial Church. In 1985, Makawao Union Church was placed on the Hawaii and National Register of Historic Places.

Maria Lanakila Catholic Church

Maria Lanakila Catholic Church is a parish of the Roman Catholic Church of Hawaii in the United States. Located in Lahaina on the island of Maui, the church falls under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Honolulu and its bishop. The parish has a mission in Kapalua under the title of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary. Maria Lanakila means "Victorious Mary", the Hawaiian language equivalent to the English language epithet "Our Lady of Victory", which refers to the Blessed Virgin Mary.

The first Catholic priests arrived on Maui on April 21, 1846. The pastor was Fr. Aubert of the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary. A temporary church was built on the site, with a new structure dedicated September 8, 1858. In 1927–1928 a concrete church was built on the original foundation. The pastor as of 2009 was Gary P. Colton.

The church is a contributing property of the Lahaina Historic District, designated a National Historic Landmark District on December 29, 1962.

It is located on 712 Waineʻe Street, coordinates 20°52′31″N 156°40′36″W.

The church appeared in the ABC television series Hart to Hart ("Harts and Palms," Season 3, Episode 14).

Molokai Airport

Founded in 1927, Molokai Airport, (IATA: MKK, ICAO: PHMK, FAA LID: MKK) also known as Hoolehua Airport is a state-owned, public use airport located six nautical miles (7 mi, 11 km) northwest of Kaunakakai, on the island of Molokai in Maui County, Hawaii, United States. It is the principal airport of the island.

As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 89,468 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008, 65,984 enplanements in 2009, and 88,688 in 2010. It is included in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2017–2021, in which it is categorized as a non-hub primary commercial service facility.

Paia, Hawaii

Pāʻia (pah-ee-ah) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Maui County, Hawaiʻi, on the northern coast of the island of Maui. The population was 2,668 at the 2010 census. Pāʻia is home to several restaurants, art galleries, surf shops and other tourist-oriented businesses. It was formerly home to a Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar mill from 1880 to 2000.Pāʻia is the first town on the Hāna highway when heading eastbound towards Hāna.

Paia is located close to many internationally known windsurfing spots including Ho'okipa and Spreckelsville. It is therefore sometimes called "The World Capital of Windsurfing".

Waikapu, Hawaii

Waikapū is a census-designated place (CDP) in Maui County, Hawaiʻi, United States. The population was 2,965 at the 2010 census.

Wailua, Maui County, Hawaii

Wailua is an unincorporated community in Maui County on the island of Maui in the state of Hawaii.Wailua shares the ZIP code of 96713 with Keanae and Hana.

Waiola Church

Waiola Church is the site of a historic mission established in 1823 on the island of Maui in Hawaii. Originally called Waineʻe Church until 1953, the cemetery is the final resting place for early members of the royal family of the Kingdom of Hawaii.

Wananalua Congregational Church

The Wananalua Congregational Church is a historic 19th-century building on the remote coast of Maui in Hawaii.

ʻUalapuʻe, Hawaii

ʻUalapuʻe is an unincorporated community and census-designated place on the island of Molokai in Maui County, Hawaii, United States. Its population was 425 as of the 2010 census. The community is located along Hawaii Route 450 on the southeast coast of the island of Molokai. ʻUalapuʻe does not have villages, but many famous fishponds.

Places adjacent to Maui County, Hawaii
Islands, municipalities, and communities of Maui County, Hawaii, United States
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Unincorporated
communities
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