Matt Guokas

Matthew George Guokas Jr. (/ˈɡuːkəs/; born February 25, 1944) is an American former professional basketball player and coach. His father, Matt Sr. and uncle, Al, have also played in the NBA.

Guokas and his father, Matt Sr., were the first father-son duo to both win NBA championships as players; this feat has since been repeated by the Barrys (Rick and Brent), the Waltons (Bill and Luke) and the Thompsons (Mychal and Klay).

Matt Guokas
Personal information
BornFebruary 25, 1944 (age 75)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Listed weight175 lb (79 kg)
Career information
High schoolSaint Joseph's Prep
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
CollegeSaint Joseph's (1964–1966)
NBA draft1966 / Round: 1 / Pick: 9th overall
Selected by the Philadelphia 76ers
Playing career1966–1976
PositionShooting guard / Small forward
Number14, 24, 11, 4, 10
Career history
As player:
19661970Philadelphia 76ers
1970–1971Chicago Bulls
19711973Cincinnati Royals / Kansas City-Omaha Kings
1973–1974Houston Rockets
1974Buffalo Braves
19741975Chicago Bulls
1975–1976Kansas City Kings
As coach:
19821985Philadelphia 76ers (assistant)
19851988Philadelphia 76ers
19891993Orlando Magic
Career highlights and awards
As player:

As assistant coach:

Career statistics
Points4,285 (5.8 ppg)
Rebounds1,446 (2.0 rpg)
Assists2,174 (3.0 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Biography

Playing career

Guokas played college basketball for hometown Saint Joseph's University, where he set many school records in assists and steals. He was an All-American as a junior in 1966, and graduated in 1967.[1] After SJU, Guokas was selected in the first round by the Philadelphia 76ers team and played for the team featuring Wilt Chamberlain, Hal Greer, Chet Walker and Billy Cunningham that ended the eight-year championship streak of the Boston Celtics. He also played with the Buffalo Braves, Chicago Bulls, Cincinnati Royals, Houston Rockets, and Kansas City Kings, all of the NBA. In the 1972–73 season, Guokas finished second (to Chamberlain) in the NBA in field goal percentage with a .570 clip during that season.

Coaching and broadcasting

Guokas later returned to the Sixers as an assistant coach under Billy Cunningham, and was named head coach when Cunningham retired in 1985. He led the Sixers to two second-place finishes, but was fired after a slow start to the 1987–88 season.

After a year away from the game, he served as the first coach of the Orlando Magic, steering the team through its first four years, the last of which saw the Magic come within one game of making the playoffs in Shaquille O'Neal's rookie year. He compiled a combined 230–305 career record in parts of seven seasons.

He formerly worked as a TV color commentator and sports analyst for the Magic on Fox Sports Florida and Sun Sports cable channels, teaming with veteran NBA and college sportscaster David Steele. He also served as a color commentator for NBA on NBC broadcasts during the 1990s and was a color commentator for the Cleveland Cavaliers for Fox Sports Ohio cable channel for a number of years in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Head coaching record

Legend
Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %
Playoffs PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %

Personal life

Guokas's father (Matt Sr.), uncle (Al) and son (Matt III) have all played for Saint Joseph's University.[2][3]

References

  1. ^ "Bio: Matt Guokas, Jr". St. Joseph's University. Retrieved 29 May 2017.
  2. ^ McKinney, Jack; Gordon, Robert (2005). Jack McKinney's Tales from Saint Joseph's Hardwood: The Hawk Will Never Die. Sports Publishing LLC. p. 85. ISBN 9781582619293. Retrieved November 24, 2018.
  3. ^ "Saint Joseph's men's basketball 2018–19 media guide" (PDF). sjuhawks.com. p. 91. Retrieved November 24, 2018.

External links

1938 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1938 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation, Converse, the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and Madison Square Garden.

1946–47 Philadelphia Warriors season

The 1946–47 BAA season was the first season of the Philadelphia Warriors in the BAA (which later became the NBA). The Warriors finished the season winning their first Championship.

1966 NBA draft

The 1966 NBA draft was the 20th annual draft of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on May 11 and 12, 1966 before the 1966–67 season. In this draft, ten NBA teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players. A player who had finished his four-year college eligibility was eligible for selection. If a player left college early, he would not be eligible for selection until his college class graduated. The first two picks in the draft belonged to the teams that finished last in each division, with the order determined by a coin flip. The New York Knicks won the coin flip and were awarded the first overall pick, while the Detroit Pistons were awarded the second pick. This draft was the first to use the coin flip method, which replace the territorial pick rule. The remaining first-round picks and the subsequent rounds were assigned to teams in reverse order of their win–loss record in the previous season. An expansion franchise, the Chicago Bulls, took part in the NBA Draft for the first time and were assigned the last pick of each round. The draft consisted of 19 rounds comprising 112 players selected.

Beginning in 1966, the territorial selection allowed in previous drafts was eliminated (i.e. the "common draft" era).

1966 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1966 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1977 NBA draft

The 1977 NBA draft was the 31st annual draft of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on June 10, 1977, before the 1977–78 season. In this draft, 22 NBA teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players and other eligible players, including international players. The first two picks in the draft belonged to the teams that finished last in each conference, with the order determined by a coin flip. The Milwaukee Bucks won the coin flip and were awarded the first overall pick, while the Kansas City Kings, who obtained the New York Nets first-round pick in a trade, were awarded the second pick. The remaining first-round picks and the subsequent rounds were assigned to teams in reverse order of their win–loss record in the previous season. A player who had finished his four-year college eligibility was eligible for selection. If a player left college early, he would not be eligible for selection until his college class graduated. Before the draft, six college underclassmen were declared eligible for selection under the "hardship" rule. These players had applied and gave evidence of financial hardship to the league, which granted them the right to start earning their living by starting their professional careers earlier. Four former American Basketball Association (ABA) franchises who joined the NBA when both leagues merged, the Denver Nuggets, the Indiana Pacers, the New York Nets and the San Antonio Spurs, took part in the NBA Draft for the first time. Prior to the start of the season, the Nets relocated to New Jersey and became the New Jersey Nets. The draft consisted of 8 rounds comprising the selection of 170 players.

1992–93 Orlando Magic season

The 1992–93 NBA season was the Magic's fourth season in the National Basketball Association. This season held a lot of promise as Shaquille O'Neal was drafted first overall by the Magic in the 1992 NBA draft. Meanwhile, the Magic signed free agent Donald Royal during the offseason. There were predictions that O'Neal would become the next dominant center in the NBA. Shaq became an instant superstar with merchandising that rivaled only Michael Jordan. The Magic started to show improvement winning eight of their first eleven games, but then lost six straight afterwards. In December, the team acquired Steve Kerr from the Cleveland Cavaliers. However, the Magic had various problems with injuries as midway through the season, Dennis Scott ruptured his Achilles tendon. The Magic lost a tie-breaker for the final playoff spot in the Eastern Conference to the Indiana Pacers with a 41–41 record.

O'Neal averaged 23.4 points, 13.9 rebounds and 3.5 blocks per game as he was named Rookie of The Year. He was also selected for the 1993 NBA All-Star Game. Following the season, Kerr signed as a free agent with the Chicago Bulls, head coach Matt Guokas was fired and Terry Catledge retired.

2001 NBA playoffs

The 2001 NBA playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Association's 2000-01 season. The tournament concluded with the Western Conference champion Los Angeles Lakers defeating the Eastern Conference champion Philadelphia 76ers 4 games to 1. Shaquille O'Neal was named NBA Finals MVP for the second straight year. Since 2001, the 76ers have not advanced beyond the conference semifinals.

This was the 76ers' first Finals appearance since Moses Malone and Julius Erving led the 1983 team to the NBA title (coincidentally, last defeating the Lakers) in the famous "fo', fo', fo'" year (it ended up being "fo', fi', fo'", as Philadelphia lost one second-round game to the Milwaukee Bucks that year).

However, it was the Lakers' turn to put together the most dominant postseason in NBA history, going 15–1 with their only loss coming in OT to the Sixers in Game 1 of the Finals. They set many records, including going undefeated in regulation and on the road (finishing 8–0 in the latter category). They were the second NBA champion to defeat four 50-win or better teams on their way to the title as the Rockets did it first in 1995. The Lakers also equaled the previous records set by their 1989 team by winning their first 11 post-season games and sweeping three series in the post-season. Their playoff dominance would be bested after the first round of playoffs was extended to a best of seven format instead of the best of five in the 2003 NBA playoffs by the 2016-17 Golden State Warriors who would go 16-1 on their way to their fifth championship.

The Milwaukee Bucks won their first playoff series since 1989, made the Eastern Conference Finals for the first time since 1986 and won the division for the first time since that year. They won the division and a playoff series in 2019.

The Dallas Mavericks made the playoffs for the first time since 1990. Along the way they had many abysmal seasons, including back-to-back years with 11 and 13 wins. By beating Utah in the first round, they won their first playoff series since 1988. Reunion Arena, their home court for 21 years, hosted its last game (Game 4 of the Western Conference Semifinals against the Spurs); they moved to American Airlines Center, the next season.

The Sacramento Kings won their first playoff series since 1981 (when they were the Kansas City Kings) and the first since moving to Sacramento.

The Toronto Raptors won their first playoff series in franchise history 3–2 over the New York Knicks. For the first time since 1991, the Knicks failed to win a first-round playoff series.

Al Guokas

Albert G. "Al" Guokas (August 7, 1925 – August 2, 1990) was a professional basketball player who spent one season in the National Basketball Association as a member of the Denver Nuggets and the Philadelphia Warriors during the 1948–49 season. He attended Saint Joseph's University. His brother, Matt Guokas, Sr. and nephew were also professional basketball players.

Guokas

Guokas is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Matt Guokas, Sr. (1915–1993), American basketball player and broadcaster

Matt Guokas (born 1944), American basketball player, coach and broadcaster

List of NBA Finals broadcasters

The following is a list of the television and radio networks and announcers that have broadcast NBA Finals games over the years.

List of National Basketball Association players (G)

This is a list of National Basketball Association players whose last names begin with G.

The list also includes players from the American National Basketball League (NBL), the Basketball Association of America (BAA), and the original American Basketball Association (ABA). All of these leagues contributed to the formation of the present-day NBA.

Individuals who played in the NBL prior to its 1949 merger with the BAA are listed in italics, as they are not traditionally listed in the NBA's official player registers.

List of Orlando Magic broadcasters

Matches played by the American basketball team Orlando Magic have been broadcast since its founding in 1989. Radio commentaries have been broadcast on the WDBO channel, and matches have been televised on Fox Sports Florida and its predecessors. The teams of commentators include a play-by-play commentator, a color commentator, a courtside reporter, and a studio host.

List of Orlando Magic head coaches

The Orlando Magic are an American professional basketball team based in Orlando, Florida. They play in the Southeast Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The franchise was founded in 1989 as an expansion team, and has played at the Amway Center. The team is owned by Orlando Magic, Ltd., a subsidiary of RDV Sports, Inc. The team has won four division titles (1995, 1996, 2008, 2009), two conference titles (1995, 2009), but no league championships.There have been eight former head coaches for the Magic franchise. The team's first head coach was Matt Guokas, who coached the team for 328 games over four seasons. Brian Hill is the team's all-time leader in regular-season games coached (459). Hill is also the team's all-time leader in regular-season games won (267), and he is the team's only coach to have coached during two non-consecutive periods. Stan Van Gundy was the team's coach from the beginning of the 2007–08 season until the end of the 2011–12 season. He is the team's all-time leader in playoff games coached (59), playoff games won (31), regular-season winning percentage (.657), and playoff winning percentage (.523). Doc Rivers is the team's only coach to have won the NBA Coach of the Year award, winning it after the 1999–2000 season. Chris Jent is the team's only head coach to have spent his entire career with the Magic.On July 28, 2012, Jacque Vaughn was named the new head coach. He was the assistant coach for the San Antonio Spurs in the two seasons prior to his hiring.On May 29, 2015, the Magic hired their former point guard Scott Skiles as the franchise's 12th head coach.When Skiles resigned after one season, the Magic hired Frank Vogel as his successor. Vogel was fired following the end of the 2017–18 season.

List of Orlando Magic seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Orlando Magic. The Orlando Magic are an American professional basketball team based in Orlando, Florida. They play in the Southeast Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The team was established in 1989. The Magic have not won an NBA title, but have appeared in the NBA Finals twice, in 1995 and 2009. The best record posted by the Magic was 60–22, in the 1995–96 season, and their worst record was 18–64, in the team's inaugural season.

List of Philadelphia 76ers head coaches

The Philadelphia 76ers are an American professional basketball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Formerly known as the Syracuse Nationals, the 76ers joined the NBA when it was founded in 1949. The Nationals had a record of 51–13 in their first NBA season under coach Al Cervi and won the Eastern Division crown. The franchise were purchased by Philadelphian Irv Kosloff and Ike Richma in the spring of 1963; the NBA approved their franchise shift on May 22 and name change to the Philadelphia 76ers on August 6. This brought professional basketball back to the city, which had been without a team since the Golden State Warriors left Philadelphia in 1962. After coaching the 76ers since 2010, Doug Collins resigned as head coach on April 18, 2013 following the 2012–13 season. Brett Brown was hired to be the head coach of the 76ers on August 15, 2013 prior to the start of the 2013-14 season.There have been 24 head coaches for the Philadelphia 76ers franchise. The franchise won their first NBA championship as the Syracuse Nationals in the 1955 NBA Finals under coach Cervi. Their second title was won as the Philadelphia 76ers in 1967, coached by Alex Hannum, who has the highest career winning percentage for the 76ers. Billy Cunningham, who played and coached with the 76ers for 17 years, is the franchise's all-time leader in both regular season and playoff games coached and wins. He coached the team to their most recent title in 1983.Hannum, Jack Ramsay, and Larry Brown are the only members of the franchise to have been inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame as coaches. Cervi, Paul Seymour, and Kevin Loughery served as a player-coaches, and Cervi, after retiring as a player, continued to coach the team for the rest of the season that he retired during and five additional seasons. Six other former players, Hannum, Dolph Schayes, Cunningham, Matt Guokas, Fred Carter, and Maurice Cheeks went on to coach for the franchise.

Matt Guokas Sr.

Matthew George Guokas Sr. (November 11, 1915 – December 9, 1993) was an American professional basketball player and broadcaster. He was the son of Lithuanian immigrants.A 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) forward from Saint Joseph's University, Guokas played one season of professional basketball with the Philadelphia Warriors of the BAA (a precursor to the NBA). He averaged 1.7 points during the Warriors' 1946–47 championship season. After losing his right leg in an automobile accident, Guokas turned to broadcasting, and he served as an announcer for the National Football League's Philadelphia Eagles from 1953 to 1985.

His son Matt Guokas Jr. played in the NBA from 1966 to 1976, and later coached the Philadelphia 76ers and Orlando Magic and worked as a broadcaster for the NBA on NBC and other sports networks.

Guokas and his son, Matt Jr., were the first father-son duo to both win NBA championships as players; this feat has since been repeated by the Barrys (Rick and Brent), the Waltons (Bill and Luke) and the Thompsons (Mychal and Klay).

Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result
Philadelphia 1985–86 82 54 28 .659 2nd in Atlantic 12 6 6 .500 Lost in Conference Semifinals
Philadelphia 1986–87 82 45 37 .549 2nd in Atlantic 5 2 3 .400 Lost in First Round
Philadelphia 1987–88 43 20 23 .465 (fired)
Orlando 1989–90 82 18 64 .220 7th in Central Missed playoffs
Orlando 1990–91 82 31 51 .378 4th in Midwest Missed playoffs
Orlando 1991–92 82 21 61 .256 7th in Atlantic Missed playoffs
Orlando 1992–93 82 41 41 .500 4th in Atlantic Missed playoffs
Career 535 230 305 .430 17 8 9 .471

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