Mary Elizabeth Counselman

Mary Elizabeth Counselman (November 19, 1911 – November 13, 1995) was an American writer of short stories and poetry.

Mary Elizabeth Counselman
BornNovember 19, 1911
Birmingham, Alabama, United States
DiedMay 4, 1994 (aged 82)
Pen nameCharles Dubois, Sanders McCrorey, and John Starr
Occupationshort story writer, poet
NationalityUnited States
Genrehorror, fantasy

Biography

Mary Elizabeth Counselman was born on November 19, 1911 in Birmingham, Alabama. She began writing poetry as a child and sold her first poem at the age of six.[1] She later moved to Gainesville, Georgia, where her father was a faculty member at the Riverside Military Academy.[2] She attended the University of Alabama and Alabama College (now Montevallo University).[1][2]

Counselman's work appeared in Weird Tales, Collier's, The Saturday Evening Post, Good Housekeeping, Ladies' Home Journal, and other magazines.[1] Her stories were dramatized on General Electric Theater and other national television programs in the USA, Canada, the British Isles, and Australia.

Counselman began writing weird fiction for the pulp magazines in the 1930s. [3] Her tale "The Three Marked Pennies", written while she was in her teens, and published in Weird Tales in 1934, was one of the three most popular in all of Weird Tales history.[1][4][5] Readers mentioned it in letters for years after its publication.[4]

Another story, "Seventh Sister" published in Weird Tales in January 1943, is a rare example of a voodoo story written by a woman.[1]

In describing her philosophy of writing horror fiction, she said, "The Hallowe'en scariness of the bumbling but kindly Wizard of Oz has always appealed to me more than the gruesome, morbid fiction of H. P. Lovecraft, Clark Ashton Smith, and those later authors who were influenced by their doom philosophies. My eerie shades bubble with an irrepressible sense of humour, ready to laugh with (never at) those earth-bound mortals whose fears they once shared."[5]

Later, Counselman worked as a reporter for The Birmingham News. Counselman taught creative writing classes at Gadsden State Junior College (now the Wallace Drive Campus of Gadsden State Community College) and at the University of Alabama.

She completed a novel about witchcraft, and in 1976 received a $6000 National Endowment for the Arts grant.

The late August Derleth anthologised her poems in Dark of the Moon: Poems of Fantasy and the Macabre and Fire and Sleet and Candlelight.

For most of her life she resided on a houseboat in Gadsden, Alabama,[1] with her husband, Horace B. Vinyard, whom she married in 1941,[1][2] and a large entourage of cats.[2]

Books

  • Half in Shadow: A Collection of Tales for the Night Hours (short stories) (UK edition, Consul paperback/World Distributors, 1964; contains 14 tales, 6 not in the later US edition; Arkham House edition, 1978; contains 14 tales, 6 not in the earlier UK edition). Reprint: London: William Kimber, 1980.
  • African Yesterdays:A Collection of Native Folktales. Centre, Ala.: Coosa Printing Co., 1975 (enlarged ed 1977)
  • Move Over - It's Only Me (verse) (1975)
  • Everything You Always Wanted to Know About the Supernatural - but Are Afraid to Believe (1976)
  • SPQR: The Poetry and Life of Catullus (1977)
  • The Eye and the hand (verse) (1977)
  • New Lamps for Old (1978)
  • The Face of Fear and Other Poems (Pensacola, FL: Eidolon Press, 1984)(Compiled by Steve Eng; intro by Joseph Payne Brennan

Awards

Counselman received the 1981 Phoenix Award from the Southern Fandom Confederation.

Adaptations

The short story "Parasite Mansion", first published in the January 1942 issue of Weird Tales was adapted into an episode of the Thriller television anthology series, broadcast April 25, 1961. The episode is described as of above-average quality but undermined by its "blithe acceptance of the supernatural". It is, however, considered stronger than Counselman's original work.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Davin, Eric Leif (2006). Partners in Wonder: Women and the Birth of Science Fiction, 1926-1965. Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books. p. 375. ISBN 9780739112670.
  2. ^ a b c d "The Authors and Editors of Arkham House". Archived from the original on 2007-02-02. Retrieved 2007-01-18.
  3. ^ VanderMeer, Ann and Jeff. "The Weird: An Introduction". Weird Fiction Review. Retrieved 5 October 2018.
  4. ^ a b Reid, Robin Anne (2009). Women in Science Fiction and Fantasy. 1. ABC-CLIO. p. 47. ISBN 9780313335914.
  5. ^ a b c Warren, Alan (2004). This Is a Thriller. McFarland. pp. 94–97. ISBN 9780786419692.
  • "MARY ELIZABETH COUNSELMAN". Archived from the original on 2008-06-03. Retrieved 2007-01-18.
  • Ruber, Peter, ed. (2000). "Mary Elizabeth Counselman". Arkham's Masters of Horror: A 60th Anniversary Anthology Retrospective of the First 30 Years of Arkham House. Sauk City, Wisc.: Arkham House Publishers. pp. 301–306. ISBN 9780870541773.
  • Sullivan, Jack, ed. (1986). "Mary Elizabeth Counselman". The Penguin Encyclopedia of Horror and the Supernatural. New York: Viking Penguin. ISBN 9780670809028.

External links

Arkham's Masters of Horror

Arkham's Masters of Horror is an anthology of fantasy and horror stories edited by Peter Ruber. It was released by Arkham House in an edition of approximately 4,000 copies in 2000. The book includes an introductory essay by Ruber before each story and about its author.

Ruber drew criticism from the horror/fantasy community for the hostility with which he introduced some authors within the volume - for instance, his accusation that H.P. Lovecraft "had a schizoid personality" and could be labelled "a genuine crackpot."

The book was translated into Spanish in 2010 as Maestros del horror de Arkham House (Valdemar).[1]

Counselman

Counselman is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

John Counselman, American college football player and professor

Mary Elizabeth Counselman (1911–1995), American short story writer and poet

Dark Mind, Dark Heart

Dark Mind, Dark Heart is an anthology of horror stories edited by American writer August Derleth. It was released in 1962 by Arkham House in an edition of 2,493 copies. The anthology was conceived as a collection of new stories by old Arkham House authors. The anthology is also notable for including the first Cthulhu Mythos story by Ramsey Campbell.

Deathrealm

Deathrealm was a small-press magazine of horror fiction that ran from 1987 through 1997, edited by Stephen Mark Rainey. The magazine was headquartered in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Grotesquerie

Grotesquerie is a literary form that became a popular genre in the early 20th century. It can be grouped with science fiction and horror. Authors such as Ambrose Bierce, Fritz Leiber, H. Russell Wakefield, Seabury Quinn, Mary Elizabeth Counselman, Margaret St. Clair, Stanton A. Coblentz, Lee Brown Coye and Katherine Anne Porter have written books within this genre.

The term has also been used to describe macabre artwork and movies, and it is used in architecture.

Half in Shadow

Half in Shadow is a collection of stories by author Mary Elizabeth Counselman. It had first been published as a fourteen story collection (six stories not in the later Arkham House edition) as a Consul paperback by World Distributors, UK, in 1964. It was released in 1978 by Arkham House with fourteen stories (six not in the earlier UK edition) and was the author's first hardcover book. It was published in an edition of 4,288 copies. Most of the stories had appeared previously in the magazine Weird Tales. The jacket and frontispiece are by Tim Kirk. There has also been a reprint - London: William Kimber, 1980.

Henry Kuttner

Henry Kuttner (April 7, 1915 – February 3, 1958) was an American author of science fiction, fantasy and horror.

List of speculative poets

This is a list of speculative poets. People on this list should have articles of their own, and should meet the Wikipedia notability guidelines for their poetry. Please place names on the list only if there is a real and existing article on the poet.

Mary Elizabeth

Mary Elizabeth has been the given name of many famous women.

Over the Edge (anthology)

Over the Edge is an anthology of horror stories edited by American writer August Derleth. It was released in 1964 by Arkham House in an edition of 2,520 copies. The anthology was produced to mark the 25th anniversary of Arkham House. None of the stories had been previously published.

Phoenix Award (science fiction)

The Phoenix Award is a lifetime achievement award for a science fiction professional "who has done a great deal for Southern Fandom." The Phoenix is given annually by DeepSouthCon, a bidded convention held in different states of the former Confederacy.There is no standard shape or image for the Phoenix as each host convention creates their own unique interpretation of the award. The Phoenix is presented in conjunction with Rebel Award for a science fiction fan meeting similar criteria. The award recipients are chosen by the host convention.

Seabury Quinn

Seabury Grandin Quinn (also known as Jerome Burke; December 1889 – 24 December 1969) was an American pulp magazine author, most famous for his stories of the occult detective Jules de Grandin, published in

Weird Tales.

The Night Side

The Night Side is an anthology of fantasy and horror stories edited by American writer August Derleth and illustrated by Lee Brown Coye. It was first published by Rinehart & Company in 1946. The stories had originally appeared in the magazines Amazing Stories, Collier's Weekly, Weird Tales, Saturday Review, The London Mercury, Unknown, Astounding Stories, Esquire, The Briarcliff Quarterly, Cosmopolitan, Blue Book, Top-Notch and Fantastic Adventures or in the collections The Clock Strikes Twelve, The Children of the Pool, Fearful Pleasures, Nights of the Round Table and My Grimmest Nightmare.

The Sleeping and the Dead

The Sleeping and the Dead is an anthology of fantasy and horror stories edited by American writet August Derleth. It was first published by Pellegrini & Cudahy in 1947. Many of the stories had originally appeared in the magazines The London Mercury, Weird Tales, Scribner's, Dublin University Magazine, Unknown, Esquire, The Bellman, Vanity Fair and Black Mask. An abridged edition (15 stories) was published by Four Square Books in 1963 under the same title.

The Unquiet Grave (anthology)

The Unquiet Grave is an anthology of fantasy and horror stories edited by American writer August Derleth. It was first published by Four Square Books in 1964. The anthology contains 15 stories from Derleth's earlier anthology The Sleeping and the Dead. Many of the stories had originally appeared in the magazines Weird Tales, Esquire and Black Mask.

Travellers by Night

Travellers by Night is an anthology of horror stories edited by American writer August Derleth. It was released in 1967 by Arkham House in an edition of 2,486 copies. None of the stories had been previously published.

Weird Tales (anthology series)

Weird Tales was a series of paperback anthologies, a revival of the classic fantasy and horror magazine of the same title, published by Zebra Books from 1980 to 1983 under the editorship of Lin Carter. It was issued more or less annually, though the first two volumes were issued simultaneously and there was a year’s gap between the third and fourth. It was preceded and succeeded by versions of the title in standard magazine form.

Each volume featured thirteen or fourteen novelettes, short stories and poems, including both new works by various fantasy authors and reprints from authors associated with the original Weird Tales, together with an editorial and introductory notes to the individual pieces by the editor. Authors whose works were featured included Robert Aickman, James Anderson, Robert H. Barlow, Robert Bloch, Hannes Bok, Ray Bradbury, Joseph Payne Brennan, Diane and John Brizzolara, Ramsey Campbell, Mary Elizabeth Counselman, August Derleth, Nictzin Dyalhis, Lloyd Arthur Eshbach, Robert E. Howard, Carl Jacobi, David H. Keller, Marc Laidlaw, Tanith Lee, Frank Belknap Long, Jr., H. P. Lovecraft, Robert A. W. Lowndes, Brian Lumley, Gary Myers, R. Faraday Nelson, Frank Owen, Gerald W. Page, Seabury Quinn, Anthony M. Rud, Charles Sheffield, Clark Ashton Smith, Stuart H. Stock, Steve Rasnic Tem, Evangeline Walton, Donald Wandrei, and Manly Wade Wellman, as well as Carter himself.

Carter habitually padded out the volumes he edited with a few his own works, whether written singly or in collaboration (the latter generally "posthumous collaborations" with Clark Ashton Smith in which he wrote stories on the basis of unused titles or story ideas from Smith’s notebooks).

Weird Tales 1

Weird Tales #1 is an anthology edited by Lin Carter, the first in his paperback revival of the classic fantasy and horror magazine Weird Tales. It is also numbered vol. 48, no. 1 (Spring 1981) in continuation of the numbering of the original magazine. The anthology was first published in paperback by American publisher Zebra Books in December 1980, and reprinted in 1983.

The book collects fourteen novelettes, short stories and poems by various fantasy authors, including both new works by various fantasy authors and reprints from authors associated with the original Weird Tales, together with an editorial and introductory notes to the individual pieces by the editor. The pieces include a "posthumous collaboration" (the story by Smith and Carter).

Weird Tales 2

Weird Tales #2 is an anthology edited by Lin Carter, the second in his paperback revival of the American fantasy and horror magazine Weird Tales. It is also numbered vol. 48, no. 2 (Spring 1981) in continuation of the numbering of the original magazine. The anthology was first published in paperback by Zebra Books in December 1980, simultaneously with the first volume in the anthology series.

The book collects fourteen novelettes, short stories and poems by various fantasy authors, including both new works by various fantasy authors and reprints from authors associated with the original Weird Tales, together with an editorial and introductory notes to the individual pieces by the editor. The pieces include a "posthumous collaboration" (the story by Smith and Carter).

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