Marvin Upshaw

Marvin Allen "Marv" Upshaw (born November 22, 1946 in Robstown, Texas) is a former American football defensive lineman in the National Football League. He played nine seasons for the Cleveland Browns (1968–1969), the Kansas City Chiefs (1970–1975) and the St. Louis Cardinals (1976).

He is the younger brother of the late Gene Upshaw, who was an offensive lineman for the Oakland Raiders, executive director of the National Football League Players' Association (NFLPA) after retiring as an active player, and a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Marvin Upshaw
Born:November 22, 1946 (age 72)
Robstown, Texas
Career information
Position(s)Defensive end
CollegeTrinity, Texas
NFL draft1968 / Round: 1 / Pick 21
Career history
As player
1968–1969Cleveland Browns
1970–1975Kansas City Chiefs
1976St. Louis Cardinals
Career stats
1968 Cleveland Browns season

The 1968 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 19th season with the National Football League.

The Browns made it to the playoffs for the 2nd straight year thanks to an 8-game winning streak and the brilliant play of quarterback Bill Nelsen who replaced Frank Ryan as the starting quarterback prior to week 4 of their season.

1968 NFL/AFL Draft

The 1968 National Football League draft was part of the common draft, in the second year in which the NFL and AFL held a joint draft of college players. It took place at the Belmont Plaza Hotel in New York City on January 30–31, 1968.This was the last draft until 1980 in which the Washington Redskins exercised their first-round pick. Most of them were traded away by coach George Allen between 1971 and 1977 due to Allen's well-known preference for veteran players over rookies.

1969 Cleveland Browns season

The 1969 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 20th season with the National Football League and the last before the 1970 AFL-NFL Merger.

The Browns made it to the 1969 NFL Championship Game, where they fell to the Minnesota Vikings. The 1969 season would be the last year that Cleveland would win a postseason game until 1986. In addition, that victory over Dallas would also be the last time the Browns won a postseason game on the road as of 2017.

1970 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1970 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's debut season in the National Football League, the 7th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 11th overall. It began with the Chiefs attempting to defend their Super Bowl IV championship title but ended with a 7–5–2 record and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1967.

Following their championship success, the Chiefs traded running back Mike Garrett, who was the club's all-time leading rusher at the time, to San Diego after a week 3 loss in Denver, and replaced him in the lineup with Ed Podolak. Despite a 44–24 win against soon to be Super Bowl V Champion Baltimore on September 28 in just the second-ever telecast of ABC's Monday Night Football, the Chiefs owned a 3–3–1 record at the season's midpoint. One of the season's pivotal junctures came in a 17–17 tie against Oakland on November 1. The Chiefs were ahead 17–14 when Len Dawson apparently sealed the win, running for a first down which would have allowed Kansas City to run out the clock. While on the ground, Dawson was speared by Raiders defensive end Ben Davidson in an infamous incident that cost the Chiefs a victory and further inflamed the already heated Chiefs-Raiders rivalry. Wide receiver Otis Taylor retaliated and a bench-clearing brawl ensued. Offsetting penalties were called, nullifying Dawson's first down. The Chiefs were forced to punt and Raiders kicker George Blanda eventually booted a game-tying field goal with eight seconds remaining. Following the tie with Oakland the Chiefs' defense would permit only 43 points over the next 5 weeks, which included 4 wins and 6-6 tie with the St. Louis Cardinals at Municipal Stadium. The Cardinals had come into that game with a streak of three straight shutout wins. The Chiefs' D held St. Louis to a late FG as the game ended 6-6. After a 16-0 shutout of Denver the Chiefs had played to a 6-1-2 record over the past nine weeks to stand 7-3-2 with two weeks to play and very much looked like a team with a chance to defend its championship. Then came the big one at Oakland, the game that would decide who reigned supreme in pro football's toughest division. The game on December 12 was a Saturday stand-alone NBC national telecast. The Chiefs led early 3-0, and the game was tied 6-6 at the half. But the Raiders, behind the angry running of Marv Hubbard, dominated the 2nd half in a 20-6 AFC West title clinching win for Oakland. The Chiefs still had a slim hope for the AFC Wild Card spot. They however needed a win by a poor Buffalo team in Miami and then a Chiefs' win in San Diego to make the playoffs. Miami jumped to a 28-0 first quarter lead and rolled to a 45-7 win. The Chiefs warming up to play the Chargers saw the Miami blowout and knew their reign as Champions was over. Eliminated, the Chiefs played a uninspired sleep walk game, losing 31-13. In the end it was that tie in November with Oakland that ultimately cost the Chiefs the opportunity to win the AFC West division title as Kansas City finished the year with a 7–5–2 record, while the Raiders went 8–4–2. The rules were changed several years later to assess such penalties as the Davidson-Taylor incident as dead-ball fouls after the play counted.

1971 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1971 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 2nd season in the National Football League, the 9th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 12th overall. They improved from a 7–5–2 campaign in 1970 to record a 10–3–1 mark and win the AFC West division championship, the Chiefs' first division title since 1966. The Chiefs tied with the Miami Dolphins for the best record in the AFC and were tied for the third-best record overall in the NFL, trailing only the 11–3 marks of the Dallas Cowboys and Minnesota Vikings.

Most of the pieces of the team which won Super Bowl IV two years earlier were still in place. Left defensive end Jerry Mays retired after the 1970 season, with Marvin Upshaw taking his spot, but the other 10 defensive starters were the same as they were two years prior. Middle linebacker Willie Lanier was a unanimous All-Pro selection following the season, and would likely have been named NFL Defensive Player of the Year had not Viking defensive tackle Alan Page become the second defensive player to win the league's Most Valuable Player award. Outside linebacker Bobby Bell, defensive tackles Buck Buchanan and Curley Culp, and cornerback Emmitt Thomas joined Lanier on the AFC Pro Bowl squad following the season. Bell, Buchanan, Culp, Lanier, and Thomas are all members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

On offense, Robert Holmes was traded to the San Diego Chargers midway through the season, leaving Wendell Hayes to assume the fullback duties next to third-year pro Ed Podolak, who had become the starting halfback when Mike Garrett was traded to San Diego in 1970. Morris Stroud, the tallest player in NFL history at 6-foot-10, and Willie Frazier, acquired from San Diego, alternated at tight end for the retired Fred Arbanas, but the rest of the offensive line, save for center Jack Rudnay, remained the same from the Super Bowl winning team. Rudnay assumed the starting center spot in 1970 over veteran E. J. Holub. At wide receiver, rookie Elmo Wright, the Chiefs' first-round pick in the 1971 NFL Draft from the University of Houston, assumed the slot opposite all-pro Otis Taylor, as Frank Pitts had moved on to the Cleveland Browns. Taylor earned selection to the Pro Bowl, along with guard Ed Budde, quarterback Len Dawson, and tackle Jim Tyrer.

Kansas City's special teams remained among the league's elite units, thanks to the combination of kicker Jan Stenerud and punter Jerrel Wilson, both of whom were named to the Pro Bowl. Podolak and Warren McVea handled the bulk of the return duties.

The season was the last for the Chiefs in Municipal Stadium, as owner Lamar Hunt and general manager Jack Steadman were overseeing the construction of Arrowhead Stadium, located at the junction of Interstate 70 and Interstate 435 in Jackson County, Missouri, at the eastern edge of the Kansas City city limits. Arrowhead, along with Royals Stadium, being constructed for the Kansas City Royals of Major League Baseball, would form the Truman Sports Complex, bucking the trend of multi-purpose stadiums in vogue at the time.

The season ended in heartbreak, as the Miami Dolphins won the longest game in National Football League history on Christmas Day, defeating the Chiefs 27–24 in double-overtime on a 37-yard field goal by Garo Yepremian in the last football game in Municipal Stadium, as well as the last game for safety Johnny Robinson, who was an original member of the Dallas Texans in 1960. Coach Hank Stram often called the 1971 Chiefs the franchise's best-ever squad, and this loss haunted Stram for the rest of his life, even after his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Stram died July 4, 2005 at age 82. Others who are in the Hall of Fame from this squad are owner Hunt (who died December 13, 2006, at age 74), quarterback Dawson, and kicker Stenerud.

The loss to Miami began a nosedive in the Chiefs' fortunes. Kansas City backslid to 8–6 and 7–5–2 in 1972 and 1973, before falling to 5–9 and a tie for last in the AFC West in 1974, leading to the Stram's firing following the season. Kansas City would not reach the playoffs again until 1986, did not host (or win) another playoff game until 1991, and did not win the AFC West division title again until 1993.

1972 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1972 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 3rd season in the National Football League, the 10th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 13th overall. It would begin with the Chiefs moving into the newly constructed Arrowhead Stadium and ended with an 8–6 record and second-place finish in the AFC West.

The Chiefs introduced the newly completed Arrowhead Stadium to the general public. The last original member of the 1960 Dallas Texans team departed on July 12 when safety Johnny Robinson announced his retirement at training camp. Meanwhile, starting quarterback Len Dawson ended speculation about his retirement by signing a two-year contract. Franchise owner Lamar Hunt became the first AFL figure to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on July 29.After two different construction strikes and a myriad of other delays, Arrowhead Stadium was officially dedicated on August 12, when the Chiefs registered a 24–14 preseason victory against the St. Louis Cardinals. Running back Ed Podolak scored the first touchdown in the facility. Regular season ticket prices for the team's first season at Arrowhead were USD$8 for box seats and $7 for reserved seating.On September 17, the Chiefs lost a 20–10 decision against Miami (the first win in Miami's perfect season) in the first official game at the new Arrowhead Stadium, in front of a crowd of 79,829. A standing-room-only crowd of 82,094 was in attendance for a 27–14 victory against Oakland on November 5, the largest “in-house” attendance total for an NFL contest in Arrowhead's history. After a 5–3 start, a three-game losing streak effectively eliminated the club from playoff contention. An 8–6 record was only good enough for a second-place finish in the AFC West behind Oakland. Linebacker Willie Lanier became the first Chiefs player to receive the prestigious NFL Man of the Year Award in the offseason.In week six, the Chiefs dropped a shocking 21–20 decision at home to the lowly Philadelphia Eagles, who entered the game 0–5 and would win only once more (also a one-point victory over the Houston Oilers, who finished 1–13). It would be the only time the Chiefs and Eagles met until 1992, and Kansas City would never visit Philadelphia before 1998.

1973 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1973 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 4th season in the National Football League, the 11th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 14th overall. they finished with a 7–5–2 record and missed the playoffs for the 2nd straight year.

The defense kept the club in contention thanks to a nucleus that still included the bulk of the squad's Super Bowl IV starters. Quarterback Mike Livingston started in a 23–13 Opening Day loss against the Los Angeles Rams on September 16, but Len Dawson returned to rally the club for three consecutive wins to get the club off to a 3–1 start for a third consecutive year. The aging Len Dawson made his final start of the year in a 23–14 loss at Buffalo on October 29 and was replaced for the remainder of the year by Livingston, beginning a string of three straight seasons in which both players split time at the position.Livingston led the club to another three straight wins, putting the team in first place in mid-November with a 6–3–1 record. A 1–2–1 ledger over the season’s final month ended the club’s post-season aspirations as the team finished the year in a second-place tie with Denver at 7–5–2. Len Dawson became the second Chiefs player in as many years to win the NFL Man of the Year Award. Following Super Bowl VIII, The AFC-NFC Pro Bowl was held at Arrowhead Stadium on January 20 with the AFC claiming a 15–13 win thanks to five field goals from Miami placekicker Garo Yepremian.

1974 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1974 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 5th season in the National Football League, the 12th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 15th overall, it ended with a 5–9 record and the Chiefs missed the playoffs for the 3rd straight year and third-place finish in the AFC West, Hank Stram was fired after the season and was replaced by Paul Wiggin in 1975.

While the club's sparkling new facility at Arrowhead Stadium was drawing rave reviews, the Chiefs roster was beginning to show its age. The result was the team's first losing season in 11 years as the club was unable to string together consecutive victories during the year, a first in franchise history. Many of the club's key players were entering the twilight of their careers: Len Dawson was 39, Jim Tyrer was 35, Bobby Bell, Buck Buchanan, and Ed Budde were 34, Dave Hill was 33 and Otis Taylor was 32.One of the year's few bright spots in the 5–9 season was cornerback Emmitt Thomas, who led the league with a franchise-record 12 interceptions. The final game of the 1974 campaign marked the final time all seven of Kansas City's Pro Football Hall of Fame players from the club's AFL champion era took the field together with coach Hank Stram. Including owner Lamar Hunt and seven future Minnesota Vikings Hall of Famers, an amazing total of 16 Hall of Fame inductees were involved in that 1974 season finale game. That 35–15 loss against Minnesota provided an anticlimactic conclusion to Hank Stram's illustrious coaching career in Kansas City. Three days later, Stram, the only head coach in franchise history was relieved of his duties on December 27 after compiling a 124–76–10 regular season record with the club.

1975 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1975 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 6th season in the National Football League, the 13th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 16th overall, it ended with a second consecutive 5–9 record and the Chiefs missed the playoffs for the 4th straight year.

San Francisco 49ers defensive coordinator Paul Wiggin was named the second head coach in franchise history on January 23. A former Pro Bowl defensive end for the Cleveland Browns, Wiggin inherited the unenviable task of rebuilding a squad whose pool of talent had been largely depleted due to age and a number of ill-fated trades that had left the club devoid of first-round draft choices in 1973 and 1975. After an 0–3 start to the season, Wiggin directed the Chiefs to three straight wins, beginning with a convincing 42–10 victory against the Raiders on October 12. The highlight of the season was a 34–31 upset win at Dallas on Monday Night Football. The club could not maintain the early success; Owning a 5–5 record heading into the homestretch of the season, injuries to a number of key players crippled the team. The team dropped its final four contests of the year to finish at 5–9 for the second consecutive season. The regular season finale at Oakland marked the final games in the Hall of Fame careers of Len Dawson and Buck Buchanan.

Gene Upshaw

Eugene Josiah Upshaw Jr. (August 15, 1945 – August 20, 2008), also known as "Uptown Gene" and “Highway 63”, was an American football player for the Oakland Raiders of the American Football League (AFL) and later the National Football League (NFL). He later served as the executive director of the National Football League Players' Association (NFLPA). In 1987, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He is also the only player in NFL history to reach the Super Bowl in three different decades with the same team.

List of Trinity University (Texas) people

The following is a list of notable people associated with Trinity University, located in the American city of San Antonio, Texas.

List of family relations in American football

The following is a list of family relations in American football.

Adamle – Tony Adamle (father), Mike Adamle (son)

Adams – Julius Adams (father), Keith Adams (son)

Adams – Sam Adams Sr. (father), Sam Adams Jr. (son)

Agnew – Ray Agnew Jr. (father), Ray Agnew III (son)

Aldridge – Allen Aldridge Sr. (father), Allen Aldridge Jr. (son)

Anderson – Flipper Anderson (father), Dres Anderson (son)

Atkinson – George Atkinson Jr. (father), George Atkinson III (son)

Ayodele – Akin Ayodele, Remi Ayodele (brothers)

Ayanbadejo – Obafemi Ayanbadejo, Brendon Ayanbadejo (brothers)

Bahr – Chris Bahr, Matt Bahr (brothers)

Bailey – Champ Bailey, Boss Bailey (brothers)

Bakhtiari – Eric Bakhtiari, David Bakhtiari (brothers)

Barber – Ronde Barber, Tiki Barber (twin brothers)

Barber – Marion Barber Jr. (father); Marion Barber III, Dominique Barber (sons)

Belichick – Steve Belichick (father); Bill Belichick (son); Stephen Belichick (grandson)

Bennett – Michael Bennett, Martellus Bennett (brothers)

Berry – Eric Berry, Evan Berry (brothers)

Blackwood – Lyle Blackwood, Glenn Blackwood (brothers)

Blades – Bennie Blades, Brian Blades (brothers), H.B. Blades (son of Bennie)

Bolden/Pitts – Brandon Bolden and Frank Pitts (grandson and grandfather)

Bosa/Kumerow – John Bosa (father), Eric Kumerow (brother-in-law), Joey Bosa (son of John, nephew of Eric), Nick Bosa (son of John, nephew of Eric)

Bowden – Bobby Bowden (father); Tommy Bowden, Jeff Bowden, Terry Bowden (sons).

Bradshaw – Terry Bradshaw, Craig Bradshaw (brothers)

Brown – Orlando Brown (father), Orlando Brown Jr. (son)

Brown/Thompkins – Eddie Brown (father), Antonio Brown (son), Kenbrell Thompkins (cousin of Antonio)

Burns/McClover - Stanley McClover, Brian Burns (brothers)

Bush - Devin Bush (father), Devin Bush Jr. (son)

Butkus – Dick Butkus (uncle), Luke Butkus (nephew)

Byrd – Gill Byrd (father), Jairus Byrd (son)

Caldwell – Andre Caldwell, Reche Caldwell (brothers)

Carpenter – Rob Carpenter (father), Bobby Carpenter (son)

Carr – David Carr, Derek Carr (brothers)

Carter – Cris Carter (father), Duron Carter (son)

Cash – Keith Cash, Kerry Cash (brothers)

Castille – Jeremiah Castille (father), Tim Castille (son)

Celek – Brent Celek, Garrett Celek (brothers)

Chickillo – Nick Chickillo (father), Tony Chickillo (son), Anthony Chickillo (grandson)

Chubb – Bradley Chubb, Brandon Chubb (brothers); Nick Chubb (cousin)

Clausen – Casey Clausen, Jimmy Clausen, Rick Clausen (brothers)

Cline – Tony Cline (father); Tony Cline Jr. (son)

Coffman – Paul Coffman (father), Chase Coffman (son)

Colquitt – Craig Colquitt, Jimmy Colquitt (cousins); Britton Colquitt, Dustin Colquitt (sons of Craig, nephews of Jimmy)

Cox – Bryan Cox (father), Bryan Cox Jr. (son)

Cromartie/Rodgers-Cromartie/Cromartie-Smith – Antonio Cromartie, Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, Da'Mon Cromartie-Smith, Marcus Cromartie (cousins)

Crumpler – Alge Crumpler, Carlester Crumpler (brothers)

Cunningham – Sam Cunningham, Randall Cunningham (brothers)

Davis – Vernon Davis, Vontae Davis (brothers)

Dawkins – Brian Dawkins (uncle), Dalyn Dawkins (nephew)

DeOssie – Steve DeOssie (father), Zak DeOssie (son)

Derby – Glenn Derby (uncle), A. J. Derby (nephew)

Detmer – Ty Detmer, Koy Detmer (brothers)

Dimitroff – Tom Dimitroff (father), Thomas Dimitroff (son)

Dixon – Brian Dixon, Brandon Dixon (twin brothers)

Donelli – Aldo Donelli; Allen Donelli (brothers)

Dorsett – Tony Dorsett (father), Anthony Dorsett (son)

Edwards – Mario Edwards (father), Mario Edwards Jr. (son)

Ellington – Andre Ellington, Bruce Ellington (cousins)

Ellison – Riki Ellison (father), Rhett Ellison (son)

Elway – Jack Elway (father), John Elway (son)

Fahnhorst – Keith Fahnhorst, Jim Fahnhorst (brothers)

Farmer – George Farmer (father), Danny Farmer (son)

Farr – Mel Farr (father); Mel Farr Jr., Mike Farr (sons)

Fassel – Jim Fassel (father), John Fassel (son)

Fells – Daniel Fells, Darren Fells (brothers)

Flacco – Joe Flacco, Mike Flacco (brothers)

Fletcher – Bryan Fletcher, Terrell Fletcher (brothers)

Fuller – Vincent Fuller, Corey Fuller, Kyle Fuller, Kendall Fuller (brothers)

Gbaja-Biamila – Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila, Akbar Gbaja-Biamila (brothers)

Gaffney – Derrick Gaffney (father), Jabar Gaffney (son)

Geathers – Robert Geathers Sr., Jumpy Geathers (brothers); Robert Geathers Jr., Clifton Geathers, Kwame Geathers (sons of Robert Sr.), Clayton Geathers, Jeremy Geathers (cousins)

Gerhart – Toby Gerhart, Garth Gerhart (brothers)

Gogolak – Pete Gogolak, Charlie Gogolak (brothers)

Golic – Bob Golic, Mike Golic (brothers), Mike Golic Jr. (nephew of Bob, son of Mike)

Gramatica – Martín Gramática, Bill Gramatica (brothers)

Grange – Garland Grange, Red Grange (brothers)

Green – A. J. Green, T. J. Green (cousins)

Griese – Bob Griese (father); Brian Griese (son)

Griffin – Shaquem Griffin, Shaquill Griffin (twin brothers)

Gronkowski – Rob Gronkowski, Dan Gronkowski, Chris Gronkowski, Glenn Gronkowski (brothers)

Gruden – Jon Gruden, Jay Gruden (brothers)

Hager – Britt Hager (father), Bryce Hager (son)

Hakim – Az-Zahir Hakim, Saalim Hakim (brothers)

Hambrick – Darren Hambrick, Troy Hambrick (brothers)

Hannah – Herb Hannah (father); John Hannah, Charley Hannah (sons)

Harbaugh – Jack Harbaugh (father); John Harbaugh, Jim Harbaugh (sons)

Hasselbeck – Don Hasselbeck (father); Matt Hasselbeck, Tim Hasselbeck (sons)

Heyward – Craig Heyward (father); Cameron Heyward (son)

Highsmith – Alonzo Highsmith (father), Alonzo Highsmith Jr. (son)

Hilgenberg – Jerry Hilgenberg (father); Wally Hilgenberg (brother); Jay Hilgenberg, Joel Hilgenberg (sons of Jerry)

Hochuli – Shawn Hochuli (father); Ed Hochuli (son) (family of referees)

Holt – Terrence Holt, Torry Holt (brothers)

Huard – Damon Huard, Brock Huard (brothers)

Ihenacho – Carl Ihenacho, Duke Ihenacho (brothers)

Ingram – Mark Ingram Sr. (father), Mark Ingram Jr. (son)

Ismail – Raghib Ismail, Qadry Ismail (brothers)

Jenkins – Kris Jenkins, Cullen Jenkins (brothers)

Jerry – John Jerry, Peria Jerry (brothers)

Johnson/Thomas - Keyshawn Johnson (uncle), Michael Thomas (nephew)

Jones – Jerry Jones (father), Jerry Jones Jr., Stephen Jones (sons)

Jones – Julius Jones, Thomas Jones (brothers)

Jones-Drew/Ward – Maurice Jones-Drew, T. J. Ward (cousins)

Jordan – Steve Jordan (father), Cameron Jordan (son)

Kalil – Ryan Kalil, Matt Kalil (brothers)

Kearse/Buchanon – Jevon Kearse (uncle), Jayron Kearse (nephew), Phillip Buchanon (cousin of Jayron)

Kelce – Jason Kelce, Travis Kelce (brothers)

Kendricks – Mychal Kendricks, Eric Kendricks (brothers)

Kupp – Jake Kupp (father), Craig Kupp (son), Cooper Kupp (grandson)

Landry – Dawan Landry, LaRon Landry (brothers)

Leggett – Earl Leggett (father), Brad Leggett (son)

Little – Larry Little, David Little (brothers)

Long – Howie Long (father); Chris Long, Kyle Long (sons)

Lott/Nece – Ronnie Lott (father), Ryan Nece (son)

Luck – Oliver Luck (father), Andrew Luck (son)

Lusk – Herbert H. Lusk, Hendrick Hamilton Lusk, Harold Hollingsworth Lusk, (brothers)

Lynch/Johnson/Russell – Marshawn Lynch; Josh Johnson, JaMarcus Russell (cousins)

Manning – Archie Manning (father); Peyton Manning, Eli Manning (sons)

Marion – Jerry Marion (father), Brock Marion (son)

Martin – Nick Martin, Zack Martin (brothers)

Mays – Stafford Mays (father), Taylor Mays (son)

Matthews/Niklas – Clay Matthews, Sr. (father); Clay Matthews, Jr., Bruce Matthews (sons), Clay Matthews III, Kevin Matthews, Casey Matthews, Jake Matthews, Mike Matthews (grandsons), Troy Niklas (Bruce Matthews' nephew)

McCaffrey – Ed McCaffrey (father); Max McCaffrey and Christian McCaffrey (sons)

McAlister – James McAlister (father), Chris McAlister (son)

McClendon – Willie McClendon (father), Bryan McClendon (son)

McCourty – Devin McCourty, Jason McCourty (twin brothers)

McCown – Josh McCown, Luke McCown (brothers)

McCutcheon – Lawrence McCutcheon (father), Daylon McCutcheon (son)

McDonald – Tim McDonald (father); T. J. McDonald, Tevin McDonald (sons)

McDougle – Jerome McDougle, Stockar McDougle (brothers)• McFadden-Darren McFadden-Reggie Swinton (Cousins)

McKay – John McKay (father), John McKay Jr., Rich McKay (sons)

McKenzie – Raleigh McKenzie, Reggie McKenzie (twin brothers)

McKinney – Steve McKinney, Seth McKinney (brothers)

McMillan – Ernie McMillan (father), Erik McMillan (son)

McTyer – Tim McTyer (father), Torry McTyer (son)

Metcalf – Terry Metcalf (father), Eric Metcalf (son)

Mike-Mayer – Nick Mike-Mayer, Steve Mike-Mayer (brothers)

Montgomery– Wilbert Montgomery, Cle Montgomery, Tyrone Montgomery, Fred Montgomery (brothers)

Moorehead – Emery Moorehead (father), Aaron Moorehead (son)

Mora – Jim E. Mora (father), Jim L. Mora (son)

Moss – Eric Moss, Randy Moss (brothers)

Moss – Santana Moss, Sinorice Moss (brothers)

Murray - Kevin Murray (father), Kyler Murray (son)

Nolan – Dick Nolan (father), Mike Nolan (son)

Nassib – Carl Nassib, Ryan Nassib (brothers)

Nesser/Schneider/Hopkins - Al Nesser, Frank Nesser, Fred Nesser, John Nesser, Phil Nesser, Ted Nesser (brothers), [[John Schneider]] (brother-in-law), Charlie Nesser (Ted Nesser's son), [[Ted Hopkins]] (Charlie Nesser's cousin)

Newton – Cam Newton, Cecil Newton (brothers)

Ogden – Jonathan Ogden, Marques Ogden (brothers)

Olsen – Merlin Olsen, Orrin Olsen, Phil Olsen (brothers)

Pagano – Chuck Pagano, John Pagano (brothers)

Palmer – Carson Palmer, Jordan Palmer (brothers)

Payton – Eddie Payton, Walter Payton (brothers); Jarrett Payton (son of Walter)

Peko – Domata Peko, Tupe Peko (brothers), Kyle Peko (cousin)

Perkins – Don Perkins (great-uncle), Paul Perkins (great-nephew)

Perriman – Brett Perriman (father), Breshad Perriman (son)

Perry – Michael Dean Perry, William Perry (brothers)

Petrino – Bobby Petrino, Paul Petrino (brothers)

Phillips – Bum Phillips (father), Wade Phillips (son), Wes Phillips (grandson)

Pouncey – Maurkice Pouncey, Mike Pouncey (twin brothers)

Pyne – George Pyne II (father), George Pyne III (son), Jim Pyne (grandson)

Randle – Ervin Randle, John Randle (brothers)

Reed – Brooks Reed, Lucas Reed (brothers)

Reid – Eric Reid, Justin Reid (brothers)

Rice/Matthews – Jerry Rice (father), Jerry Rice Jr. (son); Jordan Matthews (cousin of the Rices)

Robiskie – Terry Robiskie (father), Andrew Robiskie, Brian Robiskie (sons)

Rodgers – Aaron Rodgers, Jordan Rodgers (brothers)

Ryan – Buddy Ryan (father); Rex Ryan, Rob Ryan (twin sons)

Salaam – Sulton Salaam (father); Rashaan Salaam (son)

Sanders – Barry Sanders (father), Barry J. Sanders (son)

Sauer – George Sauer (father); George Sauer Jr. (son)

Saul – Bill Saul, Rich Saul and Ron Saul (twin brothers)

Schwartz – Geoff Schwartz; Mitchell Schwartz (brothers)

Selmon – Dewey Selmon, Lee Roy Selmon (brothers)

Shanahan – Mike Shanahan (father), Kyle Shanahan (son)

Sharpe – Sterling Sharpe, Shannon Sharpe (brothers)

Sharper – Jamie Sharper, Darren Sharper (brothers).

Shepard – Darrell Shepard and Derrick Shepard (brothers); Sterling Shepard (son of Derrick)

Shula – Don Shula (father); Dave Shula, Mike Shula (sons).

Shuler – Mickey Shuler (father); Mickey Shuler, Jr. (son)

Simms – Phil Simms (father); Chris Simms, Matt Simms (sons)

Slater – Jackie Slater (father); Matthew Slater (son).

Smith – Rod Smith, Jaylon Smith (brothers)

Smith – Malcolm Smith, Steve Smith (brothers)

Spikes – Brandon Spikes, Takeo Spikes (cousins)

Stoops – Bob Stoops, Mike Stoops, Mark Stoops (brothers)

Sudfeld – Nate Sudfeld, Zach Sudfeld (brothers)

Suhey – Steve Suhey (father), Matt Suhey (son)

Talbert – Don Talbert, Diron Talbert (brothers)

Tatupu – Mosi Tatupu (father), Lofa Tatupu (son)

Taylor – Fred Taylor (father), Kelvin Taylor (son)

Trufant – Desmond Trufant, Isaiah Trufant, Marcus Trufant (brothers)

Tuiasosopo – Manu Tuiasosopo (father), Marques Tuiasosopo (son)

Turk – Matt Turk, Dan Turk (brothers)

Upshaw – Gene Upshaw, Marvin Upshaw (brothers)

Urlacher – Brian Urlacher, Casey Urlacher (brothers)

Van Buren – Steve Van Buren, Ebert Van Buren (brothers)

Vereen – Shane Vereen, Brock Vereen (brothers)

Vick/Brooks – Michael Vick, Marcus Vick (brothers); Aaron Brooks (cousin to the Vicks)

Ward – Terron Ward, T. J. Ward (brothers)

Washington – Ted Washington Sr. (father), Ted Washington Jr. (son)

Watkins – Jaylen Watkins, Sammy Watkins (brothers)

Watt – J. J. Watt, Derek Watt, T. J. Watt (brothers)

Westbrook – Brian Westbrook, Byron Westbrook (brothers)

Whitehurst – David Whitehurst (father), Charlie Whitehurst (son)

Wilson – George Wilson (father), George Wilson Jr. (son)

Winslow – Kellen Winslow (father); Kellen Winslow II (son)

Wisniewski – Leo Wisniewski, Steve Wisniewski (brothers), Stefen Wisniewski (son of Leo, nephew of Steve)

Young – Willie Young (father); Rodney Young (son)

Zendejas - Luis Zendejas, Max Zendejas, Joaquin Zendejas (brothers), and Tony Zendejas (cousin)

Prairie View Interscholastic League

The Prairie View Interscholastic League (PVIL) was the organization that governed academic and athletic competitions between African-American high schools in Texas for much of the 20th century. The organization's structure and operations were similar to the University Interscholastic League (UIL) and it disbanded shortly after the UIL admitted black high schools in the 1960s. A number of former PVIL football players were inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame after successful professional careers.

Robstown, Texas

Robstown is a city in Nueces County, Texas, United States, and a western suburb of Corpus Christi. It was founded about 1906, and was named for Robert Driscoll. The population was 11,487 as of the 2010 census.

The Texas State Legislature officially recognizes Robstown as the birthplace of Texas hold 'em poker.

Robstown High School

Robstown Early College High School is an AAAA secondary school located in the Corpus Christi suburb-city of Robstown, Texas. The school handles grades 9 through 12. RECHS primarily serves the city, yet it enrolls students from nearby school districts such as Banquete, Calallen, Tuloso-Midway, and the census-designated community of North San Pedro. Robstown Early College High School has neighborhood and Advanced Placement programs. The school has gained fame for its mascot, the "Cottonpicker". The Robstown Early College High School marching band is known to be one of the rivals of the HM King High School Brahma marching band. The band is also known as "The Big Red Band From Pickerland." The band has won numerous awards for excellence and has also been awarded "Sweepstakes" status. Robstown Early College High School's student body is primarily Hispanic.

Southland Conference

The Southland Conference, abbreviated to SLC, is a collegiate athletic conference which operates in the South Central United States (specifically Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas). It participates in the NCAA's Division I for all sports; for football, it participates in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS). The Southland sponsors 17 sports, nine for women and eight for men (it will add an 18th overall sport and 10th for women for the 2019-20 academic year with beach volleyball), and is governed by a presidential Board of Directors and an Advisory Council of athletic and academic administrators. Tom Burnett was named the Southland's sixth commissioner on Dec. 23, 2002. From 1996 to 2002, for football only, the Southland Conference was known as the Southland Football League.The conference's offices are located in the Dallas suburb of Frisco, Texas.

Upshaw

Upshaw is a surname of English origin. Notable people with this name include:

Cecil Upshaw (1942–1995), American baseball player

Courtney Upshaw (born 1989), American football player

Dawn Upshaw (born 1960), American operatic and classical soprano

Gene Upshaw (1945–2008), American football player

Grace Upshaw (born 1975), American Olympic track and field athlete

Jessica Upshaw (1959–2013), American politician and lawyer

Kelvin Upshaw (born 1963), American basketball player

L. W. Upshaw, American college football coach

Marvin Upshaw (born 1946), American football player

Orrin Upshaw (1874–1937), American Olympic tug-of-war athlete

Regan Upshaw (born 1975), American football player

Robert Upshaw (born 1994), American basketball player

T. D. Upshaw (fl. 1930–1931), American college football coach

William D. Upshaw (1866–1952), American prohibitionist and politician from Georgia; U.S. representative 1919–27

Willie Upshaw (born 1957), American baseball player

Zeke Upshaw (1991–2018), American basketball player

Willie Upshaw

Willie Clay Upshaw (born April 27, 1957 in Blanco, Texas) is a retired Major League Baseball player who played first base for the Toronto Blue Jays (1978, 1980–1987) and Cleveland Indians (1988), both of the American League.

Following his Major League career, he played two seasons in Japan for the Fukuoka Daiei Hawks (1989–1990).

He was later the field manager of the independent minor league Bridgeport Bluefish.

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