Marvin Harrison

Marvin Darnell Harrison (born August 25, 1972) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Syracuse University, and was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts in the first round of the 1996 NFL Draft. He spent all 13 of his NFL seasons with the Colts, most of them with quarterback Peyton Manning, and is widely considered as one of the greatest and most productive wide receivers in NFL history.[1] He earned a Super Bowl ring with the team in Super Bowl XLI over the Chicago Bears.

Harrison was a Pro Football Hall of Fame finalist for the Classes of 2014 and 2015 before being elected in 2016, the same year his former coach Tony Dungy was voted into the Hall.[2]

Marvin Harrison
refer to caption
Harrison with the Indianapolis Colts in 2007
No. 88
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:August 25, 1972 (age 46)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:185 lb (84 kg)
Career information
High school:Philadelphia (PA) Roman Catholic
College:Syracuse
NFL Draft:1996 / Round: 1 / Pick: 19
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:1,102
Receiving yards:14,580
Receiving touchdowns:128
Player stats at NFL.com

College career

Harrison attended Syracuse University, where he was a three-year starter for the Syracuse Orange football team, playing with quarterback Donovan McNabb in his final year. Harrison set a school record with 2,718 career receiving yards and ranked second in school history with 20 receiving touchdowns to Rob Moore. Harrison graduated with a degree in Retail Management.[3]

Collegiate statistics

Year Team G GS Rec Yards AVG TD
1992 SYR 10 0 2 13 6.5 0
1993 SYR 11 9 41 813 19.8 7
1994 SYR 10 10 36 761 21.1 5
1995 SYR 11 11 56 1,131 20.2 8
Total 42 30 135 2,718 20.1 20

Professional career

Harrison was selected by the Indianapolis Colts with the 19th selection in the 1996 NFL Draft, a selection which was obtained in a trade that sent Jeff George to the Atlanta Falcons. Harrison went on to become one of the most productive receivers from that draft class, which included Keyshawn Johnson, Eric Moulds, Bobby Engram, Muhsin Muhammad, Eddie Kennison, Terry Glenn, Amani Toomer, Joe Horn, and Terrell Owens among others.

In 2002, Harrison broke Herman Moore's single season receptions record by 20 receptions. He finished with 143 catches, and he also had 1,722 yards receiving. In December 2006, Harrison became just the fourth player in NFL history to record 1000 receptions, joining Jerry Rice (1549), Cris Carter (1101), and Tim Brown (1094). He is also one of only seven wide receivers in NFL history to reach 100 touchdowns.

In 2005, Harrison had five 100+ yard receiving games in a seven game stretch late in the season. During Week 15, he passed Isaac Bruce to become 10th in all-time career receiving yards, and also the leader among active players. He maintained this title for exactly two seasons, until Bruce retook the lead in Week 15 of 2007. Harrison had injured his knee against the Denver Broncos while attempting a block and was lost for the season, making only a small appearance in their lone playoff game that season. It marked only the second time Harrison had missed regular season action due to injuries and the first since 1998.

On December 14, 2008, in a game against the Detroit Lions, Harrison caught his 1,095th career reception, passing Tim Brown for third all time. He passed Cris Carter to become second on the all-time NFL reception record list with 1,102 receptions during a 23–0 Colts victory over the Tennessee Titans on December 28, 2008.

Following the 2008 NFL season, Harrison asked for and was granted his release by the Colts.[4] After sitting out the entire 2009 season, Harrison quietly retired from the NFL.[5]

Harrison was inducted into the Indianapolis Colts Ring of Honor during the week 12 game against the Carolina Panthers on November 27, 2011.[6] Harrison is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[7][8]

NFL career statistics

Legend
Led the league
NFL record
Bold Career high

Regular season

Season Team Games Receiving Rushing Fumbles
GP GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
1996 IND 16 15 64 836 13.1 41 8 3 15 5.0 15 0 1 1
1997 IND 16 15 73 866 11.9 44 6 2 -7 -3.5 0 0 2 0
1998 IND 12 12 59 776 13.2 61T 7
1999 IND 16 16 115 1,663 14.5 57T 12 1 4 4.0 4 0 2 1
2000 IND 16 16 102 1,413 13.9 78T 14 2 1
2001 IND 16 16 109 1,524 14.0 68 15 1 3 3.0 3 0
2002 IND 16 16 143 1,722 12.0 69 11 2 10 5.0 8 0
2003 IND 15 15 94 1,272 13.5 79T 10 1 3 3.0 3 0 2 2
2004 IND 16 16 86 1,113 12.9 59 15 1 1
2005 IND 15 15 82 1,146 14.0 80T 12
2006 IND 16 16 95 1,366 14.4 68T 12 1 1
2007 IND 5 5 20 247 12.4 42 1
2008 IND 15 15 60 636 10.6 67T 5 1 1
Total 190 188 1,102 14,580 13.2 80 128 10 28 2.8 15 0 12 8

Postseason

Season Team Games Receiving Rushing Fumbles
GP GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
1996 IND 1 1 3 71 23.7 48 0
1999 IND 1 1 5 65 13.0 25 0
2000 IND 1 1 5 63 12.6 30 0
2002 IND 1 1 4 47 11.8 17 0
2003 IND 3 3 16 250 15.6 46 2 1 1
2004 IND 2 2 9 95 10.6 24 0
2005 IND 1 1 3 52 17.3 24 0
2006 IND 4 4 15 193 12.9 42 0 1 0
2007 IND 1 1 2 27 13.5 17 0 1 1
2008 IND 1 1 3 20 6.7 9 0
Total 16 16 65 883 13.6 48 2 3 2

NFL records

  • Most receptions in a single season with 143, set in 2002
  • Most receptions in a 7 season period (731), 1999–2005; 8 season period (826), 1999–2006; 9 season period (885), 1998–2006; 10 season period (958), 1997–2006; 11 season period (1,022), 1996–2006
  • Most games in a career with at least 8 receptions (51), 9 receptions (32), 11 receptions (12), 12 receptions (8)
  • Most consecutive games with at least 6 receptions (16) and 9 receptions (6)
  • Most consecutive seasons with at least 5 touchdowns (11) – shared with Jerry Rice, Don Hutson, Cris Carter, Tim Brown, Terrell Owens, Frank Gore
  • Most consecutive seasons with at least 6 touchdowns (11) – shared with Terrell Owens, Jerry Rice, Don Hutson
  • Most consecutive seasons with at least 5 touchdown receptions (11) – shared with Jerry Rice, Don Hutson, Cris Carter, Tim Brown, Terrell Owens
  • Most consecutive seasons with at least 6 touchdown receptions (11) – shared with Jerry Rice, Don Hutson
  • Most consecutive seasons with at least 10 touchdown receptions (8)
  • Most consecutive seasons with at least 11 touchdown receptions (4)-tied with Lance Alworth, Art Powell
  • Most consecutive seasons with at least 14 touchdown receptions (2)-tied with Jerry Rice
  • Consecutive seasons with 1,400+ receiving yards (4); 1999–2002
  • Consecutive seasons with 82+ receptions (8); 1999–2006
  • Most games in a single season (2002) with at least 6 receptions (15), 7 receptions (12)-broken by Antonio Brown, 8 receptions (12), 9 receptions (10)-tied by Julio Jones, 11 receptions (5)
  • Marvin Harrison and Peyton Manning currently hold the NFL record for most completions between a Wide Receiver and Quarterback with 953.
  • Marvin Harrison and Peyton Manning currently hold the NFL record for passing touchdowns between a WR and QB with 112.
  • Marvin Harrison and Peyton Manning currently hold the NFL record for passing yards between a WR and QB with 12,756.
  • Marvin Harrison and Peyton Manning currently hold the NFL record for completions in a season between a WR and QB with 143 in 2002.
  • First player to record 2 seasons of 1,600 yards receiving in NFL history, (1999 & 2002). (Torry Holt became the 2nd, (2000 & 2003), Antonio Brown became the 3rd (2014 & 2015)).
  • First player to have 50+ receptions in his first 11 seasons in NFL history. (Torry Holt became the 2nd on December 27, 2009)
  • Most consecutive seasons of 1,000+ all-purpose yards and 10+ touchdown receptions (8), 1999–2006
  • On December 18, 2006, Marvin Harrison and Indianapolis Colt teammate Reggie Wayne became the only NFL wide receiver tandem to catch 75 receptions and 1,000 yards in 3 straight seasons. The game was on Monday Night and was played against the Cincinnati Bengals.
  • On November 17, 2002, made his 600th career reception against the Dallas Cowboys
  • On October 12, 2003, made his 700th career reception against the Carolina Panthers. And is the fastest player to do so reaching the mark in 114 games
  • On November 8, 2004, made his 800th career reception against the Minnesota Vikings. And is the fastest player to do so reaching the mark in 131 games
  • On November 20, 2005, made his 900th career reception against the Cincinnati Bengals. And is the fastest player to do so reaching the mark in 149 career games
  • On December 10, 2006, made his 1000th reception against the Jacksonville Jaguars. And is the fastest player to do so reaching the mark in 167 career games
  • On December 28, 2008, made his 1,100th career reception against the Tennessee Titans in his last regular season game and his last game in Indianapolis. He is the fastest player to do so reaching the mark in 190 career games.
  • Most receptions over first 7 seasons (665), 8 seasons (759), 9 seasons (845), 10 seasons (927), 11 seasons (1,022) and 13 seasons (1,102) of career of any NFL receiver
  • Most consecutive games with a reception to start a career (190)
  • Most average receptions per game in a career (5.8) – 1996–2008
  • Most consecutive games with 8+ receiving yards (190), (206 if counting playoffs) – every game
  • Most consecutive games with a 6+ yard reception (190), (206 if counting playoffs) – every game
  • Most consecutive games with an 8+ yard reception (177), (192 if counting playoffs)

Personal life

Harrison was sued in a civil lawsuit by Dwight Dixon, a convicted drug dealer, after both were shot outside Chuckie's Garage, a North Philadelphia business owned by Harrison, on April 29, 2008.[9][10] The two men had been in a fight minutes prior to the shooting over an issue that happened a few weeks earlier, when Dixon and Harrison got into a verbal argument when Harrison denied Dixon entry into Playmakers, a sports bar owned and operated by Harrison. Dixon alleged that Harrison was the gunman who shot at him. On January 6, 2009, Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham confirmed that the gun used was the same model as Harrison's gun that fired shots at Dixon but they had been unable to determine who pulled the trigger.[11]

The Philadelphia District Attorney also stated that she was not going to pursue charges in this case due to conflicting witness statements. In fact, within a week of the first shooting, Marvin Harrison was not considered a suspect.[12] Dixon, who had initially given the police a false name and claimed he was robbed by two men when interviewed at the hospital,[13] was subsequently convicted of filing a false report for this incident on January 28, 2009. Dixon was sentenced to 6 months probation. Dixon's attorney reportedly sought a new trial as the conviction violated Dixon's parole in an unrelated case.[14] Harrison is also being sued by Robert Nixon, a victim caught in the crossfire of the shooting who identified Harrison as the shooter in a statement to police.[15]

Dixon died on July 21, 2009, after he was shot several times while in his car outside a building two blocks away from Harrison's sports bar. At the hospital after the shooting, detectives questioned Dixon before surgery and he stated that it stemmed from the Harrison incident a year prior and that Harrison had hired a gun man to shoot him. An informant also made a statement asserting the gunman that killed Dixon was Lonnie Harrison, Marvin Harrison's cousin. On June 16, 2010, Shaun Assael of ESPN The Magazine reported that police confiscated a 9mm handgun from Harrison during a routine traffic stop on Wednesday in Philadelphia. Police will test the gun to see if it matches three spent 9mm shell casings that ended up inside the truck driven by Dwight Dixon at the scene of an April 2008 shooting. Dixon, who eventually was shot and killed after filing a civil lawsuit, claimed that the casings came from a second gun that Harrison fired. Authorities already have matched other bullets to a separate gun that Harrison owns—and that he stated was in his home on the day the shooting occurred. Police found the gun during a search of Harrison's Escalade. The stop occurred as Harrison drove the vehicle the wrong way on a one-way street. Harrison claimed he did not have a gun. But police believed they saw Harrison put what appeared to be a weapon in the console between the two front seats. They concluded that they had probable cause to search the vehicle, and they found the gun.[16] Harrison was not charged.

Another incident occurred in 2014, when Harrison narrowly escaped a Philadelphia shooting.[17]

References

  1. ^ "Start with Rice No. 1, Moss No. 2 in best WR debate - NFL - ESPN". Sports.espn.go.com. March 26, 2008. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  2. ^ "Pro Football Hall of Fame finalists revealed - NFL - ESPN". Sports.espn.go.com. January 9, 2014. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  3. ^ "Marvin Harrison: Official Website of the Indianapolis Colts". Colts.com. Archived from the original on May 18, 2008.
  4. ^ "Indianapolis Colts end 13-year relationship, release wide receiver Marvin Harrison - ESPN". Sports.espn.go.com. February 24, 2009. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  5. ^ MJD. "Peter King Twitters that Marvin Harrison is done - Shutdown Corner - NFL Blog - Yahoo! Sports". Sports.yahoo.com. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  6. ^ "This site will soon be up and running". Indiana.sbnation.com. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  7. ^ Legwold, Jeff (February 7, 2016). "Brett Favre, Ken Stabler, Marvin Harrison among Hall's 2016 class". ESPN. Retrieved February 7, 2016.
  8. ^ Holder, Stephen (February 7, 2016). "Marvin Harrison's work ethic rewarded". Indianapolis Star. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  9. ^ [1] Archived January 15, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ "Civil Docket". Fjdefile.phila.gov. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 19, 2011. Retrieved January 14, 2017.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  12. ^ Alesia, Mark. "Police: 'Harrison not suspect at this point'". Indianapolis Star. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  13. ^ "Man shot by Indianapolis Colts receiver Marvin Harrison's gun set for trial". ESPN. January 27, 2009. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  14. ^ [2] Archived February 10, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  15. ^ "Second man claims ex-Indianapolis Colts WR Marvin Harrison shot him". ESPN. July 27, 2009. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  16. ^ "Sources: FBI joins probe of Marvin Harrison gun case". ESPN. January 15, 2010. Retrieved August 17, 2014.
  17. ^ "Marvin Harrison Narrowly Avoids Gunfire in Philadelphia". philly.com. Retrieved December 17, 2014.

External links

1995 All-Big East Conference football team

The 1995 All-Big East Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors for their All-Big East Conference ("Big East") teams for the 1995 NCAA Division I-A football season. Selectors in 1995 included the Football News (FN).

Six teams placed more than two players on the first team as follows:

Despite finishing in last place in the conference, Pittsburgh (0–7 record in conference play) led the conference with four players on the All-Big East first team. The Pitt honorees were: wide receiver Dietrich Jells, linebacker Tom Tumulty, placekicker Chris Ferencik, and punter Nate Cochran.

Conference champion Virginia Tech was ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll and placed three players on the first team: offensive lineman Bill Conaty and defensive linemen Cornell Brown and J. C. Price.

Syracuse was ranked No. 19 in the final AP Poll and also placed three players on the first team: quarterback Donovan McNabb, wide receiver Marvin Harrison, and defensive back Kevin Abrams.

Miami was ranked No. 20 in the final AP Poll and placed three players on the first team: running back Danyell Ferguson, defensive lineman Kenny Holmes, and linebacker Ray Lewis.

Fourth-place West Virginia also placed three on the first team: linebacker Canute Curtis and defensive backs Torrian Gray and William Yarborough.

Sixth-place Rugers also placed three on the first team: running back Terrell Willis, tight end Marco Battaglia, and offensive lineman Pat Cormann.

1996 Gator Bowl

The 1996 Gator Bowl was a college football postseason bowl game between the Syracuse Orangemen and the Clemson Tigers.

1996 Indianapolis Colts season

The 1996 Indianapolis Colts season was the 44th season for the team in the National Football League and 13th in Indianapolis. The Indianapolis Colts finished the National Football League's 1996 season with a record of 9 wins and 7 losses, and finished third in the AFC East division.

On October 13, the Colts hosted the newly established Baltimore Ravens, based in the Colts' previous city. The Colts won 26–21. This game has the distinction of being the first NFL on TNT broadcast after TNT's parent Turner Broadcasting System completed its merger with Time Warner only 3 days earlier.

The season saw the Colts draft Marvin Harrison. Harrison would go on to become a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, after spending his entire career as a Colt. Harrison was named to Pro Bowl several times and later helped the Colts win a Super Bowl in 2006. He continued to play for the team until 2008 and retired during the 2009 season.

1996 NFL Draft

The 1996 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 20–21, 1996, at the Paramount Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York. No teams chose to claim any players in the supplemental draft that year.

This draft is considered one of the best draft classes ever for the position of wide receiver. Keyshawn Johnson, Terry Glenn, Eddie Kennison, Marvin Harrison, Eric Moulds, Bobby Engram, Terrell Owens, Muhsin Muhammad, Amani Toomer, Jermaine Lewis, and Joe Horn have all achieved success in the pros, with all except Kennison, Engram, and Toomer having reached the Pro Bowl at least once, and a total of 26 Pro Bowl appearances for the group. In addition to the class having had several successful receivers, none of the five wide receivers drafted in the first round have been busts, as all of them spent at least a reasonable amount of time as starters in the NFL. Combined, 1996 wide receivers (through the end of the 2006 season) have totalled 7,646 receptions for 105,866 yards, eclipsing any other class by more than 1,000 receptions and 10,000 yards.It was also one of the best draft years for middle linebackers, with Hall of Famer Ray Lewis and Hall candidate Zach Thomas selected. Lewis won Super Bowl XXXV and was selected MVP of that game. Lewis also won Super Bowl XLVII in the final game of his career, and made 13 career Pro Bowls while Thomas has made 7. Other linebackers who made at least one Pro Bowl from this draft are Tedy Bruschi, Kevin Hardy, Simeon Rice, John Mobley, and Donnie Edwards. Randall Godfrey, Earl Holmes, and Carlos Emmons also had solid careers in the league.

In contrast to its successes at wide receiver and linebacker, the 1996 draft had often been rated as the worst ever for quarterbacks. None of the eight drafted quarterbacks made the Pro Bowl or an All-Pro team. Half of the drafted quarterbacks never threw one pass in the NFL. As of 2018, this remains the last draft without a quarterback selected in the first round. Previously, the 1988 draft had been the last with no quarterback selected in the first round.On draft day, the St. Louis Rams traded running back Jerome Bettis and a third round draft pick to the Pittsburgh Steelers in exchange for a second round pick for that year, as well as a fourth round pick the following year. The trade was made immediately after the Rams drafted Nebraska running back Lawrence Phillips. Bettis went on to have a successful career with the Steelers as well as being one of the team's most popular players, while the Rams wouldn't have another feature back until they traded for Marshall Faulk three years later due to Phillips' off-field problems.

1999 Indianapolis Colts season

The 1999 Indianapolis Colts season was the 47th season for the team in the National Football League and 16th in Indianapolis. The Indianapolis Colts finished the National Football League's 1999 season with a record of 13 wins and 3 losses, and won the AFC East division. This season marked a turning point for the Colts franchise, who had only made the playoffs 3 times since 1977. Since 1999, the Colts have been one of the most successful NFL franchises, only missing the playoffs 5 times in the past 19 years. No other turnaround was as great as the 1999 Colts until the 2008 Miami Dolphins, whom have went from a 1-15 record to an 11-5 record and an AFC East title.

Despite completing a great turnaround from 3-13 to 13-3, the Colts would go on to lose to the eventual AFC Champion Tennessee Titans in the Divisional Round of the playoffs.

2000 All-Pro Team

The 2000 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2000. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2000 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 2000 the AP did not have a separate “Fullback” position.

2000 Indianapolis Colts season

The 2000 Indianapolis Colts season was the 48th season for the team in the National Football League and 17th in Indianapolis. The Indianapolis Colts finished the National Football League's 2000 season with a record of 10 wins and 6 losses, and finished second in the AFC East division. However, their 2000 season was over as they lost in overtime to their division rival Miami Dolphins in the Wildcard round.

Much like last season, the Colts once again sent Peyton Manning, Edgerrin James and Marvin Harrison to the Pro Bowl at the end of the season.

2003 All-Pro Team

The 2003 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2003. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2003 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

2003 Indianapolis Colts season

The 2003 Indianapolis Colts season was the 51st season for the team in the National Football League and 20th in Indianapolis. The Colts improved on their 10-6 record from 2002, going 12-4 and reached the postseason for the second straight season. After the season, quarterback Peyton Manning was named league MVP along with Steve McNair of Tennessee.

After defeating the Broncos and the Chiefs in the first two rounds, the Colts lost to the New England Patriots in the title game, which saw the first playoff meeting between Tom Brady and Peyton Manning. New England would go on to defeat the Carolina Panthers in Super Bowl XXXVIII. It was the final season seeing the Colts wear their blue facemasks and white shoes.

2004 All-Pro Team

The 2004 All-Pro Team was composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2004. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2004, the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-Pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 2004, the AP reinstated the “Fullback” position.

2004 Pro Bowl

The 2004 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 2003 season. The game was played on February 8, 2004, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 55, AFC 52, the most points scored in a Pro Bowl game. Marc Bulger of the St. Louis Rams was the game's MVP.

2005 Indianapolis Colts season

The 2005 Indianapolis Colts season was the franchise’s 53rd season in the National Football League and 22nd in Indianapolis. The 2005 Colts improved on their 12–4 record from 2004 and finished the season 14–2, but ended in a devastating loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers who eventually went on to win the Super Bowl.

Indianapolis started the season with a 13-game winning streak and were heavily favored to go to the Super Bowl. The Colts’ nemesis, the New England Patriots, lost to the Denver Broncos in the Divisional round of the playoffs. The following night the Colts were favored over the Steelers because they had easily beaten them in their previous meeting. However, the Colts were disappointed by the sixth-seeded Steelers’ upset win.

The 2005 Colts set an NFL record by winning twelve games in which they never trailed at any point in the contest.The 2005 Colts were the first team opening with 13 wins to lose a playoff game, although this would be repeated by themselves again in the 2009 season, the 2011 Green Bay Packers who started 13–0 and went 15–1, and by the 2015 Carolina Panthers.

2005 Pro Bowl

The 2005 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 2004 season. The game was played February 13, 2005, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was AFC 38 – NFC 27. The most valuable player was Peyton Manning of the Colts. The game holds the record as the latest Pro Bowl played during the calendar year, and the latest NFL game.

2006 Indianapolis Colts season

The 2006 Indianapolis Colts season was the franchise's 54th season in the National Football League and 23rd in Indianapolis. The season began with the team trying to maintain or improve on their regular season record of 14–2 from the 2005 season, and advance further into the playoffs. The Colts failed to improve on their 14-2 record, finishing 12-4. However, they did improve upon their postseason performance, winning Super Bowl XLI.

For the fourth consecutive season, the Colts had won 12 or more games. They also won the AFC South Division Championship for the fourth time in a row, and they won the American Football Conference Championship, beating the New England Patriots 38–34 to advance to Super Bowl XLI, in which they dominated the Chicago Bears, winning 29–17 on February 4, 2007, at Dolphin Stadium. This was the franchise's first Super Bowl since Super Bowl V in 1970, and first since relocating to Indianapolis. It was their fourth world championship (1958, 1959, 1970, and 2006.)

The 2006 Colts surrendered 5.33 rushing yards per attempt, by far the worst since the merger, and seventh-worst in NFL history. Still, the Colts won the championship with the help of the most statistically efficient offense in the league.

Indianapolis Colts Ring of Honor

The Indianapolis Colts Ring of Honor honors former players, coaches, club officials, and fans who made outstanding contributions to the Indianapolis Colts football organization.

Originally a ring around the former RCA Dome in Indianapolis, Indiana, it currently encircles Lucas Oil Stadium.

The Ring of Honor began on September 23, 1996, with the induction of then owner, Robert Irsay. Since then, ten players (all offensive), two head coaches, a general manager, and an honor to the fans have been added. Tony Dungy was the first to be added to the ring of honor in Lucas Oil Stadium.

The 12th Man addition to the ring was the last to be added in the RCA Dome. While the ring membership is not increased annually, there was at least one inductee added every year from 2010 to 2013.

List of National Football League annual receptions leaders

This is a list of National Football League players who have led the regular season in receptions each year.

Rob Carpenter (wide receiver)

Rob Carpenter (born August 1, 1968, in Amityville, New York) is a retired American football wide receiver who played for the New England Patriots, New York Jets and Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League. In college, he played for the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish and Syracuse University Orangemen and was drafted by the Cincinnati Bengals in the fourth round of the 1991 NFL Draft. He was one of a relatively small class of underclassmen, headlined by Ragib "Rocket" Ismail, to be approved in the NFL's second class of players allowed to declare themselves eligible for the draft despite remaining amateur eligibility. In addition to Carpenter, other headliners among the underclassmen were Herman Moore, Todd Marinovich and Jon Vaughn (who also played for the 1991 Patriots).The 1995 Eagles, coached by Ray Rhodes, were the only playoff team that he played for. They compiled a 10-6 record and won their 1995 Wild Card Game against the Detroit Lions before losing to the eventual Super Bowl XXX champion Dallas Cowboys. Carpenter was third (Fred Barnett & Calvin Williams) in receptions and yardage among wide receivers for the Eagles. He and Williams were the only receivers to play all 16 regular season games for the Eagles that year. He and Kelvin Martin shared the punt return duties for the 1995 Eagles. He had two receptions in each playoff game (including a touchdown in the first).He ranks among the all-time leaders in Syracuse University receptions in most statistics despite only playing for them for two seasons. He ranks fifth in career yards (1656), ninth in touchdowns (10), ninth in receptions (93), seventh in yards/catch (17.8) and second in yards/game (72.0). The only others in the top 10 on all five of these lists are Marvin Harrison, Rob Moore and Mike Siano.

Syracuse Orange football

The Syracuse Orange, known traditionally as the "Syracuse Orangemen", represent Syracuse University in the sport of American football. The Orange compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

Formed in 1889, the program has over 700 wins and has achieved 1 consensus Division I Football National Championship, winning the championship game over the Texas Longhorns in the 1960 Cotton Bowl Classic, for the 1959 season. Syracuse has had 2 undefeated seasons, 5 conference championships since 1991, and has produced a Heisman Trophy winner, over 60 first team All-Americans, 18 Academic All-Americans including Academic All-America Hall of Fame inductee Tim Green, and over 240 NFL players. Syracuse has had 18 members inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, 2nd-most in the ACC, including former players Ernie Davis, Tim Green, Don McPherson, Art Monk and former coaches Vic Hanson, Ben Schwartzwalder, and Dick MacPherson. The Orange boast 8 inductees in the Pro Football Hall Of Fame, tied for the 4th-most of any school, including Jim Brown, Marvin Harrison, Larry Csonka, and Floyd Little.The Orange have 26 bowl appearances, 10 of which are among the New Year's Six Bowls. Syracuse has finished in the Final Top 25 rankings 21 times in the national polls, and finished in either the AP or Coaches Polls a combined 35 times since 1952. Syracuse has appeared in over 200 AP Polls including 7 weeks at AP number one.

The Orange play their home games in Carrier Dome on the university's campus. The stadium is also known as "The Loud House", as when it opened in September 1980, it was made clear just how loud it was inside; and so the soon famous nickname was coined.

Syracuse Orange football statistical leaders

The Syracuse Orange football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Syracuse Orange football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Orange represent Syracuse University in the NCAA's Atlantic Coast Conference.

Although Syracuse began competing in intercollegiate football in 1889, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1946. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1946, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Orange have played in five bowl games since then, giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Marvin Harrison—awards, championships, and honors

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.