Marv Levy

Marvin Daniel Levy (born August 3, 1925) is a former American and Canadian football coach, front office executive, and author. He served as head coach in the Canadian Football League (CFL) for the Montreal Alouettes (1973–1977) and in the National Football League (NFL) for the Kansas City Chiefs (1978–1982) and the Buffalo Bills (1986–1997), coaching the Bills to four consecutive American Football Conference championships. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2001.

Marv Levy
Personal information
Born:August 3, 1925 (age 93)
Chicago, Illinois
Career information
High school:Chicago (IL) South Shore
College:Coe College
Career history
As coach:
As administrator:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Win-Loss Record:143–112
Winning %:.561
Games:255
Coaching stats at PFR
Marv Levy
Allegiance United States
Service/branchU.S. Army Air Forces seal U.S. Army Air Forces
Years of service1943–1946
Battles/warsWorld War II

Early life

Levy's family emigrated from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. His father, a decorated World War I veteran, ran a small business on the South Side of Chicago. He graduated from South Shore High School in Chicago in 1943. Following graduation, he enlisted in the Army Air Forces and spent the remainder of World War II in the military; Levy was discharged from the army shortly after the war ended.

Though he was known to use historical examples to inspire his teams, Levy corrected those who used war and combat metaphors to describe football games by telling them that he actually fought in a war and that football and war were in no way comparable.[1] Referring to the Super Bowl, he said "This is not a must-win; World War II was a must-win".[2] Steve Tasker, who played for Levy on the Bills, said[3]

Marv always a knack for always finding the right thing to say. He wasn't a believer in Knute Rockne, 'Win one for the Gipper' speeches. He didn't like ripping us. But what he said had an effect on us, one way or another. It either got us mad at our opponents or mad at ourselves. Marv was a master psychologist at knowing what buttons to push.

College years

Levy enrolled at Coe College in Iowa. There he earned varsity letters in football, track, and basketball. He obtained a degree in English literature, was granted membership in the Phi Beta Kappa Society, and was twice voted student council president. He was also a member of the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity. He was admitted to Harvard University for graduate studies in 1951, earning a master's degree in English history.

College coaching

Levy's first coaching job was at St. Louis Country Day School, coaching football and basketball, the latter in which he coached to a championship.[4] Two years later, Levy returned to Coe College as an assistant football coach (1953–1954) and in his second stint as a head coach, he also won a championship—this time in basketball with future NBA Coach Bill Fitch as one of his players.[4] In 1954, he joined the coaching staff at the University of New Mexico and was named head coach in 1958. In two seasons as head coach, he guided the Lobos to a 14–6 record and earned Skyline Conference Coach of the Year honors both years. He interviewed with the University of California, Berkeley on February 2, 1960, and was announced as the new head coach of the Cal Bears on February 5, 1960. Despite selecting a young Bill Walsh as a coaching assistant, Levy's best record during his four-season tenure as head coach at Cal from 1960 to 1963 was 4–5–1. He finished his college coaching career with a five-year stint as head coach at the College of William & Mary where he twice earned Southern Conference Coach of the Year honors.

Professional football

Levy began his professional football coaching career in 1969 as kicking teams coach for the Philadelphia Eagles before joining George Allen's staff as a special teams coach for the Los Angeles Rams in 1970. He followed Allen to Washington, D.C. in 1971, where he served as the Washington Redskins' special teams coach for two seasons. Levy then served as the head coach of the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League for five seasons. He coached Montreal to three CFL Grey Cup appearances and two championships, and won the Annis Stukus Trophy (Coach of the Year) in 1974. Levy returned to the NFL in 1978 as head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs. He coached the Chiefs for five seasons with steady improvement each year, but was fired at the end of the strike-shortened 1982 season with a 3–6 record.

Midway through the 1986 season, following a two-year hiatus from coaching and one season as the head coach of the Chicago Blitz of the USFL, Levy returned to the NFL as head coach of the Buffalo Bills. He finished the season with a 2–5 record. In 1987, his first full season with the Bills, the team returned to respectability with a 7–8 record and were in the playoff hunt throughout most of the season. The following season the team posted a 12–4 record and won the first of six AFC Eastern Division titles. With his high-powered "no-huddle" offense, Levy's Bills went on to lead his AFC championship team to four consecutive Super Bowl appearances.

From 1988 through 1997, the Bills were first in the AFC in winning percentage and second only to the San Francisco 49ers in the NFL. Levy, the winningest coach in Bills' history, recorded a 112–70 regular season record and was 11–8 in the playoffs during his eleven seasons with the Bills. He was named NFL Coach of the Year in 1988 and AFC Coach of the Year in 1988, 1993, and 1995.

Coaching tree

Levy's coaching tree is among the largest of any NFL head coach; however, this is largely due to the fact that he once had Bill Walsh as an assistant and most of Walsh's assistants never worked under Levy. Among notable non-Walsh coaches are Wade Phillips, who succeeded Levy as the Bills' head coach and also served as head coach of the Denver Broncos and Dallas Cowboys (along with interim coaching stints for the New Orleans Saints, Atlanta Falcons, and Houston Texans), as well as former Baltimore Ravens and Baltimore/Indianapolis Colts coach Ted Marchibroda, and former New York Sentinels head coach Ted Cottrell.

Outspoken pundit Chuck Dickerson worked under Levy for several years in Buffalo before being fired.

First retirement

Levy retired in 1997 and became an analyst for NFL.com. In 2001 Levy was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. Along with former Bills' special-teamer Steve Tasker, Levy did local broadcasts for the Bills' pre-season games until being appointed the Bills' general manager in 2006. During the regular season he was a part of the Chicago Bears pregame show on ESPN Radio 1000 (WMVP-AM), as well as a Bears postgame show on Comcast SportsNet.

General manager

On January 5, 2006, Bills owner Ralph Wilson enlisted Levy, at the age of 80, to act as General Manager and Vice President of Football Operations for the Buffalo Bills. Following the resignation of Mike Mularkey, there was initial speculation (created by Levy's own comments at a team press conference) that Levy would resume a coaching role with the team. To eliminate this speculation, and to minimize any future tension between Levy and the Bills' new head coach, team owner Wilson said: "To say it very, very succinctly, Marv Levy is our general manager. He will never be the coach."

Levy's first order of business was to hire a new coach as a replacement for Mularkey, who resigned within days of Levy's appointment. After a strenuous interview process Levy and team owner Wilson hired Detroit Lions interim head coach Dick Jauron as coach. Jauron had been head coach of the Chicago Bears.

Second retirement

Following the Bills' last game of the 2007 season, Levy decided to step down as GM of the Bills (his two-year contract had expired). He has returned to live in his native Chicago, although he also spent some time in Montreal mentoring then-Alouettes head coach Marc Trestman.[5] Levy stated he would be open to returning to coaching if asked.[6] He has also admittedly not paid much attention to professional football in the past several years as of 2017.[7]

In 2009, Levy collaborated with Buffalo football historian Jeffrey J. Miller to write a book entitled Game Changers: The Greatest Plays in Buffalo Bills Football History.[8] In August 2011, Levy published a second book, Between the Lies, featuring a team based loosely on the Bills (including a quarterback named "Kelly James") progressing to the Super Bowl against a Los Angeles-based team and its take-no-prisoners head coach, while a scandal erupts, placing the integrity of the game at risk.[9]

A lifelong Chicago Cubs fan, Levy was among a select few people in attendance at both the 1945 World Series (which he attended while on furlough from the Army Air Forces) and the 2016 World Series.[10] Levy's fourth book, the children's book Go Cubs Go, is about the 2016 series.[11]

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
New Mexico Lobos (Skyline Conference) (1958–1959)
1958 New Mexico 7–3 5–1 2nd
1959 New Mexico 7–3 4–2 3rd
New Mexico: 14–6 9–3
California Golden Bears (Athletic Association of Western Universities) (1960–1963)
1960 California 2–7–1 1–3 4th
1961 California 1–8–1 1–3 T–4th
1962 California 1–9 0–4 6th
1963 California 4–5–1 1–3 5th
California: 8–29–3 3–13
William & Mary Indians (Southern Conference) (1964–1968)
1964 William & Mary 4–6 4–3 T–4th
1965 William & Mary 6–4 5–1 2nd
1966 William & Mary 5–4–1 4–1–1 T–1st
1967 William & Mary 5–4–1 2–2–1 4th
1968 William & Mary 3–7 2–3 5th
William & Mary: 23–25–2 17–10–2
Total: 45–60–5
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

Professional

Team Year Regular Season Post Season
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
MTL 1973 7 6 1 .536 3rd in East 1 1 .500 Lost to Ottawa Rough Riders in East Final.
MTL 1974 9 5 2 .625 1st in East 2 0 1.000 Won over Edmonton Eskimos in 62nd Grey Cup.
MTL 1975 9 7 0 .563 2nd in East 2 1 0.667 Lost to Edmonton Eskimos in 63rd Grey Cup.
MTL 1976 7 8 1 .469 3rd in East 0 1 0.000 Lost to Hamilton Tiger-Cats in East Semi-Final.
MTL 1977 11 5 0 .689 1st in East 2 0 1.000 Won over Edmonton Eskimos in 65th Grey Cup.
CFL Total 43 31 4 .577 7 3 .700 Won two Grey Cup Championships.
KC 1978 4 12 0 .250 5th in AFC West
KC 1979 7 9 0 .438 5th in AFC West
KC 1980 8 8 0 .500 3rd in AFC West
KC 1981 9 7 0 .563 3rd in AFC West
KC 1982 3 6 0 .333 4th in AFC West
KC Total 31 42 0 .425
BUF 1986 2 5 0 .286 4th in AFC East
BUF 1987 7 8 0 .467 4th in AFC East
BUF 1988 12 4 0 .750 1st in AFC East 1 1 .500 Lost to Cincinnati Bengals in AFC Championship.
BUF 1989 9 7 0 .563 1st in AFC East 0 1 .000 Lost to Cleveland Browns in Divisional Game.
BUF 1990 13 3 0 .813 1st in AFC East 2 1 .667 Lost to New York Giants in Super Bowl XXV.
BUF 1991 13 3 0 .813 1st in AFC East 2 1 .667 Lost to Washington Redskins in Super Bowl XXVI.
BUF 1992 11 5 0 .688 2nd in AFC East 3 1 .750 Lost to Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl XXVII.
BUF 1993 12 4 0 .750 1st in AFC East 2 1 .667 Lost to Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl XXVIII.
BUF 1994 7 9 0 .438 4th in AFC East
BUF 1995 10 6 0 .625 1st in AFC East 1 1 .500 Lost to Pittsburgh Steelers in Divisional Game.
BUF 1996 10 6 0 .625 2nd in AFC East 0 1 .000 Lost to Jacksonville Jaguars in Wild Card Game.
BUF 1997 6 10 0 .375 4th in AFC East
BUF Total 112 70 0 .615 11 8 .579
NFL Total[12] 143 112 0 .561 11 8 .579
Total 186 143 4 .565 18 11 .621

Career highlights

  • Won two of three CFL championships in five seasons while head coach of the Montreal Alouettes
  • Guided the Bills to six division championships (including four consecutive from 1988–1991)
  • Compiled a 17–6 record (14–6 in the regular season and 3–0 in the post-season) against the winningest coach in NFL history, Don Shula. He is the only coach to have a winning record against Shula, other than Tom Flores of the Raiders, who went 6–1 against Don Shula.
  • Compiled 209 CFL-NFL-USFL coaching victories (T12th in Pro Football History)
  • One of only 15 coaches to win 100 games with one NFL team
  • The only coach to compete in four Super Bowls in a row
  • Retired at the age of 72; tied with George Halas as the oldest head coach in NFL history.
  • First USFL alumnus to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame
  • One of only two coaches to appear in both a Grey Cup Championship Game and the Super Bowl. The other is Bud Grant.
  • Oldest coach ever to win 12 games (age 68) and 10 games (age 71) [13]

See also

Bibliography

  • Marv Levy: Where Else Would You Rather Be?, Sports Publishing, 2004. ISBN 1-58261-797-X
  • Game Changers: The Greatest Plays in Buffalo Bills History (with Jeffrey Miller), Triumph Books, 2009. ISBN 1-60078-275-2
  • Between the Lies (fiction), Ascend Books, 2011. ISBN 0-9830619-3-9
  • Go Cubs Go! Baseball's Never Give Up Story (children's, with George Castle, illustrated by Rob Peters), Ascend Books 2017. ISBN 978-0996674270

References

  1. ^ Jonah Goldberg (July 11, 2006). "Sports Cont'd – The Corner". National Review. Retrieved October 15, 2012.
  2. ^ LA Times article on Veteran Athletes
  3. ^ Tasker, Steve; Pitoniak, Scott (2013). "4: It Ain't Over Till It's Over". The Buffalo Bills: My Life on a Special Team. Sports Publishing. ISBN 978-1-61321-328-5.
  4. ^ a b Schoffner, Chuck (July 14, 2012). "Marv Levy named to Des Moines Sunday Register's Iowa Sports Hall of Fame". DesMoinesRegister.com.
  5. ^ Legendary coach Levy visits Alouettes training camp. Canadian Press via TSN. June 11, 2008.
  6. ^ Marv Levy would be interested in Buffalo Bills job. BuffaloRumblings.com. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  7. ^ Maiorana, Sal (February 19, 2017). Marv Levy pens children's book to celebrate Cubs championship. Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. Retrieved February 19, 2017.
  8. ^ "Game Changers: The Greatest Plays in Buffalo Bills Football History: Marv Levy,Jeffrey J. Miller: 9781600782756: Amazon.com: Books". Amazon.com. Retrieved October 15, 2012.
  9. ^ Between the Lies. "Between the Lies: Marv Levy: 9780983061939: Amazon.com: Books". Amazon.com. Retrieved October 15, 2012.
  10. ^ Marv Levy to be honored at World Series. Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved October 28, 2016.
  11. ^ Mawicke, Megan (January 19, 2017). Marv Levy Pens Children’s Book About Cubs’ World Series Win. WBBM. Retrieved January 19, 2017.
  12. ^ Marv Levy Record, Statistics, and Category Ranks – Pro-Football-Reference.com
  13. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/coaches/LevyMa0.htm

External links

1957 New Mexico Lobos football team

The 1957 New Mexico Lobos football team represented the University of New Mexico in the Skyline Conference during the 1957 college football season. In their second and final season under head coach Dick Clausen, the Lobos compiled a 4–6 record (2–4 against Skyline opponents), finished fifth in the conference, and were outscored by opponents by a total of 144 to 140. The Lobos won four of five games to open the season, but closed the season with five consecutive losses.The team's statistical leaders included Chuck Roberts with 305 passing yards and Don Perkins with 744 rushing yards and 162 receiving yards.In May 1958, Dick Clausen retired as New Mexico's head football coach to become the athletic director at the University of Arizona. Clausen was immediately replaced by Marv Levy.

1958 New Mexico Lobos football team

The 1958 New Mexico Lobos football team represented the University of New Mexico in the Skyline Conference during the 1958 NCAA University Division football season. In their first season under head coach Marv Levy, the Lobos compiled a 7–3 record (5–1 against Skyline opponents), finished second in the conference, and outscored all opponents by a total of 210 to 185.The team's statistical leaders included Chuck Roberts with 337 passing yards, Don Perkins with 621 rushing yards, and Don Black with 303 receiving yards and 54 points scored. Perkins went on to play eight seasons for the Dallas Cowboys and played in six Pro Bowls.

1959 New Mexico Lobos football team

The 1959 New Mexico Lobos football team represented the University of New Mexico in the Skyline Conference during the 1959 college football season. In their second and final season under head coach Marv Levy, the Lobos compiled a 7–3 record (4–2 against Skyline opponents), finished third in the conference, and outscored all opponents by a total of 260 to 135.The team's statistical leaders included George Friberg with 361 passing yards and Don Perkins with 636 rushing yards, 226 receiving yards and 66 points scored. Perkins went on to play eight seasons for the Dallas Cowboys and played in six Pro Bowls.In February 1960, New Mexico head coach Marv Levy was hired as the head football coach at the University of California. Levy compiled a 14–6 record in two seasons at New Mexico.

1960 California Golden Bears football team

The 1960 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Athletic Association of Western Universities (AAWU) during the 1960 college football season. In its first year under head coach Marv Levy, the team compiled a 2–7–1 record (1–3 against AAWU opponents), finished in fourth place in the AAWU, and was outscored by its opponents by a combined total of 195 to 93.The team's statistical leaders included Randy Gold with 696 passing yards, Steve Bates with 384 rushing yards, and Dave George with 128 receiving yards. Cal center Dick Carlson received recognition from the Associated Press (AP) as a second-team player on the 1960 All-Pacific Coast football team.

1961 California Golden Bears football team

The 1961 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Athletic Association of Western Universities (AAWU) during the 1961 college football season. In its second year under head coach Marv Levy, the team compiled a 1–8–1 record (1–3 against AAWU opponents), finished in last place in the AAWU, and was outscored by its opponents by a combined total of 268 to 118.The team's statistical leaders included Randy Gold with 403 passing yards, Alan Nelson with 331 rushing yards, and Bob Wills with 302 receiving yards.

1962 California Golden Bears football team

The 1962 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Athletic Association of Western Universities (AAWU) during the 1962 college football season. In its fourth year under head coach Marv Levy, the team compiled a 1–9 record (0–4 against AAWU opponents), finished in last place in the AAWU, and was outscored by its opponents by a combined total of 247 to 143.The team's statistical leaders included Craig Morton with 905 passing yards, Alan Nelson with 334 rushing yards, and Bill Turner with 537 receiving yards. Morton was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

1963 California Golden Bears football team

The 1963 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley in the Athletic Association of Western Universities (AAWU) during the 1963 college football season. In its fourth year under head coach Marv Levy, the team compiled a 4–5–1 record (1–3 against AAWU opponents), finished in fifth place in the AAWU, and was outscored by its opponents by a combined total of 213 to 195.The team's statistical leaders included Craig Morton with 1,475 passing yards, Tom Blanchfield with 387 rushing yards, and Jack Schraub with 467 receiving yards. Morton was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

1989 Pro Bowl

The 1989 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 39th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1988 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 29, 1989, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,113. The final score was NFC 34, AFC 3.Marv Levy of the Buffalo Bills led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Chicago Bears head coach Mike Ditka. The referee was Ben Dreith.Randall Cunningham of the Philadelphia Eagles was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.It was the last Pro Bowl game played in January for two decades, until the 2010 Pro Bowl.

Carey Bender

Carey Wayne Bender (born January 28, 1972 in Marion, Iowa) is a former professional American football running back in the National Football League. He attended Coe College, where he still holds numerous rushing records. He was given an opportunity to play in the NFL by Buffalo Bills head coach Marv Levy, a fellow Coe College graduate. He played with the Buffalo Bills in 1996 as a member of the team's practice squad. After playing well in the NFL pre-season, he appeared in one game of the regular season, but recorded no carries.

Bender is one of two Coe College running backs to have played in the NFL. The other is Fred Jackson, former starting running back for the Buffalo Bills. Jackson was also given this opportunity by Marv Levy, who was the Bills general manager at the time. Bender and Jackson are among a select few American football players to have played in the NFL after playing at a Division III college.

Dan Henning

Daniel Ernest Henning, (born June 21, 1942) is a former American football player and coach. A quarterback, he played college football at the College of William & Mary and professional football in 1966 for the San Diego Chargers of the American Football League (AFL). Henning served as a head coach in the National Football League (NFL) for the Atlanta Falcons (1983–1986) and the Chargers (1989–1991). He was the head football coach at Boston College from 1994 to 1996. Henning then returned to the NFL as an offensive coordinator for the Buffalo Bills in 1997. After Hall of Fame coach Marv Levy retired, reportedly partially due to his reluctance to fire Henning, Henning left Buffalo.

Four Falls of Buffalo

Four Falls of Buffalo is a 2015 documentary film produced for ESPN's 30 for 30 series and directed by Ken Rodgers of NFL Films. The film profiles the Buffalo Bills teams of the early 1990s, when the franchise became the first team to play in — and lose — four consecutive Super Bowls.The film goes through the Bills four "Super Bowl" years featuring retrospectives and insight on such famous plays as Scott Norwood's 47-yard field goal miss at the end of Super Bowl XXV, Thurman Thomas' misplaced helmet at the start of Super Bowl XXVI, and Don Beebe's strip of Leon Lett's attempted fumble return in Super Bowl XXVII. Former Bills players Jim Kelly, Bruce Smith, Thurman Thomas, Andre Reed, Don Beebe, Darryl Talley, Steve Tasker, Frank Reich, coach Marv Levy, and general manager Bill Polian all gave extensive interviews for the film.A highlight of the documentary is an emotional interview with Norwood and former Bills special teams coach Bruce DeHaven conducted on the steps of Buffalo City Hall, the site where, twenty-five years before, the crowd of Bills fans had cheered for Norwood following his ill-fated kick.

Jimmye Laycock Football Center

The Jimmye Laycock Football Center (JLFC) is a football facility for The College of William & Mary Tribe in Williamsburg, Virginia, USA. The $11 million, 30,000-square-foot (2,800 m2) building was constructed right next to Zable Stadium where the Tribe play all home games. The facility is named after William & Mary's current, and most successful, football coach Jimmye Laycock, and the cost of the project was funded entirely through private donations.

The JLFC was dedicated on June 21, 2008, and among those in attendance were former William & Mary wide receiver and present Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin (Class of 1994), former Buffalo Bills head coach Marv Levy, current Virginia Tech Hokies football head coach Frank Beamer, and former William & Mary athletic director (1981-85) Jim Copeland.

List of Buffalo Bills head coaches

The Buffalo Bills are a professional American football team based in the Buffalo, New York metropolitan area. They are members of the Eastern Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The Bills franchise was formed in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL), before joining the NFL as part of the AFL-NFL merger of 1970.There have been 19 head coaches for the Bills franchise. Buster Ramsey became the first head coach of the Buffalo Bills in 1960, serving for two seasons before being fired by Bills owner Ralph Wilson after the 1961 season. In terms of tenure, Marv Levy has coached more games (182) and seasons (12) than any other coach in franchise history. He coached the Bills to four straight AFC Championships from 1990–1993, but failed to lead the team to a victory in the Super Bowl. One of Levy's predecessors, Lou Saban, who coached the team on two separate occasions, led the team to the victories in the AFL championship in 1964 and 1965. Three Bills coaches—Saban, Levy and Chuck Knox—have been named coach of the year by at least one major news organization. Levy and Jim Ringo are the only Bills coaches to have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

There have been six "interim" head coaches in Bills history. First, in 1968, head coach Joe Collier was fired two games into the season and replaced by Bills personnel director Harvey Johnson. Johnson did not serve as head coach the following season. Then, five games into the 1976 season, Saban unexpectedly resigned as head coach. He was replaced by Ringo, the team's offensive line coach. Ringo returned to coach the team again in the 1977 season. In October 1985, Kay Stephenson was fired and replaced by assistant head coach Hank Bullough. Just over a year later, Bullough was himself fired and replaced by Marv Levy, who had previously served as coach of the Kansas City Chiefs. Levy would then serve as Bills head coach for the next 12 seasons. In 2016, Anthony Lynn replaced Rex Ryan for the final game of the season.

Following Levy's retirement, the Bills experienced limited success under a series of successive head coaches. Wade Phillips, the Bills defensive coordinator for the last three years under Levy, took over head coaching duties for the 1998 season. Phillips served as head coach for three seasons, making the playoffs in his first two (He was the last coach to lead the Bills to the playoffs until Sean McDermott became coach in 2017). After Phillips' departure following the 2000 season, Gregg Williams was named head coach. Williams served as coach for three seasons. At the end of the 2003 season, Williams' contract was not renewed. Mike Mularkey was named as the new head coach for the 2004 season, leading the Bills to their first winning season since 1999. The Bills experienced less success under Mularkey during 2005, and Mularkey resigned as head coach at the completion of the 2005 season. The Bills then named Dick Jauron as their head coach for the 2006 season. Jauron was the first coach since Phillips' dismissal with prior head coaching experience, having previously served as head coach of the Chicago Bears and interim head coach of the Detroit Lions. Jauron coached the Bills to three consecutive 7–9 seasons before being fired on November 17, 2009, nine games into the 2009 season. On January 19, 2010, the Bills named Chan Gailey as their next head coach; Gailey was fired on December 31, 2012. In January 2013, Doug Marrone was appointed. He exercised his option to leave in January 2015 following the change of ownership to Kim and Terrence Pegula and was replaced by Rex Ryan. Rex Ryan was fired from the team on December 27, 2016. Anthony Lynn served as interim head coach until January 11, when the team hired Sean McDermott to serve in the role on a permanent basis.

List of Buffalo Bills seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Buffalo Bills American football franchise. The list documents the season-by-season records of the Bills' franchise from 1960 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches. The Bills finished their most recent season (2018) with a record of six wins and ten losses.

For complete team history, see History of the Buffalo Bills.

List of California Golden Bears football seasons

The following is a list of California Golden Bears football seasons for the football team that has represented University of California, Berkeley in NCAA competition.

List of Super Bowl head coaches

This is a list of Super Bowl head coaches.

Montreal Alouettes all-time records and statistics

The following is a list of Montreal Alouettes all time records and statistics current to the 2018 CFL season.

This list includes the records for the Montreal Concordes (1982 to 1985) but does not include Baltimore CFLers or Stallions records (1994 to 1995).

New Mexico Sports Hall of Fame

The New Mexico Sports Hall of Fame is a sports hall of fame in the U.S. state of New Mexico. The hall's mission statement states its purpose is "To induct into the Hall of Fame those athletes, coaches, teams or any other individuals who have had significant careers, achieving high standards of athletic success and/or made contributions to sports, thereby bestowing fame and honor to the state of New Mexico. It was first founded in 1973 as the Albuquerque Sports Hall of Fame, and honored those from the Albuquerque region until expanding in 2005 to include other areas of the state. In 2014 the hall assumed its current name.Inducted in the 2016 class were multi-sport athlete and coach Adam Kedge; horse jockey Charmayne James; baseball pitcher Frank Castillo; American football coach Marv Levy; basketball player Danny Granger; baseball coach Jim Johns; and baseball outfielder Cody Ross.The 2015 class of inductees included college baseball coach Ray Birmingham; Olympic discus thrower Carla Garrett; basketball players Sam Lacey and Luc Longley; high school football coach Eric Roanhaus; high school basketball coach Marv Sanders; sportscaster Henry Tafoya; and high school volleyball coach Flo Valdez.

Walt Corey

Walter Martin Corey (born May 9, 1938) is a former American football player and coach. He played college football for the University of Miami.

In 1960, Corey came to the American Football League's Dallas Texans as an undrafted linebacker. He went on to star for the Texans and the Kansas City Chiefs, with whom he was an AFL All-Star in 1963.

Corey later held assistant coaching positions with several teams, including the Buffalo Bills from 1987 to 1994 under head coach Marv Levy. Corey was Buffalo's defensive coordinator for Buffalo's four consecutive AFC Championship teams from 1990 to 1993. He was also the defensive line coach in New Orleans during the Mike Ditka era, from 1997 to 1999. He was the defensive coordinator and Linebackers coach of the Memphis Maniax of the XFL.

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