Marv Cook

Marvin Eugene "Marv" Cook (born February 24, 1966) is a former professional American football player who was selected by the New England Patriots in the third round of the 1989 NFL Draft. A 6'4", 234-lb. tight end from the University of Iowa, Cook played in seven NFL seasons from 1989 to 1995 for the Patriots, the Chicago Bears, and the St. Louis Rams. He was a two-time Pro Bowl selection in 1991 and 1992.

In 1991, Cook was fourth in NFL receptions with 83. His 210 receptions as a Patriot put him 3rd in team history for tight ends behind Rob Gronkowski and Ben Coates.

Marv Cook
No. 46, 85
Position:Tight End
Personal information
Born:February 24, 1966 (age 53)
West Branch, Iowa
Career information
College:Iowa
NFL Draft:1989 / Round: 3 / Pick: 63
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:257
Receiving Yards:2,190
Touchdowns:13
Player stats at NFL.com

Coaching

Since 2007 he has been the head football coach at Regina High School in Iowa City, where he has won seven straight state titles between 2010 and 2016, as well as a state record 56 game winning streak from 2010 to 2013.[1][2]

In 2010, one of Regina's 14 wins was against Class 3A's #1 Ranked team, the Solon Spartans, of the WaMaC Conference, ending Solon's 44 game winning streak.

Regina is the conference rival of Cook's own high school, in West Branch,[3] where his football jersey is retired and in the halls at West Branch High School.

References

  1. ^ K. J. Pilcher, "Regals claim sixth straight state crown", The Gazette, November 23, 2015.
  2. ^ Ryan Murken, "Coaching staff a boost for Regina", Iowa City Press-Citizen, November 22, 2015.
  3. ^ Rob Poggenklass, "Marv Cook named head coach at Regina", West Branch Times, March 7, 2007.
1985 Iowa Hawkeyes football team

The 1985 Iowa Hawkeyes football team represented the University of Iowa in the 1985 Big Ten Conference football season. The team was coached by Hayden Fry and played their home games at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City, Iowa.

1987 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1987 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen as All-Big Ten Conference players for the 1987 college football season. The organizations selecting All-Big Ten teams in 1987 included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press International (UPI).The 1987 All-Big Ten teams were led by Michigan State tailback Lorenzo White and Indiana wide receiver Ernie Jones, who were selected as the Co-Big Ten Players of the Year. White led the conference with 16 touchdowns from scrimmage and finished second in the conference with 1,572 rushing yards. Jones led the conference with 66 receptions and 1,265 receiving yards. Other individual award winners included Wisconsin quarterback Tony Lowery as the 1987 Big Ten Freshman of the Year.

1987 Iowa Hawkeyes football team

The 1987 Iowa Hawkeyes football team represented the University of Iowa in the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Hawkeyes played their home games at Kinnick Stadium and were led by head coach Hayden Fry.

1988 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1988 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen as All-Big Ten Conference players for the 1988 NCAA Division I-A football season. The 1988 Michigan Wolverines football team captured seven of the first-team spots on the All-Big Ten teams selected by the conference coaches for the United Press International. The Iowa Hawkeyes followed with six first-team spots, including quarterback Chuck Hartlieb.

1988 College Football All-America Team

The 1988 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1988. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1988 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other notable selectors included Football News, the Gannett News Service, Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

1988 Iowa Hawkeyes football team

The 1988 Iowa Hawkeyes football team represented the University of Iowa in the 1988 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Hawkeyes played their home games at Kinnick Stadium and were led by legendary coach Hayden Fry. The 1988 season marked the 100th season of Iowa Hawkeyes football.

1989 New England Patriots season

The 1989 New England Patriots season was the team's 30th, and 20th in the National Football League. The Patriots finished the season with a record of five wins and eleven losses, and finished fourth in the AFC East Division. After the season, Head Coach Raymond Berry was fired and replaced by Rod Rust.

The Patriots' pass defense surrendered 7.64 yards-per-attempt in 1989, one of the ten worst totals in NFL history.

1991 All-Pro Team

The 1991 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1991. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

1991 New England Patriots season

The 1991 season New England Patriots season was the team's 32nd, and 22nd in the National Football League. The team finished the season with a record of six wins and ten losses, and finished fourth in the AFC East Division. Though the Patriots scored twenty or more points just five times during the season, they were able to upset playoff teams such as the Houston Oilers, Buffalo Bills and New York Jets.

It was the last season where the Patriots were owned by Victor Kiam, who was forced to sell the team to St. Louis businessman James Orthwein in order to settle a debt.

1992 New England Patriots season

The 1992 New England Patriots season was the team’s 33rd year, and 23rd in the National Football League. The Patriots finished the season with a record of two wins and fourteen losses, and finished last in the AFC East Division after finishing 6-10 the previous season.

The Patriots' two wins in weeks eleven and twelve of the 1992 season were preceded by an 0–9 start, and followed with a five-game losing streak to end the season. They received the first overall pick in the following year's draft.

This was the first season where the team was owned by James Orthwein, who bought the team from previous owner Victor Kiam to settle a debt, and the last to have Dick MacPherson as head coach after a two-year tenure. It was also the last season to feature the Patriots' original colors and logo on their primary uniforms, which were overhauled for the following season.

1992 Pro Bowl

The 1992 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 42nd annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1991 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 2, 1992, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,209. The final score was NFC 21, AFC 15.Dan Reeves of the Denver Broncos led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Detroit Lions head coach Wayne Fontes. The referee was Gerald Austin.Michael Irvin of the Dallas Cowboys was the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1993 New England Patriots season

The 1993 New England Patriots season was the franchise’s 34th season overall and 24th in the National Football League. The Patriots finished fourth in the AFC East Division with a record of five wins and eleven losses.

1993 Pro Bowl

The 1993 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1992 season. The game was played on February 7, 1993, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was AFC — 23, NFC — 20. Steve Tasker of the Buffalo Bills was the game's MVP. This was the first Pro Bowl to go into overtime. All four starting linebackers of the New Orleans Saints, who were collectively nicknamed the Dome Patrol, were part of the NFC squad. The Dome Patrol consisted of Rickey Jackson, Sam Mills, Vaughan Johnson, and Pat Swilling. The game's referee was Howard Roe.

1994 Chicago Bears season

The 1994 Chicago Bears season was their 75th regular season completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears matched their 9–7 record under head coach Dave Wannstedt for their first winning season since the end of the 1991 season. The club was one of four teams from the NFC Central to make the playoffs. This was also the NFL's 75th Anniversary so the Bears wore 1920s-era throwback jerseys in a few games. The Bears celebrated their first playoff win since January 6, 1991, with a hard-fought road victory over the NFC Central champion Minnesota Vikings 35–18 before being knocked out by the eventual Super Bowl champion San Francisco 49ers 44–15 at Candlestick Park.

1994 was the last time the Bears made the playoffs during the 1990s as the following seasons would be disastrous. They wouldn't return to postseason contention until 2001.

1995 St. Louis Rams season

The 1995 St. Louis Rams season was the team's 58th year with the National Football League (NFL) and the first of 21 seasons in St. Louis. The Rams looked to start their tenure in St. Louis strong by improving on their 4–12 record from 1994. In their first game in St. Louis, the Rams beat the New Orleans Saints, 17–13, and ultimately got off to a 4–0 start and looked poised to make a statement in the NFC. However, the team struggled later in the season. In week 8, the Rams were pounded, 44–10, by the dominant 49ers at home. Following this loss, the team could not recover, as they only won two more games for the remainder of the season. Ultimately, the Rams slumped to a 7–9 record and missed the playoffs for the sixth consecutive season.

List of Iowa Hawkeyes football honorees

The Iowa Hawkeyes football team was founded in 1889 to represent the University of Iowa in intercollegiate competition, and it has participated in the sport every season since. Over the course of the team's history, individual Hawkeye players of exceptional ability have received many accolades.

Iowa has had several players inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, College Football Hall of Fame, Canadian Football Hall of Fame, and Iowa Sports Hall of Fame. Individual Hawkeyes have won many prestigious national awards, including the Outland Trophy, the Davey O'Brien Award, the Doak Walker Award, the Jim Thorpe Award, and the Heisman Trophy. 92 Hawkeyes have been named a first-team or second-team All-American, and 27 have been named consensus first-team All-Americans.

The Iowa Hawkeyes have had ten players win the Big Ten Most Valuable Player Award, and 219 Hawks have earned All-Big Ten recognition. Iowa has had 244 NFL draft picks, and several former Hawkeye players have gone on to become NFL head coaches or Division I college head coaches.

Regina High School (Iowa)

Regina Catholic Education Center is a PK–12 private, Roman Catholic co-educational school in Iowa City, Iowa, United States. It is located in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Davenport.

University of Iowa Athletics Hall of Fame

The University of Iowa Athletics Hall of Fame is a sports history museum located in the Roy G. Karro Building in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S. The museum pays tribute to the most legendary and influential Iowa Hawkeye sports heroes. Opened in October 2002, the building is located at the northwest corner of Melrose Avenue and Mormon Trek Boulevard. As of 2002, it was directed by Dale Arens.

Offense
Defense
Special teams

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