Marty McManus

Martin Joseph "Marty" McManus (March 14, 1900 – February 18, 1966) was an American baseball player and manager.

A native of Chicago, Illinois, McManus spent two years in the United States Army before beginning his professional baseball career in 1920. He played professional baseball for 22 years from 1920 to 1941, including 15 seasons in Major League Baseball, principally as a second baseman (927 games) and third baseman (725 games) for the St. Louis Browns (1920-1926), Detroit Tigers (1927-1931), Boston Red Sox (1931-1933), and Boston Braves (1934). He had four seasons in which he compiled a batting average above .300, including a .333 average in 1923 and a .320 average in 1930. He led the American League with 23 stolen bases in 1930 and with 44 doubles in 1925. In 15 major league seasons, he compiled a .289 batting average (1,926-for-6,660) with 1,008 runs scored, 401 doubles and 88 triples.

McManus also served as a manager or player-manager with several baseball teams, beginning with the Boston Red Sox in 1932 and 1933. He was also a player-manager of the St. Paul Saints in 1935, the Tulsa Oilers in 1936, the Williamsport Grays in 1938 and 1939, the San Antonio Missions in 1940 and 1941, and the Denver Bears in 1947. He also served as a manager in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League for the Kenosha Comets in 1944 and the South Bend Blue Sox in 1945 and 1948. In 1951, he led an effort to unionize professional baseball, football, and basketball players under the umbrella of the American Federation of Labor.

Marty McManus
Marty McManus
McManus in 1922
Second baseman / Third baseman / Manager
Born: March 14, 1900
Chicago, Illinois
Died: February 18, 1966 (aged 65)
St. Louis, Missouri
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 26, 1920, for the St. Louis Browns
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1934, for the Boston Braves
MLB statistics
Batting average.289
Home runs120
Runs batted in992
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

Early years

McManus was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1900.[1] He was the son of Irish immigrants, Martin J. and Kate McManus. As a young man, he worked at a Chicago department store. He served in the United States Army in 1918 and 1919 and was stationed in the Panama Canal Zone.[2]

Professional baseball

Minor leagues

McManus began his professional baseball career in 1920 with the Tulsa Oilers of the Western League. He compiled a .283 batting average and totaled 31 doubles, 11 triples and 10 home runs in 143 games with the Oilers in 1920.[3]

St. Louis Browns

On August 12, 1920, McManus was sold by the Tulsa club to the St. Louis Browns.[4] He appeared in only one game during the 1920 season, compiling a triple and an RBI in three at bats on September 25, 1920.[1]

McManus became a regular player for the Browns from 1921 to 1926. In 1921, he appeared in 121 games, 96 at second base, 13 at third base, nine at first base, and two at shortstop, and compiled a .260 batting average, eight triples and 64 RBIs.[1]

In 1922, McManus had perhaps his best major league season. He appeared in 154 games for the Browns, 153 of them as the Browns' starting second baseman. He compiled a .312 batting average and ranked among the American League leaders with 109 RBIs (third), 189 hits (eighth), 278 total bases (eighth), 34 doubles (eighth), and 11 triples (10th). He also ranked as one of the league's top defensive second baseman with a 1.2 defensive WAR rating (third), 398 putouts at second base (third), 467 assists at second base (fourth), 102 double plays turned at second place (second), 32 errors at second base (first), and a 5.65 range factor rating at second base (second).[1] The 1922 Browns team finished one game behind the pennant-winning Yankees, the closest McManus would ever come to the postseason.

In 1923, McManus again appeared in 154 games for the Browns, 133 at second base and 20 at first base. He compiled a .309 batting average and .367 on-base percentage and finished 15th in the voting for the American League Most Valuable Player award. He ranked among the league's leaders with 60 extra base hits (fifth), 15 home runs (seventh), 94 RBIs (seventh), a .481 slugging percentage (seventh), and 280 total bases (seventh). He also ranked among the leading defensive second basemen in the league with 386 putouts (third), 373 assists (fourth), 86 double plays turned (second), 32 errors (second), a .960 fielding percentage (fourth) and a 5.71 range factor per game (fourth).[1]

McManus held out at the start of the 1924 season, finally signing with the Browns in mid-April.[5][6] He appeared in 123 games (119 at second base) for the 1924 Browns, compiled the best batting average of his career at .333 in 517 at bats, and led the American League with 44 doubles.[1] After the 1924 season, McManus asked to be traded,[7] but he remained with the Browns.

McManus held out again in 1925, finally signing with the Browns in early April.[8] He appeared in 154 games for the 1925 Browns, all at second base, and compiled a .288 batting average and .371 on-base percentage. He led the American League with 44 doubles and 69 strikeouts and finished 21st in the voting for the league's MVP award. He also ranked among the league's leaders with 65 extra base hits (fourth), 108 runs scored (seventh), 13 home runs (ninth), and 268 total bases (ninth).[1]

McManus spent his sixth full season with the Browns in 1926. He appeared in 149 games for the Browns, 84 at third base and 61 at second base. He compiled a .284 batting average and .350 on-base percentage and ranked 18th in the balloting for the American League Most Valuable Player award. He led the league with a 3.76 range factor rating per game at third base and ranked among the league's leaders with 102 runs scored (sixth), nine home runs (ninth), 62 strikeouts (fourth), and 18 double plays turned at third base (third).[1] McManus also pulled off the hidden ball trick in his last season with the Browns. On June 30, 1926, with Ty Cobb coaching third base, McManus caught Hall of Famer Harry Heilmann with a hidden ball trick.[9]

Detroit Tigers

On January 15, 1927, McManus was traded by the Browns to the Detroit Tigers in a multi-player deal.[10] At the time of the trade, McManus expressed thanks for being traded away from the Browns and promised to play "his head off" to repay the Tigers for rendering a service in getting him released.[11]

McManus played a total of five years for Detroit, playing at every infield position. In his first year with the Tigers, he appeared in 108 games, 39 at shortstop, 35 at second base, 21 at third base, and six at first base, and compiled a .268 batting average.[1] In 1928, he appeared in 139 games, 92 at third base and 45 at first base, and batted .288. In 1929, he became the Tigers' starting third baseman, started all 154 games for the club, and posted a .280 batting average.[1] In July 1929, he hit two grand slams in three days for the Tigers.

McManus had his best season for the Tigers in 1930. He appeared in 132 games, 130 at third base, and compiled a .320 batting average and .396 on-base percentage. He also led the American League with 23 stolen bases at age 30.[1]

After the 1930 season, McManus underwent surgery to remove a piece of muscle in his right knee. He was unable to bat during the early portion of spring training in 1931.[12] He appeared in 107 games for the 1931 Tigers, 79 at third base and 21 at second base. However, his batting average dropped nearly 50 points from .320 to .271.[1]

McManus also developed into a solid third baseman during his years in Detroit. In 1930, he led American League third basemen in putouts (152), double plays (23), and fielding percentage (.966).[1] He had 206 putouts at third base in 1929 — a total that has not been exceeded since that year by any Detroit third baseman.

Boston Red Sox and Braves

On August 31, 1931, the Tigers traded McManus to the Boston Red Sox for Muddy Ruel.[13] In 1932, the Red Sox compiled an 11-44 record through mid-June.[14] On June 19, 1932, the team's manager, Shano Collins, resigned his position, stating that he was so discouraged he could not go on. Team president Bob Quinn asked Collins where he could find a replacement, and Collins suggested McManus.[15] The Red Sox compiled a 32-67 record under McManus during the latter half of the 1932 season.[14] McManus was a player-manager in 1932, appearing in 93 games, including 49 at second base and 30 at third base.[1]

In 1933, McManus returned to the Red Sox as player-manager. He appeared in 106 games, 76 at third base and 26 at second base, and compiled a .284 batting average and .369 on-base percentage.[1] The 1933 Boston Red Sox compiled a 63-86 record under McManus, a 20-game improvement over the 1932 Red Sox.[16] On October 2, 1933, the Red Sox gave McManus his unconditional release, and he was replaced as manager by Bucky Harris.[17]

Dodgers and Braves

In January 1934, McManus was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers.[18][19] He compiled a .340 batting average in exhibition games for the Dodgers, but first year manager Casey Stengel concluded that McManus was disgruntled at being with the Dodgers. Accordingly, on April 11, 1934, Stengel released McManus.[20] McManus was then acquired on waivers by the Boston Braves.[20] McManus appeared in 114 games for the Braves, 73 at second base and 37 at third base, and compiled a .276 batting average and a .330 on-base percentage. He appeared in his final major league game at age 34 on September 30, 1934.[1]

Minor league manager

On December 7, 1934, McManus was hired as a player-manager for the St. Paul Saints in the American Association.[21] He compiled a .275 batting average for St. Paul in 1935.[3] On September 12, 1935, McManus announced that he would not return to the Saints in 1936.[22]

In 1936, he returned to the Tulsa Oilers, the team with which he began his professional baseball career, as player-manager.[23] He compiled a .271 batting average for Tulsa in 101 games during the 1936 season.[3]

In 1937, McManus played third base for the Albany Senators in the New York–Pennsylvania League. He compiled a .244 batting average in 24 games before being released in early June.[3][24]

In December 1937, McManus was hired as player-manager of the Williamsport Grays of the Eastern League.[25] He remained with Williamsport for two years through the 1938 and 1939 seasons.[3]

On February 17, 1940, he was hired as the manager of the San Antonio Missions of the Texas League.[26] He remained with San Antonio for the 1940 and 1941 seasons.[3]

In 1943, McManus was employed as a sheet metal worker doing war work at a Chrysler plant in Chicago.[27]

In April 1944, McManus was hired to manage one of the clubs in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.[28] He began his career in the league as the manager of the Kenosha Comets.[29] He managed the Kenosha squad to the first half championship and lost to Milwaukee in the playoffs. In January 1945, McManus announced that he would return to Kenosha, having rejected an offer to return to men's baseball. He noted: "It is a lot of fun managing those girls. They know how to play the game, catch signals in a hurry and put everything they have into their play."[30] He ended up as manager of the South Bend Blue Sox of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League in 1945.[31] In 1946, he managed the Chicago Bloomer Girls.[31]

In February 1947, McManus was hired as the manager of the Denver Bears of the Western League.[32] After compiling a 54-75 record with Denver in 1947, McManus resigned to return to the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.[2]

In 1948, McManus ended his managerial career with the South Bend Blue Sox, the team he had coached in 1945.[33]

Later years

McManus married Mary Barton in 1934 in South Bend, Indiana. In 1951, McManus led an effort to unionize professional baseball, football, and basketball players under the umbrella of the American Federation of Labor.[34]

McManus died in 1966, shortly after undergoing cancer surgery, at Cochran Veterans Hospital in Florissant, Missouri. He was 65 years old.[1][35] He was buried at Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum in St. Louis.[36]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Marty McManus". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  2. ^ a b Bill Nowlin. "Marty McManus". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Marty McManus Minor League Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  4. ^ "M'Manus To Browns". The Wichita Beacon. August 12, 1920. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  5. ^ "Marty McManus, Brown Infielder, Is Holdout". Houston Post. February 3, 1924. p. 17 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  6. ^ "Marty McManus Signs". Shiner (TX) Gazette. April 24, 1924. p. 6 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  7. ^ "Star Infielder Asks Browns to Trade Him Off". Ironwood Daily Globe. November 29, 1924. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  8. ^ "Marty McManus Signs". The Evening News (Harrisburg, PA). April 2, 1925. p. 21 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  9. ^ "Cobb Goes To Sleep: And Browns Work Hidden Ball Trick on Heilmann". The Cincinnati Enquirer. July 1, 1926 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  10. ^ "Tigers Obtain McManus in Three-Way Deal Involving St. Louis and Toronto: Browns Land Mullen and O'Rourke To Replace Veteran Second Baseman". The Detroit Free Press. January 16, 1927. p. 17 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  11. ^ "M'Manus Here To See Navin: New Second Baseman Says He Is Pleased to Be With Tigers". The Detroit Free Press. January 29, 1927. p. 17 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  12. ^ "Marty McManus Sure of Retaining His Job: Veteran's Knee Apparently Is As Good As Ever and He Only Needs to Be Convinced That Leg Is Sound to Hit His Stride". The Detroit Free Press. April 5, 1931. p. 18 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  13. ^ "Boost Seen For Marty: McManus, Traded To Red Sox, May Lead Team". Detroit Free Press. September 1, 1931. p. 19 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  14. ^ a b "1932 Boston Red Sox". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  15. ^ "Collins Resigns as Red Sox Pilot". The Scranton Republican. June 20, 1932. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  16. ^ "1933 Boston Red Sox". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  17. ^ "McManus Out as Manager of Boston Red Sox". The Courier-Journal. October 3, 1933. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  18. ^ "Dodger Infield Likely to Be Bolstered by Acquisition of Marty McManus: Quinn Wants Him, But It's Up To Carey to Say the Final Word". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. January 11, 1934. p. 19 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  19. ^ "Brooklyn Signs Marty McManus". Moberly Monitor-Index. January 31, 1934. p. 5 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  20. ^ a b "Release of McManus Costly But Shows Casey's Aim Is Harmony in Ranks". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. April 12, 1934. p. 22 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  21. ^ "McManus Named St. Paul Manager". The Courier-Journal. December 8, 1934. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  22. ^ "Marty McManus Says He's Quitting Saints". The Racine Journal-Times. September 12, 1935. p. 18 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  23. ^ "Griggs Goes In For Rebuilding Tulsa Oilers In Wholesale Style This Year: Marty McManus Signed to Manage Club in 1936 Flag Race". Abilene Reporter-News. March 8, 1936. p. 8 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  24. ^ "M'Manus Released". The Plain Speaker. June 3, 1937. p. 16.
  25. ^ "McManus Appointed Williamsport Pilot". Altoona (PA) Tribune. December 8, 1937. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  26. ^ "Marty McManus San Antonio Pilot". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. February 18, 1940. p. 1E – via Newspapers.com. open access
  27. ^ "McManus War Worker". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. April 11, 1943. p. 25 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  28. ^ "Marty McManus Named". The Cincinnati Enquirer. April 23, 1944. p. 35 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  29. ^ "Marty McManus, Former Brownie, Now Bosses Girls' Team in American Pro League". Council Bluffs Nonpareil. July 29, 1944. p. 5 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  30. ^ "Marty McManus Should Worry; He'll Manage Girl Team Again". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. January 14, 1945. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  31. ^ a b "Marty Pants". The Courier-Journal. January 13, 1946. p. 52 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  32. ^ "Marty McManus Denver Manager". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. February 23, 1947. p. 55 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  33. ^ "Dave Bancroft Succeeds Marty McManus as South Bend Manager". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. December 22, 1948. p. 21 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  34. ^ "Marty McManus Heads New Effort to Unionize Players". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. June 3, 1951. p. 62 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  35. ^ "Marty McManus Dead; Browns Star". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. February 18, 1966. p. 18 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  36. ^ "Marty McManus". Find a Grave. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
1921 St. Louis Browns season

The 1921 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing third in the American League with a record of 83 wins and 73 losses.

1922 St. Louis Browns season

The 1922 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns winning 93 games, the only time in franchise history that the Browns topped the 90 win plateau. In the American League standings, the Browns finished in second place behind the New York Yankees. The Browns set a franchise record with 712,918 fans coming to watch the games. This was approximately 100,000 higher than the previous high.

1924 St. Louis Browns season

The 1924 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 4th in the American League with a record of 74 wins and 78 losses. This was George Sisler's first season as manager.

1925 St. Louis Browns season

The 1925 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 3rd in the American League with a record of 82 wins and 71 losses.

1926 St. Louis Browns season

The 1926 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 62 wins and 92 losses.

1927 Detroit Tigers season

The 1927 Detroit Tigers season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Detroit Tigers attempting to win the American League, and they finished in fourth place.

Outfielder Harry Heilmann won his fourth American League batting title with a .398 batting average.

1930 Major League Baseball season

The 1930 Major League Baseball season.

1931 Boston Red Sox season

The 1931 Boston Red Sox season was the 31st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished sixth in the American League (AL) with a record of 62 wins and 90 losses.

1932 Boston Red Sox season

The 1932 Boston Red Sox season was the 32nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 43 wins and 111 losses. The team set franchise records for fewest wins, most losses, and lowest winning percentage (.279) in a season—these records still stand through the end of the 2018 season.

1932 Major League Baseball season

The 1932 Major League Baseball season.

1933 Boston Red Sox season

The 1933 Boston Red Sox season was the 33rd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 63 wins and 86 losses. There were five rainouts, one against the Senators and a four game series against the Chicago White Sox that was cancelled due to the remnants of the 1933 Outer Banks hurricane, which passed to the southeast of New England the third weekend of September.

1933 Major League Baseball season

The 1933 Major League Baseball season featured ballplayers hitting eight cycles, tied for the most of any single major league season; all eight cycles in each of those seasons were hit by different players.

1934 Boston Braves season

The 1934 Boston Braves season was the 64th season of the franchise. The Braves finished in fourth place in the National League with a record of 78 wins and 73 losses.

1934 Brooklyn Dodgers season

Casey Stengel took over as manager for the 1934 Brooklyn Dodgers, but the team still finished in 6th place.

1960 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to Baseball Hall of Fame for 1960 followed a system established after the 1956 election. The Veterans Committee was meeting only in odd-numbered years (until 1962). The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and, same as in 1958, it elected no one. For the third and final time the induction ceremonies in Cooperstown were canceled because there was no one to induct. It was also the last time until 2013 that there were no living inductees (all three members of that induction class, all deceased, were voted in by the Veterans Committee).

Janice O'Hara

Janice Winifred O'Hara [״Jenny״] (November 30, 1918 – March 7, 2001) was a pitcher and utility who played from 1943 through 1949 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Listed at 5 ft 6 in (1.68 m), 122 lb., she batted and threw right-handed.Janice O'Hara was one of the sixty original players to join the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League for its inaugural season. A valuable and versatile player, she had an array of pitches that kept the hitters guessing, and also played several positions competently during her seven years in the league.Born in Beardstown, Illinois, O'Hara started playing organized softball in Springfield in her teen years, until AAGPBL scout Eddie Stumpf interviewed her and sent her to the final tryout at Wrigley Field in Chicago. In the process, she was signed a contract and joined the Kenosha Comets, playing for them her entire career in the league.Comets manager Josh Billings used O'Hara at first base and she hit a respectable .187 average and posted career-numbers in hits (63), triples (6), runs (46) and RBI (28), helping Kenosha win the second half of the 1943 season. The team faced first-half winner Racine Belles in the best-of-five series and was shut out in three games.By 1944, new manager Marty McManus turned O'Hara into a utility player. She collected a personal-high 37 stolen bases and belted the only home run of her career in that season. After that, she mostly played at first base and in the outfield, but also filled at second base and third base through the 1946 season.In 1947 O'Hara was converted into a pitcher by then manager Ralph Shinners. In her repertoire she included a fastball, a curve and specially a knuckleball, which she loved to use. She turned in a 6–8 record with a 3.51 earned run average in 21 appearances. The next year she went 4–6 in 20 games while lowering her ERA to 3.20. Used sparingly in 1949, she had a 2–3 mark and a 4.65 ERA in 11 games.In a seven-year career, O'Hara posted a 13–17 record and a 3.56 ERA in 55 games. As a hitter, she batted a .199 average in 309 games. In three postseason appearances, she batted .130 (3-for-23) in seven games and hurled six innings of shutout ball for a perfect 0.00 ERA.Following her baseball career, O'Hara worked as an accountant for 31 years and retired in 1982. She later spent her time in the garden and attended AAGPBL Players Association reunions. The association was largely responsible for the opening of Women in Baseball, a permanent display at the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York, which was unveiled in 1988 to honor the entire All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.

Janice O'Hara died in 2001 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, at the age of 82.

McManus

McManus is an Irish surname. It is derived from the Gaelic ‘Mac Mághnais’ which means ‘Son of Magnus.’ The given name Magnus comes from the Latin word meaning “great” and it became popular in Ireland during the time of the Vikings. Notable people with the surname include:

Abbie McManus (born 1993), English association football player

Alan McManus (born 1971), Scottish professional snooker player

Alex McManus, American musician

Allan McManus (born 1974), Scottish footballer

Danny McManus (born 1965), American and Canadian football quarterback

Declan McManus (born 1994), Scottish footballer

Doyle McManus (born c. 1952), American journalist

Edward Joseph McManus (1920–2017), American politician and jurist

Erwin McManus (born 1958), lead pastor of Mosaic Church of the emerging church movement

Frank McManus (disambiguation), several people

George McManus (disambiguation), several people

Gerard McManus (born 1960), Australian journalist

Heather Ross-McManus (born 1973), Canadian trampoline gymnast

J. F. A. McManus (Joseph Forde Anthony McManus, 1911–1980), Canadian pathologist

J. P. McManus (John Patrick McManus, born 1951), Irish businessman and racehorse owner

James McManus (disambiguation), several people named James and Jim

Jane McManus, better known under her married names Jane Storm and Jane Cazneau (1807–1878), American journalist

John McManus (disambiguation), several people

Liz McManus (born 1947), Irish Labour Party politician

Louis McManus (1898–1968), American television engineer, film editor, and designer

Mark McManus (1935–1994), Scottish actor best known in Taggart

Marty McManus (1900–1966), American infielder in Major League Baseball

Michael McManus (disambiguation), several people named Michael and Mick

Michaela McManus (born 1983), American actress

Michelle McManus (born 1980), Scottish singer

Michelle McManus (Michigan politician) (born 1966), member of the Michigan Senate

Patrick McManus (disambiguation), several people named Pat or Patrick

Peter McManus (1829–1859), Irish recipient of the Victoria Cross

Rove McManus (John Henry Michael McManus, born 1974), Australian variety show host, comedian, and owner of Roving Enterprises

Sammy McManus (1911–1976), Irish-Canadian professional ice hockey player

Sean McManus (disambiguation), several people

Shaun McManus (born 1976), Australian rules footballer

Shawn McManus (born 1958), American artist

Stephen McManus (born 1982), professional footballer

Thomas McManus (disambiguation), several people

Tim McManus, fictional character of Oz

Tony McManus (disambiguation)

William McManus (1780–1835), U.S. Congressman from New York

South Bend Blue Sox

The South Bend Blue Sox was a women's professional baseball team who played from 1943 through 1954 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. A founding member, the team represented South Bend, Indiana, and played their home games at Bendix Field (1943–1945) and Playland Park (1946–1954).

The Blue Sox was one of two teams to play in every AAGPBL season without relocating, the other being the Rockford Peaches. Often a second-division team, they appeared in six playoff series and won two league titles.

In the 1943 inaugural season, The Blue Sox finished in third place with a 51–40 mark, only .001 percentage point behind second place Kenosha Comets. Together, pitchers Margaret Berger and Doris Barr threw 79 of the 91 games played by the Sox. Berger was credited with 25 wins and Barr with 15, while Berger posted her greatest triumph in a 13-inning match, which she won 1–0.

The next three years, South Bend finished 64–55 (1944), 49–60 (1945), 70–42 (1946), 57–54 (1947) and 57–59 (1948). After falling in their playoff intents, in the 1949 season the team posted the best record in with a 75–36 mark. That year they were swept in the playoffs, 4-to-0, by Rockford, after getting a first-round bye along with them. The South Bend club went on to win their next four playoffs in claiming back-to-back championship titles in 1951 and 1952. After that, the Blue Sox finished in last place both in the 1953 and 1954 seasons.

Apart from the aforementioned Barr and Berger, the South Bend included talented players as Mary Baker (C), Jean Faut (P) Betsy Jochum (OF/1B), Elizabeth Mahon (OF), Betty Whiting (IF), and Dottie Schroeder (SS), who played with four teams to become the only girl to play through the 12 years of existence of the circuit.

Spencer Pumpelly (baseball)

Spencer Armstrong Pumpelly (April 11, 1893 – December 5, 1973) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. Pumpelly played in one game for the Washington Senators against the St. Louis Browns on July 11, 1925. He entered in the bottom of the 6th inning, with the Senators trailing the Browns 2-9, and allowed a home run to Marty McManus, walked Baby Doll Jacobson, induced a pop-out from Pinky Hargrave, and induced a 6-4 double-play from Gene Robertson to end the inning.

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