Martin XB-33 Super Marauder

The Martin B-33 was a World War II American bomber aircraft. It was designed by the Glenn L. Martin Company as the Martin Model 190 and was a high-altitude derivative of the company's B-26 Marauder. Two different designs were developed, first as a twin-engined aircraft and then as a four-engined aircraft. The four-engined version was ordered by the United States Army Air Forces, but the program was cancelled before any aircraft were built.

XB-33 Super Marauder
Role Medium bomber
National origin United States
Manufacturer Glenn L. Martin Company
Status Cancelled 25 November 1942
Primary user United States Army Air Forces
Number built None
Developed from B-26 Marauder

Design and development

XB-33

Martin XB-33 Super Marauder (schematic blueprint)
Schematic blueprint drawing of the XB-33.

The first version of the B-33 design, the XB-33, was a twin-tailed medium bomber with two Wright R-3350 engines and pressurised crew compartments; its design began in 1940. It would carry around 4,000 lb (1,814 kg) of bombs. Soon after design of the XB-33 began it became clear that a twin-engined aircraft would not achieve the performance requested by the army. The company moved on to developing a larger four-engined design, but the two prototypes ordered by the USAAF were not built.

XB-33A

Following the abandonment of the original twin-engined design, the company continued to design a larger four-engined aircraft, and two prototypes were ordered by the USAAF as the XB-33A; its bombload was to have been 12,000 lb (5,443 kg), as much as that of the B-24 Liberator, the heaviest US bomber flown in combat prior to the B-29.

The original XB-33 design was to have been powered by the R-3350, the redesigned XB-33A was to have used Wright R-2600 engines. The main reason for this was the demand for R-3350s for the B-29, one of the most highly valued projects of the Army Air Forces.

On January 17, 1942, the USAAF placed an order for 400 B-33As, to be built at the government-owned plant in Omaha, Nebraska, operated by Martin. On November 25, 1942, the project was cancelled to allow the Omaha plant to concentrate on manufacturing B-29s.

Variants

XB-33
Prototype medium bomber powered by two 1,800 hp (1,343 kW) R-3350 engines, two cancelled.[1]
XB-33A
Prototype medium bomber powered by four 1,800 hp (1,343 kW) R-2600-15 engines, two cancelled.[1]
B-33A Super Marauder
Production variant of XB-33A, 400 on order cancelled.[1]

Specifications (B-33A, as designed)

Orthographically projected diagram.


General characteristics

Performance (estimated)

Armament

  • Guns: 8× .50 in (12.7 mm) machine guns
  • Bombs: 10,000 lb (4,500 kg)

See also

Related development

Related lists

References

Notes
  1. ^ a b c Andrade 1979, p 51
Bibliography
  • Encyclopedia of American Aircraft
  • Andrade, John (1979). U.S.Military Aircraft Designations and Serials since 1909. Midland Counties Publications. ISBN 0-904597-22-9.
Consolidated B-32 Dominator

The Consolidated B-32 Dominator (Consolidated Model 34) was an American heavy strategic bomber built for United States Army Air Forces during World War II, which had the distinction of being the last Allied aircraft to be engaged in combat during World War II. It was developed by Consolidated Aircraft in parallel with the Boeing B-29 Superfortress as a fallback design should the B-29 prove unsuccessful. The B-32 only reached units in the Pacific during mid-1945, and subsequently only saw limited combat operations against Japanese targets before the end of the war. Most of the extant orders of the B-32 were canceled shortly thereafter and only 118 B-32 airframes of all types were built.

Glenn L. Martin Company

The Glenn L. Martin Company was an American aircraft and aerospace manufacturing company founded by aviation pioneer Glenn L. Martin. The Martin Company produced many important aircraft for the defense of the US and allies, especially during World War II and the Cold War. During the 1950s and 60s, the Martin Company moved from the aircraft industry into the guided missile, space exploration, and space utilization industries.

In 1961, the Martin Company merged with American-Marietta Corporation, a large sand and gravel mining company, forming Martin Marietta Corporation. In 1995, Martin Marietta merged with aerospace giant Lockheed to form the Lockheed Martin Corporation.

Junkers Ju 288

The Junkers Ju 288, originally known within the Junkers firm as the EF 074, was a German bomber project designed during World War II, which only ever flew in prototype form. The first of an eventual 22 development aircraft flew on 29 November 1940.

The Ju 288 was the winner of the Bomber B contest, although the contest was started by the Junkers firm's submission of the EF 074 and their selection was never really in doubt. The Bomber B concept of a Schnellbomber was originally intended to replace the Junkers Ju 88 with a design that was larger, offered cabin pressurization for high altitude work, had longer range, a much greater warload, was even faster, and had improved defensive firepower. The design was intended to replace all the bombers then in Luftwaffe service.

Delivering all of these requirements in a single airframe demanded much more powerful engines, and all of the Bomber B concepts, at one time or another, relied on the Junkers Jumo 222 engine to deliver this power. Ultimately, the Jumo 222 was a failure in spite of massive effort and several redesigns over a period of several years, with nearly 300 development prototypes produced. No suitable replacement was ever forthcoming, dooming the Ju 288 program, and leaving the Luftwaffe with older bomber designs during the second half of World War II.

List of United States bomber aircraft

This is a list of United States bomber aircraft

List of bomber aircraft

The following is a list of bomber airplanes and does not include bomber airships, organized by era and manufacturer. A bomber is a military aircraft designed to attack ground or sea targets.

Martin B-26 Marauder

The Martin B-26 Marauder is an American twin-engined medium bomber built by the Glenn L. Martin Company in Middle River, Maryland (just east of Baltimore) from 1941 to 1945. First used in the Pacific Theater of World War II in early 1942, it was also used in the Mediterranean Theater and in Western Europe.

After entering service with the United States Army aviation units, the aircraft quickly received the reputation of a "widowmaker" due to the early models' high accident rate during takeoffs and landings. This was due to the fact that the Marauder had to be flown at exact airspeeds, particularly on final runway approach or when one engine was out. The unusually high 150 mph (241 km/h) speed on short final runway approach was intimidating to many pilots who were used to much slower approach speeds, and whenever they slowed down to speeds below what the manual stipulated, the aircraft would often stall and crash.The B-26 became a safer aircraft once crews were re-trained, and after aerodynamics modifications (an increase of wingspan and wing angle-of-incidence to give better takeoff performance, and a larger vertical stabilizer and rudder). The Marauder ended World War II with the lowest loss rate of any USAAF bomber.A total of 5,288 were produced between February 1941 and March 1945; 522 of these were flown by the Royal Air Force and the South African Air Force. By the time the United States Air Force was created as an independent military service separate from the United States Army in 1947, all Martin B-26s had been retired from U.S. service. After the Marauder was retired the unrelated Douglas A-26 Invader then assumed the "B-26" designation which led to confusion between the two aircraft.

Martin XB-27

The Martin XB-27 (Martin Model 182) was an aircraft proposed by the Glenn L. Martin Company to fill a strong need in the United States Army Air Corps for a high-altitude medium bomber. Its design was based approximately on that of Martin's own B-26 Marauder. The XB-27 remained on paper, and no prototypes were built.

North American XB-28 Dragon

The North American XB-28 (NA-63) Dragon was an aircraft proposed by North American Aviation to fill a strong need in the United States Army Air Corps for a high-altitude medium bomber. It never entered into production, with only two prototypes being built.

Wright R-3350 Duplex-Cyclone

The Wright R-3350 Duplex-Cyclone is a twin-row, supercharged, air-cooled, radial aircraft engine with 18 cylinders displacing nearly 55 L. Power ranged from 2,200 to over 3,700 hp (1,640 to 2,760 kW), depending on the model. Developed before World War II, the R-3350's design required a long time to mature before finally being used to power the Boeing B-29 Superfortress. After the war, the engine had matured sufficiently to become a major civilian airliner design, notably in its turbo-compound forms, and was used in the Lockheed L-1049 Super Constellation airliners into the 1990s. The engine is now commonly used on Hawker Sea Fury and Grumman F8F Bearcat Unlimited Class Racers at the Reno Air Races. Its main rival was the Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major.

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