Martin H. Greenberg

Martin Harry Greenberg (March 1, 1941 – June 25, 2011)[2] was an American academic and speculative fiction anthologist. In all, he compiled 1,298 anthologies and commissioned over 8,200 original short stories.[3] He founded Tekno Books, a packager of more than 2000 published books.[1][4] As well, he was a co-founder of the Sci-Fi Channel.[1][3] Greenberg was also a terrorism and Middle East expert. He was a long-time friend, colleague and business partner of Isaac Asimov.

Martin H. Greenberg
BornMartin Harry Greenberg
March 1, 1941
South Miami Beach, Florida, USA
DiedJune 25, 2011 (aged 70)
Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA
OccupationUniversity professor, editor, writer
NationalityAmerican
EducationPh.D., Political science, 1969
Period1974–2011 (as anthologist)
GenreSpeculative fiction anthologies
SubjectUrban and regional science; Middle East affairs, terrorism[1]

Biography

Greenberg was born to Max and Mae Greenberg in South Miami Beach, Florida. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Miami, a doctorate in political science from the University of Connecticut in 1969, and taught at the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay from 1975 until 1996.[1] Early in his career he was sometimes confused with Martin Greenberg, publisher of Gnome Press; they were not related. Isaac Asimov suggested that he call himself "Martin H. Greenberg" or "Martin Harry Greenberg" to distinguish him from the other Martin Greenberg "if he expected to deal fruitfully with the science-fiction world".[1][5]

Greenberg's first anthology (and first speculative fiction publication) was Political Science Fiction: An Introductory Reader (Prentice-Hall, 1974), edited with Patricia S. Warrick and intended for use as a teaching guide.[1][6] Warrick was a colleague at one of the UW two-year colleges, University of Wisconsin–Fox Valley, who recruited Greenberg to give one lecture on the future of politics. He learned that her course used one science fiction text; she learned of his interest and made a "career-changing comment".[1] Ten educational anthologies under the series name Through Science Fiction followed through 1978, mainly from Rand McNally.[6][a] In the late 1970s Greenberg began partnering with Joseph D. Olander on more conventional science fiction anthologies. They also created the critical series Writers of the 21st Century (Taplinger, 1977 to 1983) produced six of its seven volumes, each titled for its featured author.[4][7][b]

Greenberg typically teamed up with another editor, splitting the duties of story selection, editing, copyright searches, and handling royalties to authors. Major partners include Isaac Asimov (127 anthologies), Charles G. Waugh (193 anthologies), Jane Yolen, and Robert Silverberg. He and Mark Tier shared two Prometheus Special Awards in 2005 for jointly creating the anthologies Give Me Liberty and Visions of Liberty (Baen Books, 2004).[8] He also shared one Bram Stoker Award from the horror writers for the 1998 anthology Horrors! 365 Scary Stories.[8]

The Horror Writers Association gave Greenberg its highest honor in 2003, the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement recognizing superior work that "substantially influenced the horror genre".[8][9] He also received the Ellery Queen Award, which honors "outstanding people in the mystery-publishing industry", from the Mystery Writers of America in 1995[4][10] and one of three inaugural Solstice Awards in 2009, from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America for his lifetime contributions to their field.[8][11]

Greenberg died in Green Bay, Wisconsin on June 25, 2011 from complications of cancer. He was survived by two stepdaughters from his first wife, by his second wife, and by their daughter.[1] He is buried at the Cnesses Israel Hebrew Cemetery in Green Bay.[12]

Selected anthologies edited

Notes

  1. ^ a b Following the Political Science Fiction reader Greenberg created ten Through Science Fiction anthologies. Two published by St. Martin's Press in 1974 were collaborations with Warrick and another editor: Anthropology Through Science Fiction with Carol Mason and Introductory Psychology Through Science Fiction with Harvey A. Katz.
     Six titles published by Rand McNally College Publishing Co from 1974 to 1976 were edited by Greenberg, Olander, Warrick, and another colleague: Sociology —; School and Society —; American Government —; Social Problems —; Run to Starlight, Sports —; and Marriage and the Family Through Science Fiction. Greenberg and Olander alone produced Criminal Justice — and International Relations— (McNally, 1977, 1978).
     ISFDB does not catalog this as a book series and for Greenberg catalogs the ten prefaces and introductions as "Essays".
  2. ^ Greenberg and Olander collected critical essays on Clarke, Asimov, Heinlein, Le Guin, Bradbury, and Dick. Tim Underwood and Chuck Miller covered Vance in #6.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Ian Randal Strock (June 27, 2011). "Anthologist Martin H(arry) Greenberg Dies". SFScope. Archived from the original on July 10, 2012. Retrieved 2011-06-28. Archived 2012-07-10.
  2. ^ "RIP: Martin H. Greenberg 1941–2011". Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA). Retrieved 2013-04-27.
  3. ^ a b "Martin H. Greenberg (1941–2011)", John Helfers, Chicon 7 program, 2012, p. 107.
  4. ^ a b c "Martin H. Greenberg (1941–2011)". Locus. Locus Publications. June 25, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-26.
  5. ^ Asimov, Isaac (1980). In Joy Still Felt, 1954–1978. Asimov's Autobiography. 2. New York, NY: Avon Books. p. 758. ISBN 0-380-53025-2.
  6. ^ a b c d Martin H. Greenberg at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB). Retrieved 2013-04-27. Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Select a particular edition (title) for more data at that level, such as a front cover image or linked contents.
  7. ^ "Writers of the 21st Century – Series Bibliography". ISFDB. Retrieved 2013-04-27.
  8. ^ a b c d "Greenberg, Martin H." Locus Index to SF Awards: Index of Literary Nominees. Locus Publications. Archived from the original on 2012-10-16. Retrieved 2013-04-27.
  9. ^ "Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement" Archived 2013-05-09 at the Wayback Machine.. Horror Writers Association. Retrieved 2013-04-28.
  10. ^ ""The Ellery Queen Award"". Archived from the original on February 26, 2008. Retrieved 2013-04-28.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link) (winners 1983 to 2006). Mystery Writers of America. Archived 2008-02-26. Retrieved 2013-04-28.
  11. ^ Nebula Awards Ceremony 2009. Los Angeles, CA: SFWA. 2009. p. 13.
  12. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20110629144001/http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/greenbaypressgazette/obituary.aspx?n=martin-h-greenberg&pid=152196623

Further reading

  • I Have an Idea for a Book... (bibliography of Martin H. Greenberg), August 2012, ISBN 978-1-55246-644-5, published by The Battered Silicon Dispatch Box, with an introduction by John Helfers

External links

Arbor House

Arbor House was an independent publishing house founded by Donald Fine in 1969. Specializing in hard cover publications, Arbor House published works by Hortense Calisher, Ken Follett, Cynthia Freeman, Elmore Leonard and Irwin Shaw before being acquired by the Hearst Corporation in 1979 to move into paperback publishing. Arbor House became an imprint of William Morrow & Company in 1988.

Atlantis (anthology)

Atlantis is an anthology of themed fantasy and science fiction short stories on the subject of Atlantis edited by Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh as the ninth volume in their Isaac Asimov's Magical Worlds of Fantasy series. It was first published in paperback by Signet/New American Library in January 1988.The book collects eleven novellas, novelettes and short stories by various fantasy and science fiction authors, with an introduction by Asimov.

Comets (anthology)

Comets is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh as the fourth volume in their Isaac Asimov's Wonderful Worlds of Science Fiction series. It was first published in paperback by Signet/New American Library in February 1986.The book collects twenty novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, together with an introduction by Asimov.

Cosmic Knights

Cosmic Knights is an anthology of themed fantasy and science fiction short stories on the subject of knights edited by Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh. The third volume in their Isaac Asimov's Magical Worlds of Fantasy series, it was first published in paperback by Signet/New American Library in January 1985. The first British edition was issued in trade paperback by Robinson in July 1987.The book collects ten novellas, novelettes and short stories by various fantasy and science fiction authors, with an introduction by Asimov.

Dystopia

A dystopia (from the Greek δυσ- "bad" and τόπος "place"; alternatively, cacotopia, kakotopia, or simply anti-utopia) is a community or society that is undesirable or frightening. It is translated as "not-good place" and is an antonym of utopia, a term that was coined by Sir Thomas More and figures as the title of his best known work, Utopia, published 1516, a blueprint for an ideal society with minimal crime, violence and poverty.

Dystopian societies appear in many artistic works, particularly in stories set in the future. Some of the most famous examples are George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Dystopias are often characterized by dehumanization, tyrannical governments, environmental disaster, or other characteristics associated with a cataclysmic decline in society. Dystopian societies appear in many sub-genres of fiction and are often used to draw attention to society, environment, politics, economics, religion, psychology, ethics, science or technology. Some authors use the term to refer to existing societies, many of which are or have been totalitarian states or societies in an advanced state of collapse.

Some scholars, such as Gregory Claeys and Lyman Tower Sargent, make certain distinctions between typical synonyms of dystopias. For example, Claeys and Sargent define literary dystopias as societies imagined as substantially worse than the society in which the author writes, whereas anti-utopias function as criticisms of attempts to implement various concepts of utopia.

Foundation's Friends

Foundation's Friends, Stories in Honor of Isaac Asimov is a 1989 book written in honor of science fiction author Isaac Asimov, in the form of an anthology of short stories set in Asimov's universes, particularly the Robot/Empire/Foundation universe. The anthology was edited by Martin H. Greenberg, and contributing authors include Ray Bradbury, Robert Silverberg, Frederik Pohl, Poul Anderson, Harry Turtledove, and Orson Scott Card. A "revised and expanded" edition was published in 1997, which added numerous memorials and appreciations written by those who knew him, many of them well-known authors and editors from the science fiction field.

Hardback: ISBN 0-312-93174-3

Paperback: ISBN 0-8125-0980-3

Revised and Expanded Edition (Paperback): ISBN 0-8125-6770-6

Full Moon City

Full Moon City is an anthology of fantasy/horror short stories on the subject of lycanthropy, edited by Darrell Schweitzer and Martin H. Greenberg. It was first published as an ebook by Pocket Books in February 2010, and in paperback by the same publisher in March 2010.

Henry Slesar

Henry Slesar (June 12, 1927 – April 2, 2002) was an American author, playwright, and copywriter. He is famous for his use of irony and twist endings. After reading Slesar's "M Is for the Many" in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Alfred Hitchcock bought it for adaptation and they began many successful collaborations. Slesar wrote hundreds of scripts for television series and soap operas, leading TV Guide to call him "the writer with the largest audience in America."

Isaac Asimov's Magical Worlds of Fantasy

Isaac Asimov's Magical Worlds of Fantasy is a series of twelve themed paperback fantasy and science fiction anthologies edited by Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh, a companion set to the ten volume Isaac Asimov's Wonderful Worlds of Science Fiction, produced by the same editors. It was published by Signet/New American Library from 1983 to 1991. Volumes 1 and 2 were also issued in hardcover in an omnibus collection titled Isaac Asimov's Magical Worlds of Fantasy: Witches & Wizards.Each volume in the series featured stories devoted to a different fantastic theme, as indicated in the individual volume titles. Most volumes also included an introduction by Asimov.

Isaac Asimov's Wonderful Worlds of Science Fiction

Isaac Asimov's Wonderful Worlds of Science Fiction is a series of ten themed paperback science fiction anthologies edited by Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh, a companion set to the twelve volume Isaac Asimov's Magical Worlds of Fantasy, produced by the same editors. It was published by Signet/New American Library from 1983 to 1990.Each volume in the series featured stories devoted to a different science fictional theme, as indicated in the individual volume titles. Most volumes also included an introduction by Asimov.

Jean Rabe

Jean Rabe (born June 19, 1957) is a fantasy and science fiction author and editor who has worked on the Dragonlance, Forgotten Realms, and BattleTech series, as well as many others.

Loren D. Estleman

Loren D. Estleman (born September 15, 1952 in Ann Arbor, Michigan) is an American writer of detective and Western fiction. He is known for a series of crime novels featuring the investigator Amos Walker.

Robert Adams (science fiction writer)

Franklin Robert Adams (August 31, 1933 – January 4, 1990), who wrote as Robert Adams, was an American science fiction and fantasy writer, and formerly a career soldier. He is best known for his Horseclans books.

Robert Bloch's Psychos

Robert Bloch's Psychos is a 1997 horror anthology that was being edited by American writer Robert Bloch until his death in 1994. Martin H. Greenberg completed the editorial work posthumously.

Robert Weinberg (author)

Robert Weinberg (also credited as Bob Weinberg, August 29, 1946 – September 25, 2016) was an American author, editor, publisher, and collector of science fiction. His work spans several genres including non-fiction, science fiction, horror, and comic books.

Robots, Androids, and Mechanical Oddities

Robots, Androids, and Mechanical Oddities: The Science Fiction of Philip K. Dick is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Philip K. Dick. It was first published by the Southern Illinois University Press in 1984 and was edited by Patricia S. Warrick and Martin H. Greenberg. The stories had originally appeared in the magazines Fantasy and Science Fiction, Galaxy Science Fiction, Space Science Fiction, Astounding, Future, Orbit, Science Fiction Stories, Imagination, Amazing Stories, Rolling Stone College Papers and Playboy.

The Further Adventures of The Joker

The Further Adventures of The Joker (1990; Bantam Books, 457 pages) is an English paperback anthology of short fiction stories about Batman's archenemy the Joker. The material was written by various authors (see below), and the book was edited by Martin H. Greenberg. It was the follow-up to an earlier Batman anthology, The Further Adventures of Batman, and was followed by two later installments: The Further Adventures of Batman vol. 2 Featuring the Penguin and The Further Adventures of Batman vol. 3 Featuring Catwoman.

The stories in The Further Adventures of The Joker cover a wide range of topics and styles, with the title character, and his complicated relationship with the Batman, as the unifying theme; from tales of the Joker's childhood, to his current crimes, some of which Batman attempts to foil.

All of the works included in this anthology are considered to be "non-canonical", in relation to mainstream DC Comics continuity. Joe R. Lansdale's story "Belly Laugh, or The Joker's Trick or Treat" is notably a sequel to Lansdale's story from The Further Adventures of Batman.

The Science Fictional Olympics

The Science Fictional Olympics is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Isaac Asimov, Martin H. Greenberg and Charles G. Waugh as the second volume in their Isaac Asimov's Wonderful Worlds of Science Fiction series. It was first published in paperback by Signet/New American Library in June 1984. It has been translated into Italian in the series Urania.The book collects sixteen novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, with an introduction by Asimov.

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