Martin Frederick Ansel

Martin Frederick Ansel (December 12, 1850 – August 23, 1945) was the 89th Governor of South Carolina from 1907 to 1911.

Born in Charleston, South Carolina, to John Ansel who was an immigrant from Württemberg in Germany and Fredrika Bowers, also a German immigrant, Martin grew up in the German "colony" of Walhalla, South Carolina. He was admitted to the bar in 1870, first practicing law in Franklin, North Carolina, for four years, then in Greenville, South Carolina, where he became involved in politics. He served in the state legislature between 1882 and 1888, then was elected solicitor in the eighth Judicial Circuit, where he stayed until 1901.

He explored a run for governor in 1902, but did not actually run until 1906. He was re-elected in 1908.

He was first married to Ophelia Anne Speights, daughter of A.M. Speights, founder of The Greenville News, with whom he had two daughters and a son, but who died in 1894, then to Addie Hollingsworth Harris, who died in 1937. One of his daughters, Frederica, christened the battleship USS South Carolina (BB-26) in 1908. He served as an elder at First Presbyterian church of Greenville. He was interred in Springwood Cemetery in Greenville.

Martin Frederick Ansel
Martin Frederick Ansel
89th Governor of South Carolina
In office
January 15, 1907 – January 17, 1911
LieutenantThomas Gordon McLeod
Preceded byDuncan Clinch Heyward
Succeeded byColeman Livingston Blease
Member of the South Carolina House of Representatives from Greenville County
In office
November 28, 1882 – November 27, 1888
Personal details
Born
Martin Frederick Ansel

December 12, 1850
Charleston, South Carolina
DiedAugust 23, 1945 (aged 94)
Greenville, South Carolina
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Ophelia Anne Speights
Addie Hollingsworth Harris
Children3
ProfessionLawyer, politician

References

  • James Calvin Hemphill (1907). Men of Mark in South Carolina: Ideals of American Life: a Collection of Biographies of Leading Men of the State. Men of Mark Publishing Company. pp. 3–5. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
Political offices
Preceded by
Duncan Clinch Heyward
Governor of South Carolina
1907–1911
Succeeded by
Coleman L. Blease
1902 South Carolina gubernatorial election

The 1902 South Carolina gubernatorial election was held on November 4, 1902, to select the governor of the state of South Carolina. Duncan Clinch Heyward won the Democratic primary and ran unopposed in the general election to become the 88th governor of South Carolina.

1906 South Carolina gubernatorial election

The 1906 South Carolina gubernatorial election was held on November 6, 1906 to select the governor of the state of South Carolina, United States. Martin Frederick Ansel won the Democratic primary and ran unopposed in the general election to become the 89th governor of South Carolina.

1906 United States gubernatorial elections

United States gubernatorial elections were held in 1906, in 28 states, concurrent with the House and Senate elections, on November 6, 1906 (except in Arkansas, Georgia, Maine, Oregon and Vermont, which held early elections).

In Iowa, the gubernatorial election was held in an even-numbered year for the first time, having previously been held in odd-numbered years with the previous election taking place in 1903.

In Oregon, the gubernatorial election was held in June for the last time, moving to the same day as federal elections from the 1910 elections.

1907 in the United States

Events from the year 1907 in the United States.

1908 South Carolina gubernatorial election

The 1908 South Carolina gubernatorial election was held on November 3, 1908 to select the governor of the state of South Carolina. Governor Martin Frederick Ansel faced state senator Coleman Livingston Blease in the Democratic primary and emerged victorious to win a second two-year term as governor.

1908 United States gubernatorial elections

United States gubernatorial elections were held in 1908, in 33 states, concurrent with the House, Senate elections and presidential election, on November 3, 1908 (except in Arkansas, Georgia, Maine and Vermont, which held early elections).

In Ohio, the gubernatorial election was held in an even-numbered year for the first time, having previously been held in odd-numbered years with the previous election taking place in 1905.

1909 in the United States

Events from the year 1909 in the United States.

1910 United States gubernatorial elections

United States gubernatorial elections were held in 1910, in 31 states, concurrent with the House and Senate elections, on November 8, 1910 (except in Arkansas, Georgia, Maine and Vermont, which held early elections).

In Oregon, the gubernatorial election was held on the same day as federal elections for the first time, having previously been held in June.

1910 in the United States

Events from the year 1910 in the United States.

1911 in the United States

Events from the year 1911 in the United States.

Coleman Livingston Blease

Coleman Livingston Blease (October 8, 1868 – January 19, 1942) was a South Carolina politician who belonged to the Democratic Party. He served as a state legislator, 90th Governor of South Carolina (1910-1912), and U.S. Senator.

Blease was notorious for playing on the prejudices of poor whites to gain their votes. He was pro-lynching and anti-black education. As senator, he advocated penalties for interracial couples attempting to get married, as well as criticizing First Lady Lou Hoover for inviting a black guest to tea at the White House.

Duncan Clinch Heyward

Duncan Clinch Heyward (June 24, 1864 – January 23, 1943) was the 88th Governor of South Carolina from January 20, 1903, to January 15, 1907.

Heyward was born in Richland County to Edward Barnwell Heyward and Catherine Maria Clinch after his parents moved from Colleton County to avoid the Union Army during the Civil War. His parents moved back to Colleton County after the war, but Heyward lived with his grandmother when his parents died shortly thereafter. He attended the private schools of Charleston and went on to graduate from Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia, in 1885. Residing in Walterboro, Heyward resumed the growing of rice on the part of the plantation he inherited from his parents. He became a member of the Knights of Pythias and served as a captain of a cavalry company in Colleton County.

Announcing his candidacy in 1901 for the gubernatorial election of 1902, Heyward emerged as a frontrunner despite being a novice to politics. Ben Tillman did not have a favorite in the contest, but Heyward was an acceptable choice to him because Heyward favored the Dispensary. Heyward won in the runoff election against W. Jasper Talbert and became the 88th governor of South Carolina after running unopposed in the general election. He won a second term in 1904 and served as governor until his term expired in 1907.

Heyward was a virulent racist. Speaking at the Southern Conference on Quarantine and Immigration in 1906 argued for a vision of the American South that subjugated blacks saying, "The white race is the predominant race and the Negro must understand once and for all that the bounds of the social and political questions will be determined by the white man alone and by the white man's code."After leaving office, Heyward was appointed by President Woodrow Wilson in 1913 to be the Collector of Federal Internal Revenue Taxes for South Carolina.

Heyward wrote the book "Seed from Madagascar" in 1937. The book provides insight to the details of rice planting in the South Carolina lowcountry, and chronicles the decline of the rice planting industry and the prominent Heyward family.

Heyward died in Columbia, on January 23, 1943.

List of Governors of South Carolina

This is a list of South Carolina governors. The current governor of South Carolina is Henry McMaster who has been in office since January 24, 2017. South Carolina governors are counted only once; therefore, Joseph West, for instance, a colonial governor who served three non-consecutive terms, is considered the 2nd Governor of South Carolina, not the 2nd, 4th, and 7th.

Political party strength in South Carolina

The following table indicates the parties of elected officials in the U.S. state of South Carolina:

Governor

Lieutenant Governor

Secretary of State

Attorney General

State Treasurer

Comptroller General

Superintendent of Education

Adjutant General (no longer elected after 2014; appointed by governor beginning in 2019)

Commissioner of AgricultureThe table also indicates the historical party composition in the:

State Senate

State House of Representatives

State delegation to the U.S. Senate

State delegation to the U.S. House of Representatives

Richard S. Whaley

Richard Smith Whaley (July 15, 1874 – November 8, 1951) was a United States Representative from South Carolina and Chief Justice of the Court of Claims.

Springwood Cemetery

Springwood Cemetery is a historic cemetery in Greenville, South Carolina, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is the oldest municipal cemetery in the state and has approximately 7,700 marked, and 2,600 unmarked, graves.The first burial in what today is Springwood Cemetery occurred in July 1812, after Elizabeth Blackburn Williams (1752-1812), the mother-in-law of prominent early Greenvillian Chancellor Waddy Thompson, expressed a desire to be buried in the family garden. Many other burials occurred in the area after Thompson sold 60 acres of his property to one Francis H. McLeod in 1817. In 1829 McLeod opened the private graveyard to the public, and in 1833, he conveyed a tract of land to the city for use as a cemetery. The city acquired additional acres during the 1870s, and the last five acres of the cemetery were purchased before 1944. Presumably the cemetery was named for a spring that was once included in, or was just beyond, its boundaries.The 200-year-old cemetery includes "a comprehensive collection of gravemarker types," including field stones, raised masonry tombs topped with stone ledgers, Victorian monoliths, and Veterans Administration markers. Eighty unknown Confederate soldiers are buried near the entrance, presumably soldiers who died of wounds or disease after being removed to one of the two Greenville buildings used for hospitals during the Civil War.Springwood retains its rural cemetery design elements and the 1876 landscape planning of prominent New South architect G. L. Norrman. The entrance gate, built of Indiana limestone, was completed in 1914. Just outside the Main Street entrance, in its own pocket park, is a Confederate monument that from 1891 to 1923 stood in the middle of Main Street.The northeast corner of the cemetery, which was used as a potter's field for African Americans and indigent whites has perhaps only a dozen remaining headstones, although the area is believed to contain hundreds of graves. In 1969 the City of Greenville extended Academy Street through this section and removed the remains of approximately 250 to 275 people.Although burials continue, no new plots have been sold since the 1970s. The city of Greenville contributes to the maintenance of the cemetery, but there is no perpetual care fund, and the graves themselves remain private property. A "Friends of Springwood Cemetery" was formed in 2002 to raise awareness of cemetery needs.

Thomas Gordon McLeod

Thomas Gordon McLeod (December 17, 1868 – December 11, 1932) was the 95th Governor of South Carolina from 1923 to 1927.

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