Marquette Stadium

Marquette Stadium was an outdoor athletic stadium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the home field of the Golden Avalanche of Marquette University, its intercollegiate football team. Located in the Merrill Park neighborhood west of the university,[3] the stadium opened in 1924 and had a seating capacity of 24,000 at its peak.[1] Citing financial issues, the football program was discontinued by the university in December 1960.[4][5][6][7] The concrete grandstands were demolished in the summer of 1976.[1]

The National Football League's Green Bay Packers played several home games per year in the Milwaukee area for 62 seasons, from 1933 through 1994. Marquette Stadium hosted three games during the 1952 season; Packer games in Milwaukee were moved to nearby County Stadium when it opened in 1953.[8]

In addition to football, the stadium was also the home of the Marquette track and field team, which included Olympian Ralph Metcalfe, one of the fastest humans in the early 1930s. Olympic great Jesse Owens made several appearances while a collegian at Ohio State University.[9]

The site was refurbished in 1998 into the Quad Park track and soccer complex,[9] a home venue of Marquette University High School, a few blocks to the northeast. The current field and track are slightly west of the originals at Marquette Stadium.

Marquette Stadium
LocationN. 36th & W. Clybourn St.
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Coordinates43°02′10″N 87°57′40″W / 43.036°N 87.961°WCoordinates: 43°02′10″N 87°57′40″W / 43.036°N 87.961°W
OwnerMarquette University
OperatorMarquette University
Capacity24,000 [1]
SurfaceNatural grass
Construction
OpenedOctober 18, 1924 [2][1]
Demolished1976 [1]
Tenants
Marquette Golden Avalanche (NCAA)
(1924–1960)
Green Bay Packers (NFL)
(1952)
Milwaukee Panthers (NCAA Div. III)
(1973–1974)
Milwaukee  is located in the United States
Milwaukee 
Milwaukee 
Location in the United States
Milwaukee  is located in Wisconsin
Milwaukee 
Milwaukee 
Location in Wisconsin

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Cash, Phil (September 2, 1976). "MU Stadium gone, but the memories linger". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1-part 2.
  2. ^ "Marquette University Stadium Dedication". Marquette University. Raynor Memorial Libraries. October 18, 1924. Retrieved March 20, 2014.
  3. ^ Zeidler, Frank P. (January 26, 1989). "Zeidler fondly recalls Merrill Park". Milwaukee Journal. p. 1D.
  4. ^ "Save football, alumni aim". Milwaukee Journal. December 10, 1960. p. 14.
  5. ^ "Marquette drops football, track". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Associated Press. December 10, 1960. p. 10.
  6. ^ Bolchat, Rel (December 10, 1960). "MU drops football, basketball survives". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 3, part 2.
  7. ^ Riordon, Robert J (December 10, 1960). "'We want football!' MUers yell". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1, part 1.
  8. ^ "Other Homes of the Packers, 1919-94". Packers.com. Retrieved November 9, 2013.
  9. ^ a b Gardner, Charles F. (September 9, 1998). "Historic site gets boost". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. p. 10C.

External links

Preceded by
First
Home of
Marquette Golden Avalanche

1892-1960
Succeeded by
Last
Preceded by
State Fair Park
Milwaukee Home of the
Green Bay Packers

1952
Succeeded by
County Stadium
Preceded by
Shorewood Stadium
Home of
UW-Milwaukee Panthers

1973-1974
Succeeded by
Last
1930 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team

The 1930 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team represented Marquette University as an independent during the 1930 college football season. In its ninth season under head coach Frank Murray, the team compiled an undefeated 8–0–1 record, shut out eight of nine opponents, and outscored all opponents by a total of 155 to 7. The sole setback was a scoreless tie with Gus Dorais' Detroit Titans on November 15. Marquette played its home games at Marquette Stadium in Milwaukee.

Frank Murray was Marquette's head football coach for 19 years and was posthumously inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983.

1931 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team

The 1931 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team represented Marquette University as an independent during the 1931 college football season. In its 10th season under head coach Frank Murray, the team compiled an 8–1 record, shut out five of nine opponents, and outscored all opponents by a total of 172 to 25. The sole setback was a loss to Gus Dorais' Detroit Titans on October 16. Marquette played its home games at Marquette Stadium in Milwaukee.

Frank Murray was Marquette's head football coach for 19 years and was posthumously inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983.

1934 Detroit Titans football team

The 1934 Detroit Titans football team represented the University of Detroit in the 1934 college football season. Detroit outscored its opponents by a combined total of 112 to 59 and finished with a 5–3–1 record in its 10th year under head coach and College Football Hall of Fame inductee, Gus Dorais.

1936 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team

The 1936 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team represented Marquette University in the 1936 college football season. Marquette was led by long-time head coach Frank Murray. The team competed as a football independent and played their home games at Marquette Stadium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The squad finished the season with a 7–2 record after losing to TCU in the inaugural Cotton Bowl Classic.

1944 NCAA Track and Field Championships

The 1944 NCAA Track and Field Championships were contested at the 23rd annual NCAA-hosted track meet to determine the team and individual national champions of men's collegiate track and field events in the United States. This year's events were hosted by Marquette University at Marquette Stadium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.Illinois captured their third team championship (and first since 1927).

1945 NCAA Track and Field Championships

The 1945 NCAA Track and Field Championships were contested at the 24th annual NCAA-hosted track meet to determine the team and individual national champions of men's collegiate track and field events in the United States. For the second straight year, this meet events were hosted by Marquette University at Marquette Stadium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.Navy captured the team championship, their first title.

1947 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team

The 1947 Marquette Golden Avalanche football team was an American football team that represented Marquette University during the 1947 college football season. In its 17th season under head coach Frank Murray, the team compiled a 4–5 record and was outscored by a total of 223 to 185. The team played its home games at Marquette Stadium in Milwaukee.

1951 Green Bay Packers season

The 1951 Green Bay Packers season was their 33rd season overall and their 31st season in the National Football League. The club posted a 3–9 record under second-year coach Gene Ronzani for a fifth-place finish in the National Conference. The Packers lost the final seven games of the season.

The Packers played their Milwaukee home games in Wisconsin State Fair Park for the final time, a venue they had used since 1934. Marquette Stadium was used for one season in 1952 and the new County Stadium was the host venue from 1953 through 1994.

1952 Green Bay Packers season

The 1952 Green Bay Packers season was their 34th season overall and their 32nd season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–6 record under third-year head coach Gene Ronzani for a fourth-place finish in the National Conference in 1952. After climbing to a 6–3 record, the Packers lost their final three games, but the .500 record was their best since 1947.

The Packers played their Milwaukee home games in Marquette Stadium during this season only, after using Wisconsin State Fair Park from 1934 through 1951. The new County Stadium became the venue in 1953, and hosted the Milwaukee home games through 1994, when they were discontinued.

Head coach Ronzani was a Marquette University alumnus (1933) and won nine varsity letters in college.

1959 Pittsburgh Panthers football team

The 1959 Pittsburgh Panthers football team represented the University of Pittsburgh in the 1959 college football season. The team compiled a 6–4 record under head coach John Michelosen.

1973 Milwaukee Panthers football team

The 1973 Milwaukee Panthers football team represented the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee in the 1973 NCAA Division II football season. The Panthers offense scored 251 points while the defense allowed 218 points.

1974 Milwaukee Panthers football team

The 1974 Milwaukee Panthers football team represented the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee in the 1974 NCAA Division II football season. The Panthers offense scored 208 points while the defense allowed 170 points.

Ex Stasis (sculpture)

Ex Stasis is a public art work created by American artist Richard Lippold and located on the campus of Marquette University in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The abstract sculpture is a series of angular metallic planes set on a concrete pedestal. It is located near Marquette's Haggerty Museum of Art, but used to be the centerpiece of the west courtyard of the Alumni Memorial Union.

Jacques Marquette (sculpture)

Jacques Marquette is a public art work by artist Ronald Knepper. It is located on the campus of Marquette University west of downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

List of Green Bay Packers stadiums

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Since their establishment as a professional football team in 1919, the Packers have played home games in eight stadiums. Their first home was Hagemeister Park, where they played from 1919 to 1922, including their first two seasons in the National Football League (NFL). Hagemeister Park was a park owned by the Hagemeister Brewery. During games ropes were set-up around the field and attendees either walked up or parked their cars nearby. After the first season, a small grandstand was built and the field was fenced off. Green Bay East High School was built at the location of Hagemeister Park in 1922, which forced the Packers to move to Bellevue Park, a small minor league baseball stadium that seated about 5,000. They only played for two seasons at Bellevue Park before moving to City Stadium in 1925. Although City Stadium was the Packers' official home field, in 1933 they began to play some of their home games in Milwaukee to attract more fans and revenue. After hosting one game at Borchert Field in 1933, the Packers played two or three home games each year in Milwaukee, at Wisconsin State Fair Park from 1934 to 1951 and at Marquette Stadium in 1952. The games were moved to Milwaukee County Stadium after it opened in 1953 and continued through 1994, after which the Packers moved back to Green Bay permanently.As of 2018, the current home of the Green Bay Packers is Lambeau Field, an 81,435 seating capacity stadium in Green Bay, Wisconsin. By the 1950s, City Stadium was seen by the NFL as too small and outdated to host an NFL team. After threats of forcing the team to move to Milwaukee, the City of Green Bay built New City Stadium, which was funded by a voter-approved bond issue, in 1957. In April 1956, Green Bay voters overwhelmingly approved the bond issue to finance the new stadium. After the Packers founder Curly Lambeau died in 1965, the stadium was renamed to Lambeau Field in his honor. Its original capacity was 32,500 seats, although it was continually expanded from 1961 to 1995 to a capacity of 60,890 seats. The stadium was farther renovated from 2001 to 2003 to increase capacity to 72,515, while also updating various aspects of the stadium. Over 7,000 more seats were added to the south endzone in 2013 and the Lambeau Field Atrium was expanded in 2015. These renovations increased the stadium's capacity to 81,435, making it the third largest football stadium in America. Lambeau Field has been continuously ranked as one of the best stadiums in the NFL NFL. As of 2018, it is also the oldest continually operating NFL stadium, with the Packers having completed their 61st season. Only the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park and the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field have longer active home-field tenures in American professional sports.

Mother Teresa Monument

The Mother Teresa Monument is a public art work by artist Guatam Pal. It is located on the west side of the St. Joan of Arc Chapel on the Marquette University campus in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The sculpture depicts Mother Teresa dressed in a sari and holding an infant. The sculpture commemorates Mother Teresa's 1981 visit to Marquette, when she was awarded the Pere Marquette Discovery Award. The sculpture was dedicated on October 6, 2009 as part of a weeklong celebration of the "Centennial of Women at Marquette."

Rainbow Machine

Rainbow Machine is a public art work by American artist Joseph Burlini, formerly located on the campus of Marquette University in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Ruins X

Ruins X is a public art work created by American artist Ernest Carl Shaw and located at the Haggerty Museum of Art on the campus of Marquette University in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The abstract sculpture is part of a series of works in which the artist explores concepts of weight, balance, and order. It is located between Marquette's Haggerty Museum of Art and Helfaer Theatre.

Yakima Reds

Yakima Reds was an American soccer team based in Yakima, Washington, United States. Founded in 1995, the team played in the USL Premier Development League (PDL), the fourth tier of the American Soccer Pyramid, in the Northwest Division of the Western Conference. The franchise folded at the end of the 2010 season and left the league thereafter.

The team played its home games at Marquette Stadium. The team's colors were red and white.

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