Marqise Lee

Marqise Lee (born November 25, 1991) is an American football wide receiver for the Jacksonville Jaguars of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Jaguars in the second round of the 2014 NFL Draft. He played college football at USC, where he was the 2012 Biletnikoff Award winner as the nation's top receiver and a unanimous All-American.

Marqise Lee
refer to caption
Lee at 2014 Jacksonville Jaguars training camp
No. 11 – Jacksonville Jaguars
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:November 25, 1991 (age 27)
Long Beach, California
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:196 lb (89 kg)
Career information
High school:Junípero Serra
(Gardena, California)
College:USC
NFL Draft:2014 / Round: 2 / Pick: 39
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of 2018
Receptions:171
Receiving yards:2,166
Receiving touchdowns:8
Return yards:561
Return touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Both of Lee's parents, Elton Lee and Anfernee Williams, are deaf; he communicates with them via sign language.[1] Lee had a difficult childhood. His father was not regularly involved in his life. Lee spent the first twelve years of his life moving repeatedly between his mother and grandparents, both in low-income homes. The frequent moves forced him to repeat a grade early in elementary school. While Lee finished sixth grade, his grandfather died and his grandmother moved to the housing projects in Baldwin Village, Los Angeles; Lee and his younger sister chose not to move with her and instead became wards of the state. His two older brothers were involved in gangs: one, Terreal Reid, was murdered in a gang-related killing and the other, Donte Reid, was imprisoned in Arizona on a count of attempted murder. Lee previously tried to join the same gang, but his brothers prevented it. His sister still lives in the Los Angeles area.[2]

When Lee started high school at Morningside High School, in Inglewood, California, he was living in a foster home.[3] Lee played on an Amateur Athletic Union basketball team the summer after his freshman year of high school and became friends with Steven Hester Jr., a high school student from Inglewood attending the private Junípero Serra High School in Gardena, California. The Hester family liked Lee and, in September 2008, he moved in with them and began attending Serra. The family wanted to help Lee's younger sister, too, but were unable because of space and financial constraints. The Hesters became heavily involved in his life and continue to attend most of his games and practices at USC.[2]

At Serra High School, Lee was a year behind a stand-out wide receiver, Robert Woods, who also went to USC.[4] As a senior, Lee had had 57 receptions for 1,409 yards and 24 touchdowns as a wide receiver and 45 tackles and three interceptions as a defensive back. Lee was considered one of the top high school recruits in 2011.[5][6] A number of major NCAA Division I FBS college football programs offered him athletic scholarships and Lee made official visits to Florida, Miami, and Oregon before choosing to attend USC.[5]

Lee was also a sprinter and jumper for the Junípero Serra High School's track team. He set a personal-best leap of 13.59 meters in the triple jump at the 2010 CIF Division IV Meet. At the 2011 CIF Division IV Meet, he won the long jump with a leap of 7.52 meters, and recorded a career-best time of 10.74 seconds in the 100-meter dash, placing second.[7] His jump of 7.52 meters was ranked 2nd best among all the 2011 prep class.[8] He also ran the 200-meter dash in 22.11 seconds at the 2011 Del Rey League Championships, placing third in the finals.[9]

College career

While attending the University of Southern California, Lee played for the USC Trojans football team from 2011 to 2013.[10]

2011 season

As a true freshman at USC in 2011, he earned a starting job at wide receiver across from his former high school teammate Robert Woods.[11] He finished the season with 73 receptions for 1,143 yards and 11 touchdowns; due to sanctions, the 10-2 Trojans were prohibited from playing in either the inaugural Pac-12 Conference Championship game or a post-season bowl game.[12][13][14] The combined receptions by Lee and Woods (184) and receiving yards (2,435) in 2011 were the most by a pair of Trojans in a season; Lee was awarded the 2011 Pac-12 Freshman Offensive Co-Player of the Year and named to the All-Pac-12 second team.[15]

2012 season

Against Arizona in 2012, Lee set the Pac-12 Conference record for receiving yards in a game with 16 receptions for 345 yards and two touchdowns.[16] The following week, Lee had 251 return yards against Oregon, setting another conference record.[17] He finished the season with 118 catches for 1,721 yards and 14 touchdowns and was named the 2012 Pac-12 Conference offensive player of the year.[18][19] Lee won the 2012 Fred Biletnikoff Award as the top wide receiver in the nation, becoming the first Trojan to win the award.[20] He was also a unanimous All-American.[21][22]

2013 season

As a junior in 2013, Lee played in 11 games, recording 57 receptions for 791 yards and four touchdowns.[23] On January 3, 2014, Lee announced his decision to forgo his senior season and enter the 2014 NFL Draft.[24][25] During his three-year career with the Trojans, he had 248 receptions for 3,655 yards and 29 touchdowns.

Lee also competed on the USC track & field team in the spring, competing in the long jump and sprint relay.[26] He qualified for the NCAA championships in the long jump at the 2011 NCAA West preliminary rounds, setting a career-best leap of 7.76 meters.[27][28]

Professional career

External video
Marqise Lee NFL Combine Workout
Marqise Lee 40-yard dash
Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad BP
6 ft 0 in
(1.83 m)
192 lb
(87 kg)
31 14 in
(0.79 m)
9 12 in
(0.24 m)
4.52 s 1.57 s 2.50 s 4.01 s 6.96 s 38 in
(0.97 m)
10 ft 7 in
(3.23 m)
11 reps
All values from NFL Combine[29]

2014

The Jacksonville Jaguars selected Lee in the second round (39th overall) of the 2014 NFL Draft. He was one of three USC Trojans to be selected that year and was the first of two wide receivers the Jaguars selected, along with Allen Robinson (61st overall).[30]

External video
Jacksonville Jaguars select Marqise Lee

On June 16, 2014, the Jacksonville Jaguars signed Lee to a four-year, $5.14 million contract that includes $3.18 million guaranteed and a signing bonus of $2.08 million.[31]

Throughout training camp, Lee competed against Ace Sanders and Allen Robinson for the vacant starting wide receiver position that was left open after the suspension of Justin Blackmon.[32] During camp, he sustained a wrist injury and then suffered a leg injury.[33] Head coach Gus Bradley named Lee the starting wide receiver to start the regular season, alongside veteran Cecil Shorts.[34]

He made his professional regular season debut and first career start during the Jacksonville Jaguars' season-opener at the Philadelphia Eagles and caught a season-high six passes for 62-yards in their 34–17 loss.[35] The following week, he caught two passes for 14-yards, but left the Jaguars' 41–10 loss at the Washington Redskins in the second quarter after sustaining a hamstring injury that sidelined him for the next three games (Weeks 3-5).[36] On November 30, 2014, Lee caught six passes for a season-high 75-yards and caught his first career touchdown on a 30-yard pass from quarterback and fellow rookie Blake Bortles during the Jaguars' 25–24 loss to the New York Giants.[37] He finished his rookie season and only season under offensive coordinator Jedd Fisch with 37 receptions for 422 yards and one touchdown in 13 games and eight starts.[38]

2015

Lee competed against Allen Robinson and Allen Hurns for the vacant starting wide receiver position left by the departure of Cecil Shorts. He missed the majority of training camp after suffering a knee injury and then suffered a hamstring injury that allowed teammates to surpass him on the depth chart.[39][40] Offensive coordinator Greg Olson named Lee the fourth wide receiver on the depth chart to begin the regular season, behind Allen Robinson, Allen Hurns, and Bryan Walters.[41]

He was inactive for the Jacksonville Jaguars' season-opener against the Carolina Panthers due to his hamstring injury.[42] He went on to miss another five games (Weeks 4-9) after aggravating his hamstring injury.[43] On December 20, 2015, Lee caught two passes for 46-yards during the Jaguars' 23–17 loss to the Atlanta Falcons. The following week, he caught a season-high three passes for 26-yards and scored his only touchdown of the season in the Jaguars' 38–27 loss at the New Orleans Saints.[44] He finished with his second season with 15 receptions for 191 receiving yards and one touchdown in ten games and one start.[45]

2016

Lee entered training camp competing against Rashad Greene to be the Jaguars' third wide receiver on their depth chart.[46] Head coach Gus Bradley named him the third wide receiver to begin the regular season behind Allen Robinson and Hurns.[47]

In Week 7, Lee made a season-high seven receptions for 107-yards during a 33–16 loss against the Oakland Raiders.[48] Lee became one of the starting wide receivers for the remainder of the season after Allen Hurns suffered a hamstring injury that sidelined him for the last five games.[49] On December 11, 2016, he caught five passes for a career-high 113 receiving yards in a 25–16 loss to the Minnesota Vikings.[50] The following week, Lee returned a kickoff for a 100-yard touchdown as the Jaguars lost 21–20 at the Houston Texans. This marked his first career kick return for a touchdown.[51] On December 24, 2016, he threw for his first career touchdown pass on a trick play call after receiving the football on a sweep and threw a 20-yard touchdown pass to a wide-open Blake Bortles, his quarterback. He also caught three passes for 37-yards and scored a 21-yard touchdown during the Jaguars' 38–17 win against the Tennessee Titans.[52] He finished his last season under head coach Gus Bradley with 63 receptions for 851 receiving yards and three touchdowns in 16 games and six starts.[53] He also returned 18 kickoffs for 545-yards and a touchdown.[54]

2017

On January 9, 2017, the Jacksonville Jaguars announced that interim head coach and offensive line coach Doug Marrone would be promoted to their full-time head coach for the 2017 season.[55] Throughout training camp, Lee and Allen Hurns competed to be a starting wide receiver alongside Allen Robinson.[56] Offensive coordinator Nathaniel Hackett named Lee and Robinson the starting wide receivers to begin the season.[57] Hurns replaced Robinson in the lineup after he tore his ACL in the Jaguars' season-opening 29–7 victory at the Houston Texans.

In Week 2, Lee caught seven passes for a season-high 76 receiving yards during the Jaguars' 37–16 loss to the Tennessee Titans. On November 5, 2017, he caught a season-high eight passes for 75-yards and a touchdown in a 23–7 victory against the Cincinnati Bengals. In Week 15, he suffered an ankle injury and left during the second quarter of the Jagaurs' 45–7 routing against the Houston Texans. He was inactive for the next two games (Weeks 16-17) as head coach Doug Marrone opted to rest his starters for the Jaguars' upcoming playoff games.[58] Lee finished with 56 receptions for 702 yards and three touchdowns in 14 games and 14 starts.[59]

The Jacksonville Jaguars finished atop the AFC South with a 10–6 record and secured a playoff berth.[60] On January 7, 2018, Lee started his first career playoff game and had a five-yard rush and was only targeted once in the Jaguars' 10–3 victory over the Buffalo Bills in the AFC Wild Card Round.[61] The Jaguars defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers in the AFC Divisional round and went on to lose 24–20 to the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship. Lee had four receptions for 42-yards during the Jaguars' playoff loss.[62]

2018

On March 13, 2018, the Jaguars signed Lee to a four-year, $38 million contract extension.[31][63] On August 25, 2018, in the third preseason game, Lee suffered a severe knee injury and had to undergo season-ending surgery.[64]

Career statistics

Year Team Games Receiving
GP GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD
2014 JAX 13 8 37 422 11.4 37 1
2015 JAX 10 1 15 191 12.7 30 1
2016 JAX 16 6 63 851 13.5 51 3
2017 JAX 14 14 56 702 12.5 45 3
2018 JAX 0 0 Did not play due to injury
Total 53 29 171 2,166 12.7 51 8

See also

References

  1. ^ Pedro Moura, Aunt: Marqise Lee's father to attend first USC game, ESPNLosAngeles.com, November 8, 2012, accessed November 10, 2012.
  2. ^ a b Pedro Moura, The rise of Marqise Lee, ESPNLosAngeles.com, April 20, 2012, accessed November 10, 2012.
  3. ^ "How USC's Marqise Lee beat the odds". Orange County Register. April 13, 2012. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  4. ^ Klein, Gary (August 26, 2011). "USC is on the receiving end of Gardena Serra's work ethic". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  5. ^ a b Marqise Lee, Rivals.com, accessed December 7, 2012.
  6. ^ Marqise Lee, Scout.com, accessed December 7, 2012.
  7. ^ http://ca.milesplit.com/meets/94247/results/160111
  8. ^ http://www.usctrojans.com/sports/c-track/mtt/marqise_lee_793053.html
  9. ^ http://ca.milesplit.com/meets/94551/results/160498
  10. ^ "Marqise Lee College Stats". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  11. ^ Pedro Moura, Analyzing the season-opening depth chart, ESPNLosAngeles.com, August 29, 2011, accessed December 7, 2012.
  12. ^ "Marqise Lee 2011 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  13. ^ "2011 USC Trojans Schedule and Results". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  14. ^ Marqise Lee stats, ESPN.com, accessed December 7, 2012.
  15. ^ Marqise Lee bio, USCTrojans.com, accessed December 7, 2012.
  16. ^ Paul Myerberg, USC wide receiver Marqise Lee sets a Pac-12 record in loss, USA TODAY, October 27. 2012, accessed November 10, 2012.
  17. ^ Pedro Moura, USC starts Heisman campaign for Lee, ESPNLosAngeles.com, November 7. 2012, accessed November 10, 2012.
  18. ^ "Marqise Lee 2011 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  19. ^ Rich Hammond, USC’s Lee, Williams win Pac-12 football honors, 'Orange County Register', November 26, 2012.
  20. ^ Gary Klein, USC football: Marqise Lee wins Biletnikoff Award, Los Angeles Times, December 6, 2012, accessed December 6, 2012.
  21. ^ Walter Camp 123rd All-America Team Archived December 10, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, Walter Camp Foundation, December 6, 2012.
  22. ^ Richard Hammond, USC's Lee becomes unanimous All-American, Orange County Register, December 14, 2012.
  23. ^ "Marqise Lee 2013 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  24. ^ Marqise Lee to enter NFL draft
  25. ^ USC WR Marqise Lee to enter NFL Draft
  26. ^ Gary Klein, Marqise Lee making another big leap at USC, Los Angeles Times, March 27, 2012, accessed December 7, 2012.
  27. ^ http://articles.latimes.com/2012/may/24/sports/la-sp-sn-marqise-lee-qualifies-ncaa-championships--20120524
  28. ^ http://ca.milesplit.com/athletes/2470992-marqise-lee/feed#.VBerIvmSwrl
  29. ^ http://www.nfl.com/combine/profiles/marqise-lee?id=2543475
  30. ^ "2014 NFL Draft Listing". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved August 19, 2017.
  31. ^ a b "Spotrac.com: Marqise Lee contract". Spotrac.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  32. ^ Crowe, Alfie (May 29, 2014). "Jaguars wide receiver depth chart will be training camp battle". bigcatcountry.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  33. ^ Wells, Adam (August 13, 2014). "Marqise Lee Reportedly Avoided 'Serious' Leg Injury After Being Carted Off". bleacherreport.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  34. ^ "Ourlads.com: Jacksonville Jaguars' Depth Chart: 10/01/2014". Ourlads.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  35. ^ "Jacksonville Jaguars at Philadelphia Eagles - September 7th, 2014". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  36. ^ "Jaguars WR Marqise Lee out vs. Steelers with hamstring injury". SI.com. October 1, 2014. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  37. ^ "New York Giants at Jacksonville Jaguars - November 30th, 2014". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  38. ^ "Marqise Lee 2014 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  39. ^ Reier, Evan (July 15, 2015). "What Marqise Lee Injury Issues Mean for Jacksonville Jaguars in 2015". bleacherreport.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  40. ^ McCormick, Terry (August 5, 2015). "Receiver Marqise Lee suffers another injury in camp". 247sports.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  41. ^ "Ourlads.com: Jacksonville Jaguars' Depth Chart: 10/01/2015". Ourlads.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  42. ^ Smith, Bradley (September 15, 2015). "Panthers at Jaguars: Game Day Inactives List". catscratchreader.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  43. ^ "Jaguars taking extra time with Marqise Lee's injury". foxnews.com. November 3, 2015. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  44. ^ "NFL Player stats: Marqise Lee (2015)". NFL.com. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  45. ^ "Marqise Lee 2015 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  46. ^ DiRocco, Michael (November 10, 2016). "Remember when people wanted Jaguars WR Marqise Lee traded or cut?". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  47. ^ "Daily Fantasy Cafe: Jacksonville Jaguars' Depth Chart". dailyfantasycafe.com. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  48. ^ "Oakland Raiders at Jacksonville Jaguars - October 23rd, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  49. ^ Daniels, Tim. "Allen Hurns Injury: Updates on Jaguars WR's Hamstring and Return". bleacherreport.com. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  50. ^ "Minnesota Vikings at Jacksonville Jaguars - December 11th, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  51. ^ "NFL Game Center: Week 15-2016: Jacksonville Jaguars @ Houston Texans". NFL.com. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  52. ^ "Tennessee Titans at Jacksonville Jaguars - December 24th, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved August 19, 2017.
  53. ^ "Marqise Lee 2016 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  54. ^ "NFL Player stats: Marqise Lee (career)". NFL.com. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  55. ^ Rosenthal, Gregg (January 9, 2018). "Jaguars hire Doug Marrone to be new head coach". NFL.com. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  56. ^ Johnson, Jay (June 24, 2017). "Could Marqise Lee beat out Allen Hurns to be the Jags No. 2 WR?". jaguarswire.usatoday.com. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  57. ^ "Ourlads.com: Jacksonville Jaguars' Depth Chart: 09/01/2017". Ourlads.com. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  58. ^ Day, Ryan (December 17, 2017). "Jaguars injury news: Marqise Lee will be back for playoffs, if not before". bigcatcountry.com. Retrieved March 13, 2018.
  59. ^ "Marqise Lee 2017 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  60. ^ "2017 Jacksonville Jaguars Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  61. ^ "Wild Card - Buffalo Bills at Jacksonville Jaguars - January 7th, 2018". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  62. ^ "AFC Championship - Jacksonville Jaguars at New England Patriots - January 21st, 2018". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  63. ^ Patra, Kevin (March 13, 2018). "Staying in Duval: Jaguars re-signing Marqise Lee". NFL.com.
  64. ^ Patra, Kevin (August 27, 2018). "Marqise Lee will undergo season-ending knee surgery". NFL.com.

External links

2011 All-Pac-12 Conference football team

The 2011 All-Pac-12 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pac-12 Conference teams for the 2011 Pac-12 Conference football season. The Oregon Ducks won the conference, defeating the UCLA Bruins 49–31 in the Pac-12 Championship game. Oregon then beat the Big Ten champion Wisconsin Badgers in the Rose Bowl 45 to 38. Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck was voted Pac-12 Offensive Player of the Year. Cal linebacker Mychal Kendricks was voted Pat Tillman Pac-12 Defensive Player of the Year.

2011 USC Trojans football team

The 2011 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California in the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS college football season. The Trojans were led by head coach Lane Kiffin in his second season. They played their home games at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and are members of the South Division of the Pac-12 Conference. After a triple-overtime loss to Stanford, the Trojans won their last four games, including a 50–0 win over rival UCLA in the regular-season finale. USC ended their season ranked No. 6 in the AP Poll with a 10–2 record overall and finished first in the South Division with a 7–2 record in Pac-12 play. However, as part of a post-season ban mandated by the NCAA, the Trojans could not participate in the conference championship game or play in a bowl game. USC concluded their season with two thousand-yard receivers (Robert Woods and Marqise Lee), a thousand-yard rusher (Curtis McNeal), and a 3,000-yard passer (Matt Barkley) for the first time since the 2005 season, when Kiffin served as offensive coordinator.

2012 All-Pac-12 Conference football team

The 2012 All-Pac-12 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pac-12 Conference teams for the 2012 Pac-12 Conference football season. The Stanford Cardinal won the conference, defeating the UCLA Bruins 27–24 in the Pac-12 Championship game. Stanford then beat the Big Ten champion Wisconsin Badgers in the Rose Bowl 20 to 14. USC wide receiver Marqise Lee was voted Pac-12 Offensive Player of the Year. Arizona State defensive tackle Will Sutton was voted Pat Tillman Pac-12 Defensive Player of the Year.

2012 College Football All-America Team

The 2012 College Football All-America Team includes those players of American college football who have been honored by various selector organizations as the best players at their respective positions. The selector organizations award the "All-America" honor annually following the conclusion of the fall college football season. The original All-America team was the 1889 College Football All-America Team selected by Caspar Whitney and Walter Camp. In 1950, the National Collegiate Athletic Bureau, which is the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) service bureau, compiled the first list of All-Americans including first-team selections on teams created for a national audience that received national circulation with the intent of recognizing selections made from viewpoints that were nationwide. Since 1952, College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) has bestowed Academic All-American recognition on male and female athletes in Divisions I, II, and III of the NCAA as well as National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics athletes, covering all NCAA championship sports.

The 2012 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following College Football All-American first teams chosen by the following selector organizations: Associated Press (AP), Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), Walter Camp Foundation (WCFF), The Sporting News (TSN), Sports Illustrated (SI), Pro Football Weekly (PFW), ESPN, CBS Sports (CBS), College Football News (CFN), Scout.com, and Yahoo! Sports (Yahoo!).

Currently, the NCAA compiles consensus all-America teams in the sports of Division I-FBS football and Division I men's basketball using a point system computed from All-America teams named by coaches associations or media sources. The system consists of three points for a first-team honor, two points for second-team honor, and one point for third-team honor. Honorable mention and fourth team or lower recognitions are not accorded any points. Football consensus teams are compiled by position and the player accumulating the most points at each position is named first team consensus all-American. Currently, the NCAA recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, TSN, and the WCFF to determine Consensus All-Americans.In 2012, there were 13 unanimous All-Americans.

2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season

The 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season was the highest level of college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

The regular season began on August 30, 2012 and ended on December 8, 2012. The postseason concluded on January 7, 2013 with the BCS National Championship Game, where Alabama repeated as national champions by defeating Notre Dame.

Although Ohio State finished the regular season as the only undefeated team from an automatic-qualifying ("Power 5") BCS conference, they were ineligible to play in the postseason due to sanctions imposed earlier in the year.

2012 Oregon Ducks football team

The 2012 Oregon Ducks football team represented the University of Oregon in the 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team played their home games at Autzen Stadium for the 46th straight year, and was coached by Chip Kelly in his fourth and final year at Oregon. They are a member of the Pac-12 Conference in the North Division.

For the fifth straight season, Oregon swept all of their regional rivals in the Pac-12: Oregon State, Washington, and Washington State.

2012 Pac-12 Conference football season

The 2012 Pac-12 Conference football season began on August 30, 2012 with Northern Colorado at Utah. The conference's first game was played on September 15 with #2 USC at #21 Stanford, and the final game played was the Pac-12 Championship Game on November 30, 2012. This is the second season for the conference as a 12-team league. Pac-12 champion Stanford was featured in the Rose Bowl, a BCS bowl, when they prevailed 20–14 against Big Ten Champion Wisconsin on January 1, 2013.

2012 Sun Bowl

The 2012 Hyundai Sun Bowl, the 79th edition of the game, was a post-season American college football bowl game, held on December 31, 2012, at Sun Bowl Stadium in El Paso, Texas, as part of the 2012–13 NCAA Bowl season. The game, the 79th edition of the Sun Bowl, was televised in the United States on CBS.

The game featured the USC Trojans from the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12) against the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets from the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The Trojans accepted their invitation to the game after attaining a 7–5 regular-season record, while the Yellow Jackets entered the game with a 6–7 record (5-3 ACC), after losing to Florida State in the 2012 ACC Championship Game. Georgia Tech had to request for a postseason waiver that was granted in order to participate as a result of the conference championship game the Yellow Jackets played under extenuating circumstances caused by sanctions on the two teams ahead of them in division standings.Georgia Tech won the game in a 21–7 upset, thanks to a strong performance by the Yellow Jackets' defense. USC, which came into the game averaging more than 30 points per game, was limited to 7 points and 205 total yards. Georgia Tech cornerback Rod Sweeting was named the game's most valuable player.

2012 Syracuse Orange football team

The 2012 Syracuse Orange football team represented Syracuse University in the 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Orange were led by fourth year head coach Doug Marrone and played their home games at the Carrier Dome. The season marked their last as members of the Big East Conference, as they joined the Atlantic Coast Conference in 2013. They finished the season 8–5, 5–2 in Big East play to claim a four-way share of the Big East Conference championship. They were invited to the Pinstripe Bowl where they defeated long-time rival West Virginia, whom they did not play in the regular season due to the Mountaineers' move to the Big 12 Conference. The 2012 season also proved to be the final one for Marrone as the Orange head coach, as he was hired as the new head coach of the NFL's Buffalo Bills shortly after the end of the season.

2012 USC Trojans football team

The 2012 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California in the 2012 NCAA Division I FBS college football season. The Trojans were led by third-year head coach Lane Kiffin, played their home games at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, and were members of the South Division of the Pac-12 Conference. USC returned 18 starters and 13 All-Conference performers from a team that finished the 2011 season ranked No. 6 in the AP Poll with a 10–2 record overall, and finished first in the South Division with a 7–2 record in Pac-12 play. However, as part of a two-year-post-season ban mandated by the NCAA, the Trojans could not claim the 2011 Pac-12 South Division title, participate in the conference championship game or play in a bowl game. The 2012 season was the first year under Kiffin that the Trojans were eligible for post-season play. They started the season ranked #1 in the AP Poll, but finished unranked—the first team to do so since the 1964 Ole Miss Rebels and the first to do so in the BCS-era. The Trojans finished the season 7–6, 5–4 in Pac-12 play, tied for second in the Pac-12 South Division. They were invited to the Sun Bowl where they were defeated 21–7 by Georgia Tech.

2013 Fresno State Bulldogs football team

The 2013 Fresno State Bulldogs football team represented California State University, Fresno in the 2013 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Bulldogs were by second-year head coach Tim DeRuyter and played their home games at Bulldog Stadium. They were members of the Mountain West Conference in the West Division. They finished the season 11–2, 7–1 in Mountain West play to win the West Division. They defeated Utah State in the inaugural Mountain West Championship Game to be crowned Mountain West champions. They were invited to the Las Vegas Bowl where they were defeated by USC.

2013 Las Vegas Bowl

The 2013 Las Vegas Bowl was an American college football bowl game that was played on December 21, 2013, at Sam Boyd Stadium in Whitney, Nevada, in the Las Vegas Valley. The 22nd annual Las Vegas Bowl, it featured the Mountain West Conference champion Fresno State Bulldogs against the USC Trojans of the Pac-12 Conference. The game started at 12:30 p.m. PST and aired on ABC and Sports USA Radio. It was one of the 2013–14 bowl games that concluded the 2013 FBS football season. Sponsored by motor oil manufacturer Royal Purple, the game was officially known as the Royal Purple Las Vegas Bowl. The Trojans won by a score of 45–20.

2013 USC Trojans football team

The 2013 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California in the 2013 NCAA Division I FBS college football season. They played their home games at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, and were members of the South Division of the Pac-12 Conference. They finished the season 10–4, 6–3 in Pac-12 play to finish in a tie for second place in the South Division. They were invited to the Las Vegas Bowl where they defeated Fresno State.

Head coach Lane Kiffin, who was in his fourth year, was fired on September 29 after a 3–2 start to the season. He was replaced by interim head coach Ed Orgeron. At the end of the regular season, Washington head coach Steve Sarkisian was hired as the new head coach beginning in 2014. This prompted Orgeron to resign before the bowl game. Clay Helton led the Trojans in the Las Vegas Bowl.

2014 Jacksonville Jaguars season

The 2014 Jacksonville Jaguars season was the franchise's 20th season in the National Football League and the second under head coach Gus Bradley. They failed to improve upon their 4–12 record from 2013 and finished 3–13, and finished third in the AFC South for the second straight year. The Jaguars were eliminated from postseason contention after their week 12 loss to the Colts.In week 13, the Jaguars had their biggest comeback in franchise history, defeating the New York Giants 25–24. The Jaguars trailed 21–0 in the first half, but outscored the Giants 25–3 in the second half, with the help of two defensive touchdowns. The Jaguars did not win a single road game during the season, the second time such a thing happened in franchise history.

2019 Jacksonville Jaguars season

The 2019 season will be the Jacksonville Jaguars' upcoming 25th season in the National Football League and their third under head coach Doug Marrone.

After considering signing with teams such as the Miami Dolphins, New York Giants, and Washington Redskins, the Jaguars signed former Super Bowl MVP Nick Foles to a 4-year, $88 million contract on March 11, 2019. It will also be their first season since 2013 without Blake Bortles on the roster, as Bortles signed with the defending NFC Champion Los Angeles Rams via free agency on March 18, 2019. With the signing of Foles, the Jaguars will attempt to improve on their 5–11 record from last season and make the playoffs for the first time since 2017.

Dion Bailey

Dion Bailey (born March 2, 1992) is a former American football safety. He was signed by the Seattle Seahawks as an undrafted free agent in 2014. He played college football at USC.

Fred Biletnikoff Award

The Fred Biletnikoff Award is presented annually to the outstanding receiver in American college football by the Tallahassee Quarterback Club Foundation, Inc. (TQCF), an independent not-for-profit organization. The award was created by the Tallahassee Quarterback Club Foundation, Inc. in 1994. The award is named for Fred Biletnikoff, who played college football at Florida State University and professionally with the Oakland Raiders. Any NCAA Division I FBS player who catches the football through the forward pass is eligible to be selected as the award winner, although every winner since 1994 has been a wide receiver. A national selection committee consisting of over 540 journalists, commentators, broadcasters, and former players selects the award winner. No member of the board of trustees of the foundation has a vote.

Pac-12 Conference football individual awards

Coaches of the Pac-12 Conference bestow the following awards at the end of each football season. The conference was founded in its current form as the Athletic Association of Western Universities in 1959, but traces its roots to the Pacific Coast Conference, founded in 1915. The conference name changed to Pacific-8 Conference (Pac-8) in 1968 and Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) in 1978. The conference's 2011 expansion to 12 members saw the conference formally renamed as the Pac-12 Conference.

USC Trojans football statistical leaders

The USC Trojans football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the USC Trojans football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking/special teams. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Trojans represent the University of Southern California in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference.

Although USC began competing in intercollegiate football in 1888, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in the 1920s. Records from before this decade are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1920s, seasons have increased from to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

The Trojans have played in 55 bowl games in school history, 35 of which have come since the 1970 season. Although the official NCAA record book does not include bowl games in statistical records until 2002, and most colleges also structure their record books this way, USC counts all bowl games in its records.These lists are updated through the end of the 2017 season. Recent USC Football Media Guides do not include full top 10 lists for single-game records. However, the 2003 version of the media guide included long lists of top individual single-game performances, and box scores from more recent games are readily available, so the lists are easily derived.

Jacksonville Jaguars current roster
Active roster
Reserve lists

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