Mark Langston

Mark Edward Langston (born August 20, 1960) is an American former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. He pitched for the Seattle Mariners (1984–1989), Montreal Expos (1989), California and Anaheim Angels (1990–1997), San Diego Padres (1998), and Cleveland Indians (1999). During a 16-year baseball career, Langston compiled 179 wins, 2,464 strikeouts, and a 3.97 earned run average.

Mark Langston
Pitcher
Born: August 20, 1960 (age 58)
San Diego, California
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 7, 1984, for the Seattle Mariners
Last MLB appearance
September 24, 1999, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Win–loss record179–158
Earned run average3.97
Strikeouts2,464
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball career

Langston pitched collegiately at San Jose State and was drafted by Seattle Mariners in the second round of the 1981 Major League Baseball draft. Langston debuted for the Mariners in 1984 with fellow rookie Alvin Davis. Davis' performance won him the American League Rookie of the Year award, but Langston's performance was voted worthy of the Rookie Pitcher of the Year award, as he finished the year with a league leading 204 strikeouts.

In 1989, Langston was involved in the trade which sent him to Montreal and Randy Johnson to the Mariners.

In 1990, he pitched the first seven innings for a 2–0 combined no-hitter with Mike Witt. Witt, who had pitched a perfect game back in 1984, tossed the final two frames. This combined no-hitter remained the last one in Angels history until Ervin Santana pitched a no-hitter on July 27, 2011.[1]

Langston was the Angels starting pitcher for the 1995 American League West tie-breaker game. The Seattle Mariners defeated the California Angels to advance to the first regular American League Division Series.

In the 1998 World Series, Langston's 2–2 pitch to Tino Martinez appeared to be over the plate, but was called ball 3;[2] Langston's next pitch was hit for a grand slam in the seventh inning of Game 1 to give the New York Yankees a 9–5 lead. The Yankees went on to sweep the San Diego Padres in four games.

Noted for his pickoff move to first base, his 91 career pickoffs were, at the time of his retirement, the most in baseball history. Langston is one of only eight pitchers in MLB history to pickoff three runners in a single game which he accomplished against the Cubs in 1989. Today, he has the fourth-most pickoffs in baseball history, behind only Kenny Rogers, Terry Mulholland and Andy Pettitte, all of them also left-handed pitchers.

Broadcasting

Langston serves as a radio color commentator for the Los Angeles Angels during all games and is also a co-host of the Angels post-game call-in show Angel Talk on radio station KLAA.[3]

Personal life

Right after retirement Langston was the head coach for Lutheran High School of Orange County for 2 years. He lives in the Los Angeles area.

Langston appeared as himself in an episode of Sabrina, The Teenage Witch, entitled "To Tell a Mortal", where he plays catch with Harvey.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ http://vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/gallery/featured/GAL1137746/21/26/index.htm
  2. ^ Thanks To Rich, Martinez Gets His Pitch
  3. ^ AM 830 Angels Radio Broadcast Team Archived July 16, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0693161/

External links

1984 Seattle Mariners season

The Seattle Mariners 1984 season was their eighth since the franchise creation, and ended the season finishing 5th in the American League West with a record of 74–88 (.457).

1987 Major League Baseball season

The 1987 Major League Baseball season ended with the American League Champion Minnesota Twins winning the World Series over the National League Champion St. Louis Cardinals, four games to three, as all seven games were won by the home team.

Future Hall of Famer Ken Griffey, Jr. was selected with the #1 overall pick in the draft in June by the Seattle Mariners.

1987 Seattle Mariners season

The Seattle Mariners 1987 season was their 11th since the franchise creation, and ended the season finishing 4th in the American League West with a record of 78–84 (.481).

1988 Seattle Mariners season

The Seattle Mariners 1988 season was their 12th since the franchise creation, and ended the season finishing 7th in the American League West with a record of 68–93 (.422).

1989 Montreal Expos season

The 1989 Montreal Expos season was the 21st season of the baseball franchise. With owner Charles Bronfman thinking of selling the team he founded, he contemplated taking one last shot at a playoff berth. Bronfman gave young general manager Dave Dombrowski a clear mandate to win now, reportedly telling him he would provided all the money needed in the quest to bring a championship to Montreal in 1989. Dombrowski pulled off a massive trade on May 25, acquiring star left-handed pitcher – and pending free agent – Mark Langston from the Seattle Mariners. While the move was viewed as a coup at the time, it came at a heavy cost as a young, very tall and very raw Randy Johnson was the key part of the package going to the Pacific Northwest. Johnson would eventually harness his fantastic stuff and became one of the game's most dominant left-handed pitchers for well over a decade. Langston pitched 4 months for the club and left as a free agent. Still, it seemed like a worthy gamble at the time for the Expos. That year, there was no dominant team in the National League. The team seemed poised to compete for the NL East crown with a loaded starting pitching staff that featured Langston, Dennis Martínez, Bryn Smith, Pascual Perez and Kevin Gross.

The team peaked on August 2 with an NL best record of 63-44, holding a 3-game lead in the NL East and everything running along smoothly. What followed would go down as the greatest collapse in franchise history. The next night, a Benny Distefano pinch hit single in the 12th inning dealt the Expos a 1-0 loss in Pittsburgh. It was the start of a 7-game losing streak. The club limped through the rest of August but remained in the race in early September, with the team being only 2 games back of 1st place on September 6. Regardless, the downward spiral continued as the Expos inexplicably ended up losing 37 of their final 55 games to finish the season a disappointing 81-81, well out of the playoff picture. The easiest analysis of what caused the collapse is to point to the offence, which struggled after August 2, scoring an MLB worst 3.23 runs per game. For long-time Expos fans, the collapse is viewed as the beginning of the end of the franchise. If the club had won the NL East title that year and then beaten the Giants in the NLCS, clinching a World Series berth in the process, Bronfman may have changed his mind about selling the team. Instead, the late season collapse after such a big win now move only added to the owner's frustration.

1989 Seattle Mariners season

The Seattle Mariners 1989 season was their 13th since the franchise creation, and ended the season finishing 6th in the American League West, finishing with a record of 73–89 (.451). The season, however, was enlivened by the arrival of the first overall pick of the 1987 draft, nineteen-year-old Ken Griffey, Jr.

1990 Major League Baseball draft

The 1990 Major League Baseball (MLB) Draft was held in June 1990. The draft placed amateur baseball players onto major league teams. 1,487 players were distributed to 26 teams. The draft consisted of first round selections, supplemental first round selections, compensation picks, and many more rounds, in fact, it went a record 101 rounds with 40 first round selections. With a league-worst record of 63 wins and 97 losses in the 1989 MLB Season, the Atlanta Braves selected shortstop, Chipper Jones out of the Bolles School with the first pick of the draft. 9 NBA and NFL players were drafted in 1990. 7 of the first 10 picks were selected directly out of high school.

1993 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1993 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 64th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 13, 1993, at Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore, Maryland, the home of the Baltimore Orioles of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 9-3.

This is also the last Major League Baseball All-Star Game to date to be televised by CBS.

1995 California Angels season

The California Angels' 1995 season featured the Angels finishing in second place in the American League West with a record of 78 wins and 67 losses.

The 1995 Angels went through statistically the worst late-season collapse in Major League Baseball history. On August 16, they held a 10½-game lead over the Texas Rangers and an 11½-game lead over the Seattle Mariners, but suffered through a late season slump, including a nine-game losing streak from August 25 to September 3. They were still atop the division, leading Seattle by six games and Texas by 7½, when a second nine-game losing streak from September 13 to 23 dropped them out of first place. The Angels rebounded to win the last five scheduled games to tie Seattle for the division lead, forcing a one-game playoff to determine the division champion. Mariners ace Randy Johnson led his team to a 9–1 triumph over Angel hurler Mark Langston in the tiebreaker game, ending the Angels' season. It was the closest the Angels would come to reaching the postseason between 1986 and 2002.

Brian Holman

Brian Scott Holman (born January 25, 1965) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher.

Holman's brother Brad Holman and stepfather Dick LeMay also were Major League pitchers.

Ed Vande Berg

Edward John Vande Berg (born October 26, 1958) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. He is an alumnus of Redlands High School and Arizona State University. Drafted by the Seattle Mariners in the 13th round of the 1980 MLB amateur draft, Vande Berg would make his Major League Baseball debut with the Seattle Mariners on April 7, 1982, and appear in his final game on September 30, 1988.In 1982, his rookie season, he led the major leagues in appearances with 78 and became the first of three straight Mariners to win the A.L. Rookie Pitcher of the year (Matt Young, 1983 and Mark Langston, 1984).

List of Gold Glove Award winners at pitcher

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007 and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Greg Maddux has won the most Gold Glove Awards among all players, including pitchers, in Major League Baseball history. He won 18 awards, all in the National League; his streak of wins was consecutive from 1990 through 2002 until interrupted by Mike Hampton in 2003. Maddux won five more awards from 2004 to 2008, after which he retired. Jim Kaat is second and held the record for most wins (16) until he was displaced by Maddux in 2007. He won 14 awards in the American League and 2 in the National League; his 16 consecutive awards is a record among winners. Bob Gibson won nine Gold Gloves with the St. Louis Cardinals, and the inaugural winner Bobby Shantz won four awards in each league, for a total of eight. Mark Langston and Mike Mussina are tied for the fifth-highest total, with seven wins each. Five-time awardees include Ron Guidry, Phil Niekro, and Kenny Rogers; Jim Palmer won four times. Gold Glove winners at pitcher who have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame include Gibson, Palmer, and Niekro.Maddux made the most putouts in a season (39) three times in his career (1990, 1991, and 1993). The American League leader is Frank Lary, who made 32 putouts for the Detroit Tigers in 1961. Kaat is the leader in assists; he made 72 with the Minnesota Twins in 1962. The National League leader, Maddux, trails him by one (71 assists in 1996). Many pitchers have posted errorless seasons and 1.000 fielding percentages in their winning seasons; Mussina is the leader with four perfect seasons in the field. Guidry (1982–1984) and Mussina (1996–1998) both accomplished the feat in three consecutive seasons. The most double plays turned by a winning pitcher is nine, accomplished by Maddux in 2006. Four pitchers have also thrown no wild pitches in a winning season: Maddux (1997, 2006), Kaat (1975), Shantz (1961, 1962), and Rogers (2005). In contrast, the most wild pitches in a winning season is 18, by the knuckleballing Niekro. The fewest balks in a winning season is zero, achieved many times, but Maddux accomplished the feat the most time in his wins (12 balk-free seasons in 18 years). The most balks in a winning season is five, by Mike Norris in 1981 and Orel Hershiser in 1988. Langston picked off the most runners from the pitcher's mound in a winning season, with 10 in 1993; four pitchers are tied for the National League lead with 5 pickoffs. Rogers posted both the highest (100% in 2002) and lowest (0% in 2005) caught stealing percentage in a winning season. Shantz' 1961 season tied Rogers' 0% mark for lowest percentage caught, and three pitchers are tied for the National League lead (67% caught).

List of Los Angeles Angels Opening Day starting pitchers

The Los Angeles Angels are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Anaheim, California. They play in the American League West division. The franchise has also gone by the names "Los Angeles Angels", "California Angels" and "Anaheim Angels" at various points in its history. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Angels have used 25 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 51 seasons. The 25 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 26 wins, 18 losses and 7 no decisions. No decisions are awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game. It can also result if a starting pitcher does not pitch five full innings, even if his team retains the lead and wins.Jered Weaver has the most Opening Day starts for the Angels, with seven, and had 6 consecutive opening day starts from 2010-2015. He has a record of three wins and two losses, with one no decision in those starts that resulted in a win. Mike Witt has the second most starts, with five, with one win, three loses, and one no decision that resulted in a loss. Frank Tanana, Mark Langston and Chuck Finley have all made four Opening Day starts for the Angels. Hall of Famer Nolan Ryan, Bartolo Colón and Jered Weaver have each made three such starts for the Angels.Nolan Ryan has the Angels record for most wins in Opening Day starts with three. He also has the best win–loss record in Opening Day starts for the Angels, which is 3–0. The other Angels pitchers with multiple wins in Opening Day starts without a loss are Ken McBride and Andy Messersmith. Mike Witt has the record for most losses in Opening Day starts for the Angels with three. Frank Tanana and Chuck Finley each had two such losses.The Angels have played in three home ball parks. They played their first season in Wrigley Field, which was designed to look like Wrigley Field in Chicago, but never played an Opening Day home game there. In 1962, they moved to Dodger Stadium, but only stayed there through 1965. They played two Opening Day games at Dodger Stadium, winning once and losing once. The Angels finally moved to Angel Stadium of Anaheim in 1966, which was first called Anaheim Stadium, then subsequently renamed Edison International Field of Anaheim later. They have played 29 Opening Day games there, and their starting pitchers have 15 wins and 12 losses with 2 no decisions. This makes their record at home in Opening Day games 15 wins and 13 losses with 2 no decisions. In Opening Day games on the road, their starting pitchers have a record of 10 wins and 5 losses with 5 no decisions.The Angels have played in one World Series championship in their history, which they won in 2002. Jarrod Washburn was the Angels Opening Day starting pitcher that season. The Angels lost that Opening Day game to the Cleveland Indians. The winning pitcher for the Indians in that game was Bartolo Colón, who would make three Opening Day starts for the Angels later in his career.

List of Seattle Mariners Opening Day starting pitchers

The Seattle Mariners are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Seattle, Washington. They play in the American League West division. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Mariners have used 15 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 41 seasons. The 15 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 15 wins, 13 losses (15–13) and 13 no decisions. No decisions are only awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game.

Félix Hernández has the Mariners' record for most Opening Day starts with ten, recording a record of 6–2. Randy Johnson has the most starts in the former home ballpark of the Mariners, the Kingdome, compiling an Opening Day record of 2–0 in 6 starts. Jamie Moyer has the most starts in Safeco Field, the Mariners' current home ballpark, and has an Opening Day record of 1–2. Mark Langston has the worst winning percentage as the Opening Day starting pitcher with a record of 0–3, all of which were pitched on the road.Overall, the Mariners have a record of 6–4 at the Kingdome on Opening Day, compared to a 2–3 record at Safeco Field, making their combined home record 8–7, and their away record 3–4. The Mariners went on to play in the American League Division Series (ALDS) playoff games in 1995, 1997, 2000, and 2001. Randy Johnson, Jeff Fassero and Freddy García were the Opening Day starting pitchers those years, and had a combined Opening Day record of 2–0.

List of Seattle Mariners team records

The Seattle Mariners are a Major League Baseball (MLB) team who have participated in 36 seasons since their inception in 1977. Through 2012, they have played 5,707 games, winning 2,664, losing 3,043, and tying two, for a winning percentage of .467. This list documents the superlative records and accomplishments of team members during their tenures as Seattle Mariners in Major League Baseball's American League West.

Ichiro Suzuki holds the most franchise records as of the end of the 2012 season, with ten, including best single-season batting average, most career hits, and most career triples. He is followed by Edgar Martínez, who holds nine records, including best career on-base percentage and the single-season walk record.Two Mariners players currently hold Major League Baseball records. Ichiro holds the record for most single-season hits and singles, obtaining both in 2004. Mike Cameron is tied with 14 others for the most home runs in a game, with four. Additionally, Gene Walter, a Mariner for the 1988 season, is tied for the American League lead in balks for a single game, which he achieved on July 18 in a game against the Detroit Tigers.

Mike Campbell (pitcher)

Michael Thomas Campbell (born February 17, 1964) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He was picked in the first round (7th overall) by the Seattle Mariners in the 1985 Major League Baseball Draft, out of the University of Hawaii. He attended West Seattle High School and Newport High School in Bellevue Wa. Campbell was named Pacific Coast League Most Valuable Player in 1987 while coming up through the Mariners system with the Calgary Cannons before his MLB debut that same year.

After making his major league debut on July 4, 1987, Campbell was in and out of the Mariners rotation from 1987 to 1989. During the 1989 season he was traded to the Montreal Expos along with Mark Langston in a 5 player deal in which the Mariners received Randy Johnson, Brian Holman and Gene Harris. Campbell also played in the big leagues with the Texas Rangers, San Diego Padres and Chicago Cubs.

Chronic shoulder injuries slowly forced him out of the game. He played for the Yokohama BayStars in 1997 but had his season cut short by a serious ankle injury that required reconstructive surgery. He retired permanently from baseball in 1999 after a stint in the independent Atlantic League.

Mike Witt

Michael Atwater Witt (born July 20, 1960) is a former professional baseball pitcher. He played all or part of twelve seasons in Major League Baseball between 1981 and 1993, and threw the eleventh perfect game in MLB history in 1984.

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

Seattle Mariners award winners and league leaders

The following is a list of Seattle Mariners professional baseball players and managers who have won various awards or other accolades from Major League Baseball or other organizations or have led the American League in some statistical category at the end of the season.

Accomplishments
Preceded by
Ron Guidry
Mike Boddicker
American League Gold Glove Award (P)
1987–1988
1991–1995
Succeeded by
Bret Saberhagen
Mike Mussina
Preceded by
Mike Moore
Opening Day starting pitcher
for the Seattle Mariners

1987–1989
Succeeded by
Brian Holman
Preceded by
Tom Browning
No-hit game
April 11, 1990
(with Mike Witt)
Succeeded by
Randy Johnson
Preceded by
Kevin Brown
American League All-Star Game Starting Pitcher
1993
Succeeded by
Jimmy Key

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