Mark Herrmann

Mark Donald Herrmann (born January 8, 1959) is a former American college and professional football player who was a quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for twelve seasons during the 1980s and 1990s. Herrmann played college football for Purdue University, and was recognized as an All-American. He subsequently played professionally for five different NFL teams. After retiring as a player, he became the Associate Director of Educational Programs for the NCAA, and currently works as a broadcaster for local football after serving on the Indianapolis Colts broadcast crew for nearly a decade.

Mark Herrmann
No. 9
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:January 8, 1959 (age 60)
Cincinnati, Ohio
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:184 lb (83 kg)
Career information
High school:Carmel (Carmel, Indiana)
College:Purdue
NFL Draft:1981 / Round: 4 / Pick: 15
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Pass attempts:569
Pass completions:334
Percentage:56.2
TDINT:16–36
Passing Yards:4,015
QB Rating:64.3
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Herrmann was born in Cincinnati and raised in Carmel, Indiana, where he played high school football for Carmel High School. He also played on Carmel's state championship basketball team in 1977.

College career

Herrmann attended Purdue University, where he played for coach Jim Young's Purdue Boilermakers football team from 1977 to 1980. Herrmann had an impressive college career; in 1980 he was recognized as a consensus first-team All-American, he was selected as the Big Ten Conference's Most Valuable Player, and he finished fourth in voting for the Heisman Trophy. His 9,946 career passing yards set an NCAA record (which has since been broken). He is one of only three Purdue quarterbacks to start in three consecutive bowl games (Drew Brees did the same, and Kyle Orton started four straight). Herrmann won all three of his bowl games, and was selected Most Valuable Player in each of them: the 1978 Peach Bowl, the 1979 Bluebonnet Bowl, and the 1980 Liberty Bowl. He also holds the Liberty Bowl record for passing touchdowns.

  • 1977: 2,453 yards with 18 TD vs 27 INT in 11 games.
  • 1978: 1,904 yards with 14 TD vs 12 INT in 11 games.
  • 1979: 2,377 yards with 16 TD vs 19 INT in 11 games.
  • 1980: 3,212 yards with 23 TD vs 17 INT in 11 games. Also won the Sammy Baugh Trophy.

He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in May 2010.

Professional career

Herrmann was drafted by the Denver Broncos in 1981, but did not play in his first year out of college. In 1982, he appeared in two games, but at the end of the season he was traded to the Baltimore Colts as part of the deal that brought John Elway to Denver. In 1983–84 Herrmann saw limited action with the Colts, first at Baltimore and then at Indianapolis. In 1985, he was traded to the San Diego Chargers, where he played for three seasons and performed well as the backup to Dan Fouts. Herrmann then played for the Los Angeles Rams in 1988–89, and returned to the Colts for three seasons before retiring in 1992.

Herrmann appeared in just 40 games during his 11-year pro career, completing 334 passes in 561 attempts (59.5%) for a total of 4,015 yards. He threw 16 touchdown passes and was intercepted 36 times.

Personal life

Herrmann lives in Indianapolis with his wife Susie. He has three children.

1977 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 1977 Purdue Boilermakers football team represented Purdue University in the 1977 Big Ten Conference football season.

1978 Peach Bowl

The 1978 Peach Bowl was a college football postseason bowl game between the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets and the Purdue Boilermakers.

1978 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 1978 Purdue Boilermakers football team represented Purdue University in the 1978 Big Ten Conference football season.

1979 Astro-Bluebonnet Bowl

The 1979 Astro-Bluebonnet Bowl was a college football postseason game between the Purdue Boilermakers and the Tennessee Volunteers.

1979 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 1979 Purdue Boilermakers football team represented Purdue University in the 1979 Big Ten Conference football season.

1980 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1980 Big Ten Conference football season was the 85th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season.

The 1980 Big Ten champion was Michigan. The Wolverines lost two of their first three games but went undefeated thereafter, culminating in a 23–6 victory over the Washington Huskies in the 1981 Rose Bowl (the program's first bowl victory under head coach Bo Schembechler). Michigan was ranked No. 4 in the final AP Poll, led the Big Ten in scoring defense (10.8 points per game), and did not allow a touchdown in the final 22 quarters of the season. Schembechler was selected as the Big Ten Coach of the Year.

The Ohio State Buckeyes started the season ranked No. 1 in the AP Poll, but finished the season ranked No. 15 after compiling a 9–3 record and losing to Penn State in the 1980 Fiesta Bowl. The Buckeyes led the conference in scoring offense with 32.3 points per game.

The Purdue Boilermakers finished the season tied with Ohio State for second place in the conference and were ranked No. 17 in the final AP Poll. During the 1980 season, Purdue quarterback Mark Herrmann became the first player in college football history to compile more than 9,000 career passing yards. Hermann also won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the most valuable player in the conference.

Mark Hermann and Purdue teammate Dave Young, a tight end, were the only two Big Ten players to be recognized as consensus first-team players on the 1980 College Football All-America Team. The conference's statistical leaders included Hermann with 3,212 passing yards, Ohio State's Calvin Murray with 1,267 rushing yards, and Ohio State placekicker Vlade Janakievski with 90 points scored. Michigan linebacker Mel Owens was the only Big Ten player selected in the first round of the 1981 NFL Draft, going to the Los Angeles Rams with the ninth pick.

1980 Liberty Bowl

The 1980 Liberty Bowl was a college football post-season bowl game between the Purdue Boilermakers and the Missouri Tigers.

1980 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 1980 Purdue Boilermakers football team was an American football team that represented Purdue University during the 1980 Big Ten Conference football season. In their fourth season under head coach Jim Young, the Boilermakers finished in a tie for second place in the Big Ten Conference (Big Ten), compiled a 9–3 (7–1 against Big Ten opponents), defeated Missouri in the Liberty Bowl, were ranked No. 16 in the final AP Poll, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 328 to 233. The team played its home games at Ross–Ade Stadium in West Lafayette, Indiana.

Quarterback Mark Hermann gained national attention for breaking the NCAA's career record for passing yardage. He finished his collegiate career having completed 772 of 1,309 passes for 9,946 yards, 71 touchdowns, and 75 interceptions. Hermann and teammate Dave Young, a tight end, were the only two Big Ten players to be recognized as consensus first-team players on the 1980 College Football All-America Team. Hermann also won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the most valuable player in the Big Ten Conference.

Several Purdue players ranked among the Big Ten leaders in various statistical categories, including the following:

Mark Hermann led the Big Ten Conference with 3,212 passing yards, a 65.8 pass completion percentage, 23 passing touchdowns, 8.7 yards per passing attempt, a 150.5 pass efficiency rating, and 3,026 passing yards.

Dave Young led the Big Ten with 70 receptions and ranked second in the Big Ten with nine receiving touchdowns and third with 959 receiving yards.

Rick Anderson led the Big Ten with 16 field goals made and a 69.6 field goal percentage and ranked second with 86 points scored.

Jimmy Smith ranked sixth in the Big Ten with 269 kickoff return yards, seventh with seven rushing touchdowns, eighth with 54 points scored, ninth with 19.2 yards per kickoff return, and 10th with 657 rushing yards, 139 rushing attempts, and 160 plays from scrimmage.

Bart Burrell ranked second in the Big Ten with 66 receptions and 1,001 receiving yards

Steve Bryant ranked fifth in the Big Ten with 50 receptions, fourth in the Big Ten with 892 receiving yards, and third in the Big Ten with 17.8 yards per reception.

Robert Williams tied for the Big Ten lead with five interceptions.

Bill Kay led the Big Ten with 104 interception return yards.

Scott Craig ranked fifth in the Big Ten with 122 punt return yards and seventh with 4.5 yards per punt return.

1985 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1985 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 16th season in the National Football League and the 26th overall.

The Chiefs got off to a great start in 1985 with a 47–27 win at New Orleans, while safety Deron Cherry tied an NFL record by registering four interceptions in a 28–7 win against Seattle on September 29 as the club boasted a 3–1 record four games into the season. The club was then confronted with a seven-game losing streak (amidst, nonetheless, the neighboring Kansas City Royals's World Series run) that wasn’t snapped until quarterback Todd Blackledge was installed as the starter against Indianapolis on November 24. The team rebounded to win three of its final five contests of the year with Blackledge under center, further inflaming a quarterback controversy that continued into the 1986 season.Among these wins was the first time since 1972 that the Chiefs played the Atlanta Falcons, and merely the second in team history. The reason for this is that before the admission of the Texans in 2002, NFL scheduling formulas for games outside a team's division were much more influenced by table position during the previous season.One of the few remaining bright spots in a disappointing 6–10 season came in the regular season finale against San Diego when wide receiver Stephone Paige set an NFL record with 309 receiving yards in a 38–34 win, breaking the previous mark of 303 yards set by Cleveland's Jim Benton in 1945. Paige's mark was subsequently surpassed by a 336-yard effort by Flipper Anderson (Los Angeles Rams) in 1989.

2000 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 2000 Purdue Boilermakers football team represented Purdue University in the 2000 NCAA Division I-A football season. They played their home games at Ross–Ade Stadium in West Lafayette, Indiana and competed in the Big Ten Conference. In its fourth year under head coach Joe Tiller, Purdue compiled an 8–4 record, won the conference championship, but was defeated by Washington in the 2001 Rose Bowl.

Purdue's offense was led by quarterback and Heisman Trophy-finalist Drew Brees. Brees led the Big Ten in completions, attempts, passing yards and passing touchdowns, setting the Big Ten career record for career passing yards with 11,517 passing former Purdue player, Mark Herrmann who had set the mark with 9,946 in 1980. The team had neither a 1,000-yard rusher nor a 1,000-yard receiver. Vinny Sutherland was the leading receiver with 926 receiving yards, and Montrell Lowe led the team in rushing with 919 rushing yards. Drew Brees and Offensive Tackle Matt Light were the only players on the offensive unit selected as an All-American, being selected by Pro Football Weekly.

On defense, the 2000 Purdue team had true freshman safety Stuart Schweigert, who intercepted five passes and also lead the team in tackles with 85. Other standouts on defense included defensive end Akin Ayodele with 9.0 quarterback sacks, and linebacker Landon Johnson with 71 tackles and two sacks, and safety Ralph Turner with 65 tackles, four sacks and an interception.

Ten members of the team were honored as All-Big Ten Conference selections, quarterback Drew Brees was named the Big Ten Offensive of the Year and the Chicago Tribune Silver Football, while safety Stuart Schweigert was named the Big Ten Freshman of the Year. Nineteen members of the 2000 Boilermakers football team went on to play in the NFL. Prior to 2000, the Boilermakers had compiled three consecutive winning seasons and had not won a Big Ten Championship since the 1966 Purdue team.

The 2000 team, which boasted two future Super Bowl winners, was featured in the 2013 Big Ten Network documentary series Big Ten Elite and is still widely regarded by Purdue fans as one of the greatest Boilermakers football teams of all time. The Boilermakers have yet to win the Big Ten championship or reach the Rose Bowl since then.

Gene Swick

Gene Swick (born c. 1955) is an American former football player. He played college football as a quarterback for the University of Toledo from 1972 to 1975, and the Cleveland Browns selected Swick in the fourth round of the 1976 NFL Draft, but subsequently waived him during camp. In 1975, he set the NCAA Division I record with 8,074 career yards, which broke the previous record held by Jim Plunkett of Stanford and stood until surpassed by Mark Herrmann of Purdue in 1980.

List of Denver Broncos starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the team.

List of Indianapolis Colts broadcasters

The Colts' flagship station from 1984-1998 and again starting in the 2007 season is WIBC 1070AM (renamed WFNI as of December 26, 2007); under the new contract, games are simulcast on WLHK 97.1 FM. From 1998 through 2006, the Colts' flagship station was WFBQ 94.7FM (with additional programming on WNDE 1260AM). Matt Taylor is the team's play-by-play announcer, holding that title since 2018 following Bob Lamey's retirement. Former Colts quarterback Jim Sorgi serves as color commentator. Mike Jansen serves as the public address announcer at all Colts home games. Mike has been the public address announcer since the 1998 season.

Preseason games not shown on national television are seen locally on WTTV-4, "Indiana's 4." Colts radio sideline reporter Matt Taylor provides play-by-play with former Colts defensive coordinator Rick Venturi as analyst. Regular-season Monday Night and NFL Network games are simulcast on WTTV-4 and WTHR-13, respectively.

List of Indianapolis Colts starting quarterbacks

The Indianapolis Colts are a professional American football team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. They are currently members of the South Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL).

The club was officially founded in Baltimore, Maryland in 1953, as the Baltimore Colts, replacing a previous team of that name that folded in 1950. After 31 seasons in Baltimore, Colts owner Robert Irsay moved the team to Indianapolis.

The Colts have had 33 starting quarterbacks (QB) in the history of their franchise. The Colts' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee Johnny Unitas, as well as the Associated Press National Football League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) winners Earl Morrall and Bert Jones. Unitas also won the MVP award three times in his career. The franchise's first starting quarterback was Fred Enke, who started 9 games in total for the Colts. The Colts' starting quarterback from 1998 to 2011 was 5-time MVP Peyton Manning. The Colts' current starting quarterback is Andrew Luck.

List of Los Angeles Chargers starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the National Football League (NFL)'s Los Angeles Chargers or its predecessor, the San Diego Chargers. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the team.

Marty Domres

Martin Francis Domres (born April 17, 1947) is a former American collegiate and professional football player. From Columbia University, he was drafted in the first round of the Common Draft as a quarterback by the American Football League's San Diego Chargers. Domres played in nine professional football seasons from 1969–1977 for four teams. He is perhaps best known for replacing Johnny Unitas as the Baltimore Colts starting quarterback during the 1972 season.

Mike Pagel

Mike John Pagel (born September 13, 1960) is a former professional American football player who was selected by the Baltimore Colts in the fourth round of the 1982 NFL Draft. A 6'2", 206 lb (93 kg) quarterback from Arizona State, Pagel played in 12 NFL seasons from 1982–1993.

Drafted the same year as Art Schlichter, Pagel was drafted to be groomed as a backup. Generally he out-played Schlichter. Pagel bounced in and out of the starting quarterback job for the Colts in his four seasons with the team, alternating with Schlichter, Matt Kofler, and Mark Herrmann. He was the last Colt to wear #18 before Peyton Manning. He was traded to Cleveland for the 1986 season and served for the next five years there strictly as a backup. In 1988, he took over for an injured Bernie Kosar and Don Strock and played well in a playoff loss to the Houston Oilers.

Pagel finished up the last three years with the Los Angeles Rams, never garnering more than mop-up duties.

Pagel now resides in suburban Cleveland, Ohio, and is a project manager for AT&T. He also serves as analyst for the pregame, halftime and postgame shows on WTAM and WMMS during Browns games and offers television color commentary on college games on Fox Sports Network. Pagel also provides video commentary on his own site Pagel On Point. In addition, he presently is the quarterback coach at Normandy High School in Parma, Ohio. Sports is part of the family bloodline; Mike's brother Karl Pagel played baseball for the Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians. His brother Rick was a starting defensive end for the United States Naval Academy and served over 20 years as a helicopter pilot in the Marine Corps. Two of his other brothers also played junior college sports. His brother, Bruce, played offensive line at Glendale (AZ) Community College, and is now a professor of political science at Santa Fe College. His brother, Ross, played quarterback for Phoenix College, and later played first base for the college baseball team.

Purdue Boilermakers football statistical leaders

The Purdue Boilermakers football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Purdue Boilermakers football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Boilermakers represent Purdue University in the NCAA's Big 10 Conference.

Although Purdue began competing in intercollegiate football in 1887, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1946. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1946, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Boilermakers have played in seven bowl games since then.

The Boilermakers accumulated more than 5,000 yards eight times in the 11-year period between 1997 and 2007. However, they have only done it once since then, so there have not been nearly as many entries on this list since 2008 as there were in that 11-year stretch.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

Scott Campbell (American football)

Robert Scott Campbell (born April 15, 1962 in Hershey, Pennsylvania) is a former professional American football player who played quarterback for six seasons for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Atlanta Falcons. He appeared in 45 games in the NFL, starting 13. He played collegiately at Purdue University. He backed up Mark Herrmann for one season, then started over Jim Everett for the next three years.

Offense
Defense
Special teams

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.