Marigot, Saint Martin

Marigot is the main town and capital in the French Collectivity of Saint Martin.

Marigot
Marigot
Marigot
Marigot is located in Saint-Martin
Marigot
Marigot
Coordinates: 18°04′23″N 63°04′56″W / 18.0731°N 63.0822°WCoordinates: 18°04′23″N 63°04′56″W / 18.0731°N 63.0822°W
CountryFrance
Overseas collectivitySaint Martin
Population
 (2006)
 • Total5,700
Marigot Lighthouse
Marigot, Saint Martin is located in Saint-Martin
Marigot, Saint Martin
Saint Martin
LocationMarigot
Collectivity of Saint Martin
Coordinates18°04′15.8″N 63°05′11.5″W / 18.071056°N 63.086528°W
Constructionmasonry tower
Tower shapecylindrical frustum tower with light
Markings / patternwhite tower
Tower height10 metres (33 ft)
Focal height20 metres (66 ft)
Light sourcesolar power
Rangewhite: 11 nautical miles (20 km; 13 mi)
red: 7 nautical miles (13 km; 8.1 mi)
green: 7 nautical miles (13 km; 8.1 mi)
CharacteristicFl WRG 4s.
Admiralty numberJ5658
NGA number14732
ARLHS numberSTM-001[1][2]

Geography

Marigot is located on the west coast of the island of St. Martin. It extends from the coast to the west, along the Bay of Marigot and the hills of the interior of the island to the east. On the south-west it is bounded by the Simpson Bay.

Climate

Marigot has a tropical savanna climate (Köppen Aw), with very warm to hot and humid weather throughout the year.[3] Rainfall – which is reduced by the rain shadow of the mountains to the east – is not as extreme as in most climates of this type, with the peak occurring from August to November due to hurricanes.

Transport

The city is served by Princess Juliana International Airport as well as L'Espérance Airport. There is a ferry to Blowing Point, Anguilla.

History and features

Saint Martin Fort Louis 2010
Fort St. Louis, 2010.

Originally a fishing village on a swamp for which it was named, Marigot was made capital during the reign of King Louis XVI, who built Fort St. Louis on a hill near Marigot Bay. Today, that building is the most important in Marigot.

Marigot is typical of Caribbean towns, with gingerbread houses and sidewalk bistros. Market days are every Wednesday and Saturday morning. The crew of the 1997 motion picture Speed 2 shot the finale scene here where the Seabourn Legend hits the island.

The St. Martin of Tours' Church on rue du Fort Louis was built in 1941.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ San Martin The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 27 January 2017
  2. ^ List of Lights, Pub. 110: Greenland, The East Coasts of North and South America (Excluding Continental U.S.A. Except the East Coast of Florida) and the West Indies (PDF). List of Lights. United States National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. 2016.
  3. ^ "Marigot, Saint Martin Köppen Climate Classification (Weatherbase)". Weatherbase.
  4. ^ "Weatherbase: Historical Weather for The Valley, Anguilla". Weatherbase. 2011. Retrieved on November 24, 2011.
  5. ^ "The Catholic Church in Marigot". www.stmartinisland.org. Retrieved 2017-02-04.

External links

2010 FIVB Volleyball Women's World Championship qualification (NORCECA)

The NORCECA qualification for the 2010 FIVB Women's Volleyball World Championship saw member nations compete for six places at the finals in Japan.

2014 FIVB Volleyball Men's World Championship qualification (NORCECA)

The NORCECA qualification for the 2014 FIVB Volleyball Men's World Championship saw member nations compete for five places at the finals in Poland.

2018 FIVB Volleyball Women's World Championship qualification (NORCECA)

The NORCECA qualification for the 2018 FIVB Volleyball Women's World Championship will see member nations compete for six places at the finals in Japan. USA has directly qualified to 2018 World Championship as the 2014 World Champion.

Anguilla Channel

The Anguilla Channel (French: Canal d'Anguilla) is a strait in the Caribbean Sea. It separates the islands of Anguilla (a British Overseas Territory) in the north from Saint Martin (an Overseas collectivity of France) in the south.

Dudley Pope

Dudley Bernard Egerton Pope (29 December 1925 – 25 April 1997) was a British writer of both nautical fiction and history, most notable for his Lord Ramage series of historical novels. Greatly inspired by C.S. Forester, Pope was one of the most successful authors to explore the genre of nautical fiction, often compared to Patrick O'Brian.

FC Concordia (Saint-Martin)

FC Concordia is a Saint Martin football club that currently plays in the Saint-Martin Championships, the highest level of football on Saint Martin. The club's home ground is the Stade Vanterpool in Marigot, Saint Martin.

France–United Kingdom relations

France–United Kingdom relations are the relations between the governments of the French Republic and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK). The historical ties between France and the UK, and the countries that preceded it, are long and complex, including conquest, wars, and alliances at various points in history. The Roman era saw both areas, except northern England and Scotland, conquered by Rome, whose fortifications exist in both countries to this day, and whose writing system introduced a common alphabet to both areas; however, the language barrier remained. The Norman conquest of England in 1066 decisively shaped English history, as well as the English language. In the medieval period, the countries were often bitter enemies, with both nations' monarchs claiming control over France. The Hundred Years' War stretched from 1337 to 1453 resulting in French victory.

Britain and France fought a series of five major wars, culminating in the Coalition victory over Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815. After that there were some tensions, especially after 1880 over such issues as the Suez Canal and rivalry for African colonies. Despite some brief war scares, peace always prevailed. Friendly ties between the two began with the 1904 Entente Cordiale, particularly via the alliances in World War I and World War II, wherein both countries fought against Germany, and in the latter conflict British armies helped to liberate occupied France from the Nazis. Both nations opposed the Soviet Union during the Cold War and were founding members of NATO, the western military alliance led by the United States. Charles de Gaulle distrusted the British for being too close to the Americans, and for years he blocked British entry into the European common market, now called the European Union. De Gaulle also pulled France out of active role in NATO because that alliance was too heavily dominated by Washington. After his death, Britain did enter the European Union, and France returned to NATO.

In recent years the two countries have experienced a quite close relationship, especially on defence and foreign policy issues; the two countries tend, however, to disagree on a range of other matters, most notably the European Union. France and Britain are often still referred to as "historic rivals" or with emphasis on the perceived ever-lasting competition that still opposes the two countries. French author José-Alain Fralon characterised the relationship between the countries by describing the British as "our most dear enemies".

Unlike France, the United Kingdom plans to leave the European Union in 2019, after the United Kingdom voted so in a referendum held on 23 June 2016. It is estimated that about 350,000 French people live in the UK, with approximately 400,000 Britons living in France.

Irene (ketch)

Irene is a 100-foot ketch built in Bridgwater in 1907, the last ship built in the docks and the only ketch built in the West Country still sailing. It was built by FJ Carver and Son and launched in May 1907. The Blake Museum in Bridgwater opened an exhibit about the ship in 2010.

She was first owned by Symons of Bridgwater and named after Irene Symons. For 53 years the ship was a trading vessel for bricks, tiles and other goods, mainly in the Severn estuary and to Ireland. She was owned by the Bridgwater Brick and Tile Company. The ship retired from service in the 1960s and was found derelict by Dr Leslie Morrish, the present owner, in 1965. The ship was restored in Brentford, Middlesex, and the cargo hold was converted into quarters for 15.The ship was a charter vessel in the Caribbean until she sank due to a fire in 2003 at Marigot, Saint Martin and was restored once more. She ran aground off Arran on the way to the Tall Ships Race in Greenock July 2011, before being refloated. The ship sailed from Plymouth with an international crew called the New Dawn Traders to promote the transport of goods by sailing ships and to take goods including beer, olive oil, cocoa and coffee over the Atlantic.

Latin America

Latin America is a group of countries and dependencies in the Western Hemisphere where Romance languages such as Spanish, Portuguese, and French are predominantly spoken; it is broader than the terms Ibero-America or Hispanic America. The term "Latin America" was first used in an 1856 conference with the title "Initiative of the America. Idea for a Federal Congress of the Republics" (Iniciativa de la América. Idea de un Congreso Federal de las Repúblicas), by the Chilean politician Francisco Bilbao. The term was used also by Napoleon III's French government in the 1860s as Amérique latine to consider French-speaking territories in the Americas, (French Canadians, French Louisiana, French Guiana, Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint Martin, Saint Barthélemy) along with the larger group of countries where Spanish and Portuguese languages prevailed, including the Spanish-speaking portions of the United States (Southwestern United States and Florida) Today, areas of Canada and the United States (with the exception of Puerto Rico) where Spanish, Portuguese and French are predominant are typically not included in definitions of Latin America.

Latin America consists of 13 dependencies and 20 countries which cover an area that stretches from the northern border of Mexico to the southern tip of South America, including the Caribbean. It has an area of approximately 19,197,000 km2 (7,412,000 sq mi), almost 13% of the Earth's land surface area. As of 2016, its population was estimated at more than 639 million and in 2014, Latin America had a combined nominal GDP of US$5,573,397 million and a GDP PPP of 7,531,585 million USD.

List of countries and dependencies and their capitals in native languages

The following chart lists countries and dependencies along with their capital cities, in English as well as any additional official language(s).

In bold: Internationally recognized sovereign states

The 193 member states of the United Nations (UN)

Vatican City (administered by the Holy See, a UN observer state), which is generally recognized as a sovereign state

In bold italics: States with limited recognition and associated states not members of the United Nations

De facto sovereign states with partial international recognition, such as the State of Palestine, the Republic of Kosovo and Taiwan

De facto sovereign states lacking general international recognition

Cook Islands and Niue, two associated states of New Zealand without UN membership

In italics: Non-sovereign territories that are recognized by the UN as part of some member state

Dependent territories

Special territories recognized by international treaty (such as the special administrative regions of China)

Other territories often regarded as separate geographical territories even though they are integral parts of their mother countries (such as the overseas departments of France)

List of national capitals

This is a list of national capitals, including capitals of territories and dependencies, non-sovereign states including associated states and entities whose sovereignty is disputed. Sovereign states and observer states within the United Nations are shown in bolded text.

List of top-division football clubs in CONCACAF countries

This is a list of top-division association football clubs in CONCACAF countries. CONCACAF is the football confederation that oversees the sport in North America, Central America and the Caribbean, including the South American countries of Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana.

All countries and most of the dependent territories in this region have their own football associations which are members of CONCACAF, with the exceptions being Greenland and Saint-Pierre and Miquelon which are not members of CONCACAF or any other football confederation. The French Overseas Departments of French Guiana, Guadeloupe and Martinique, as well as Saint-Martin and Sint Maarten (the French and Dutch parts of the island of Saint Martin), also have their own football associations which are members of CONCACAF (but are not members of FIFA).

Each of the CONCACAF member countries have their own football league systems. The clubs playing in each top-level league compete for the title as the country's club champions, and also for places in next season's CONCACAF club competition, the CONCACAF Champions League (either directly for teams in the North American and Central American Zones, or through the CFU Club Championship for teams in the Caribbean Zone). Due to promotion and relegation, the clubs playing in the top-level league are different every season for some countries; however, some league systems (such as those of the United States and Canada) do not have promotion and relegation. The North American SuperLiga (North America) was an official tournament approved by the CONCACAF between the US/Canadian and Mexican leagues.

The champions of the previous season in each country are listed in bold. If the season is divided into Apertura and Clausura without a single season title, both champions of the previous season are bolded.

Please note: Some clubs play in a national football league other than their own country's. Where this is the case the club is noted as such.

For clubs playing at lower divisions, see the separate articles linked to in the relevant sections.

For clubs belonging to any of the other five continental football confederations of the world, see List of association football clubs.

Marigot

The French name Marigot is given to several places in the Caribbean:

Marigot, Dominica, a village in Dominica

Marigot, Saint Martin, the largest settlement on the French side of Saint Martin (Saint-Martin)

Marigot, Saint Barthélemy, a village in Saint Barthélemy

Marigot Bay, Saint Lucia

Le Marigot, a canton in Martinique's La Trinité arrondissement

Marigot, Sud-Est, a beach commune east of Jacmel, Haiti

Saint Martin

Saint Martin (French: Saint-Martin; Dutch: Sint Maarten) is an island in the northeast Caribbean Sea, approximately 300 km (190 mi) east of Puerto Rico. The 87-square-kilometre (34 sq mi) island is divided roughly 60/40 between the French Republic (53 km2, 20 sq mi) and the Kingdom of the Netherlands (34 km2, 13 sq mi), but the two parts are roughly equal in population. The division dates to 1648. The southern Dutch part comprises Sint Maarten and is one of four constituent countries that form the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The northern French part comprises the Collectivity of Saint Martin and is an overseas collectivity of France. Only the French part of the island is part of the European Union.

On 1 January 2009, the population of the whole island was 77,741 inhabitants, with 40,917 living on the Dutch side, and 36,824 on the French side.Collectively, the two territories are known as "St-Martin / St Maarten", or sometimes "SXM", the IATA identifier for Princess Juliana International Airport, the island's main airport. St. Martin (the French portion) received the ISO 3166-1 code MF in October 2007. The Dutch part changed in status to a country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands in 2010 and was given the code SX.

St. Martin of Tours' Church, Marigot

St. Martin of Tours Church (French: Église de Saint Martin de Tours) is a Roman Catholic parish of the Diocese of Basse-Terre located on rue du Fort Louis in the city of Marigot, St. Martin in the Lesser Antilles.

The church was built in 1941. In 1971 the church was expanded and a chapel was added.

It is under the pastoral responsibility of Fr. Père Samson Doriva. As its name suggests it is dedicated to St. Martin of Tours a Catholic bishop of Tours in France elevated to the status of saint by the Holy See.

Steven Austin (footballer)

Steven Austin (born 27 December 1990) is an Anguillan footballer who plays for the Anguilla national football team.

Thomas Dulorme

Thomas Dulorme Cordero ( dew-LOR-may; born January 29, 1990) is a Puerto Rican professional boxer and world title challenger. He was previously signed with Mayweather Promotions.

Ylaire Joachim

Ylaire Joachim (born 9 August 1997), is a Saint Martin international footballer who plays for the Saint Martin national football team.

Climate data for Marigot
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 28
(83)
28
(83)
28
(83)
29
(84)
30
(86)
31
(88)
31
(88)
31
(88)
31
(88)
31
(87)
29
(85)
28
(83)
30
(86)
Average low °C (°F) 24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
25
(77)
26
(78)
27
(80)
27
(80)
27
(80)
27
(80)
27
(80)
26
(78)
24
(76)
26
(78)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 74
(2.9)
48
(1.9)
43
(1.7)
79
(3.1)
99
(3.9)
71
(2.8)
84
(3.3)
110
(4.5)
120
(4.6)
99
(3.9)
120
(4.6)
91
(3.6)
1,038
(40.8)
Source: Weatherbase[4]

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