Marcia Wallace

Marcia Karen Wallace (November 1, 1942 – October 25, 2013) was an American actress, voice artist, comedian, and game show panelist, primarily known for her roles in television situation comedies. She is best known for her roles as receptionist Carol Kester on the 1970s sitcom The Bob Newhart Show and as the voice of elementary school teacher Edna Krabappel on the animated series The Simpsons, for which she won an Emmy in 1992. The character was retired after her death.

Wallace was known for her tall frame, red hair, and distinctive laugh. She had a career spanning five decades on TV, film, and stage. She was a frequent guest on The Merv Griffin Show, which led to her receiving a personal request to appear on The Bob Newhart Show in a role created especially for her. Diagnosed with breast cancer in 1985, she became a cancer activist, and remained so throughout her life.[1]

Marcia Wallace
Marcia Wallace at 47th Emmy Awards
Wallace at the 47th Emmy Awards on September 11, 1994
Born
Marcia Karen Wallace

November 1, 1942
DiedOctober 25, 2013 (aged 70)
Alma materParsons College
OccupationActress, voice artist, comedian
Years active1968–2013
Spouse(s)
Dennis Hawley
(m. 1986; died 1992)
Children1 (adopted)

Early life

Marcia Karen Wallace was born in Creston, Iowa, on November 1, 1942, the eldest of three children of Arthur "Poke" Wallace and wife Joann.[2] Her father owned and operated Wallace Sundries, a general merchandise store, where Marcia, her sister Sharon, and brother Jim would often help. While in high school, a teacher encouraged Wallace to consider a career in acting after she did well in a school play. Following graduation from Creston High School, Wallace attended Parsons College in Fairfield, Iowa, which had offered her a full scholarship. She was a member of the Delta Nu chapter of Delta Zeta sorority. At Parsons, she majored in English and Theater, performing in Brigadoon and The Music Man.[2]

Career

On the day she graduated from college. Wallace moved from Iowa to New York with $148 in her pocket.[2][3] To make ends meet, she typed scripts, performed in summer stock, did commercials, and worked as a substitute English teacher in the Bronx.[2] After performing for a year in a Greenwich Village nightclub, Wallace and four fellow entertainer friends formed an improvisational group called The Fourth Wall. In 1968, Wallace appeared for a year off-Broadway with the group. Afterwards, she made several other appearances in improvisational shows,[4] and, after losing 100 pounds (45 kg) from her previous weight of 230,[3] appeared in a nude[3] production of Dark of the Moon at the avant-garde Mercer Arts Center.[5]

Bob Newhart Show Carols Wedding 1975
Wallace with Bob Newhart (right) and Will Mackenzie in the season 4 episode of The Bob Newhart Show, "Carol's Wedding", 1975

Wallace was a semiregular on The Merv Griffin Show, appearing over 75 times. When the show moved to Los Angeles, Wallace moved with it at Griffin's request.[2] One of these appearances in March 1972 led to a phone call from TV producer Grant Tinker, who offered her a supporting role on The Bob Newhart Show on the recommendation of CBS founder Bill Paley.[2] The role of Carol Kester (later Carol Kester Bondurant), the sarcastic receptionist to Dr. Robert Hartley, Bob Newhart's character, was written specifically for her.[2][6] Newhart and Wallace reprised their roles from The Bob Newhart Show in "Anything but Cured", an episode of Murphy Brown.

When The Bob Newhart Show ended its six-season run in 1978, Wallace began three decades of television appearances on game shows, including Match Game, Hollywood Squares, Password Plus and Super Password, Celebrity Whew!, Crosswits, Hot Potato, Body Language, The $25,000 Pyramid, Double Talk, Win, Lose or Draw, To Tell the Truth, and Acting Crazy. She was also on special celebrity episodes of the Ray Combs version of Family Feud and the Jim Perry version of Card Sharks. In April 2008, she appeared on the interactive show GSN Live.

Other television roles include: as Darrin's secretary in "Laugh, Clown, Laugh", a Bewitched episode in 1971; two appearances on The Brady Bunch: once as Marcia's teacher in "Getting Davy Jones" and once as the woman who sells Jan a mod wig in "Will the Real Jan Brady Please Stand Up?"; as school principal Mrs. Lyman in two episodes of ALF; as Mrs. Carruthers in a few episodes of Full House. Wallace also had guest appearances on Charles in Charge, Murder, She Wrote, Magnum, P.I., Columbo, and A Different World.[3] On one of the last episodes of Taxi, she portrayed herself, chosen as the ideal date of Rev. Jim Ignatowski. Later, Wallace played the maid on the satirical series That's My Bush!, and in 2009 appeared on the daytime soap opera The Young and the Restless, playing Annie Wilkes, an inefficient assistant kidnapper.

After The Simpsons started in 1989, Wallace joined the voice acting cast as the voice of Edna Krabappel, who she played until her death in 2013. In 1992, she received a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance for the episode "Bart the Lover".

On film, Wallace appeared in such features as My Mother the Werewolf, Teen Witch, and Ghoulies III: Ghoulies Go to College.[3] In the 2008 film Tru Loved, she played a high school drama teacher who sponsors a gay–straight alliance.

Wallace's work onstage included An Almost Perfect Person in Los Angeles, which she also produced; a tour of the female version of Neil Simon's The Odd Couple; and productions of Same Time, Next Year, Twigs, It Had to Be You, Supporting Cast, Prisoner of Second Avenue, and Plaza Suite. Wallace made her musical stage debut in the 1983, Sacramento Music Circus production of Gypsy.[7] She returned the following season in Promises, Promises. Other stage productions include Born Yesterday, You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown, Steel Magnolias, and Last of the Red Hot Lovers, in which she played all three female roles at various times.[3] She performed in The Vagina Monologues in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, and San Diego.[3] In 2013, she voiced the librarian in Monsters University, and in 2014 (posthumously) she portrayed herself in the movie Muffin Top: A Love Story.

Personal life

Wallace married hotelier Dennis Hawley on May 18, 1986, in a Buddhist ceremony.[8] The couple adopted an infant son, Michael Wallace "Mikey" Hawley.[2] Wallace was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1985,[9] after which she became an activist and lecturer on the subject.[1] Dennis Hawley died from pancreatic cancer in June 1992.[10]

On January 27, 2007, Wallace won the Gilda Radner Courage Award from Roswell Park Cancer Institute for helping educate Americans about the importance of early cancer detection and inspiring others through her 20 years as a breast cancer survivor. Wallace was a member of Delta Zeta sorority and was named the Delta Zeta 2010 Woman of the Year at the 2010 Biennial National Convention in Tucson, Arizona. Her autobiography, titled Don't Look Back, We're Not Going That Way, which was published in 2004, recounts the early detection of her breast cancer, the loss of her husband Dennis, her nervous breakdown, her single motherhood, and other experiences such as a history of bulimia. She credited the title of the book to her father, who used the phrase often during her childhood.[2]

Illness and death

Wallace died from pneumonia and sepsis on October 25, 2013, aged 70, a week before her 71st birthday. Breast cancer was also listed as a significant condition on her death certificate.[11] Wallace was cremated following a private funeral service.[12]

Staff on The Simpsons had reportedly been aware of her ill health.[12] Showrunner Al Jean said, "I was tremendously saddened to learn this morning of the passing of the brilliant and gracious Marcia Wallace."[6] Yeardley Smith, who voices Lisa Simpson, tweeted, "Heaven is now a much funnier place b/c of you, Marcia."[13] Former co-star Bob Newhart commented on his Facebook fan page, "Marcia's death came as quite a shock, she left us too early. She was a talented actress and dear friend[.]"[14] Al Jean said that producers planned to retire her "irreplaceable" character Edna Krabappel.[6] The Simpsons episode "Four Regrettings and a Funeral" was shown on November 3, 2013, and dedicated to her.[15] Wallace had recorded lines for several upcoming episodes, and her final episode "The Man Who Grew Too Much" aired on March 9, 2014.[15]

In 2015, Lego released minifigures based on The Simpsons characters; a minifigure of her character was later included in tribute.

References

  1. ^ a b Marcia Wallace Archived June 17, 2006, at the Wayback Machine at Corporate Artists
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Longden, Tom (April 10, 2005). "Creston's Marcia Wallace brings humor to every role". Des Moines Register via Parsons College alumni website. Retrieved October 5, 2012. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Biography Archived October 31, 2015, at the Wayback Machine from MarciaWallace.com
  4. ^ Marcia Wallace at the Internet Off-Broadway Database
  5. ^ Dark of the Moon at the Internet Off-Broadway Database
  6. ^ a b c "'Simpsons' star Marcia Wallace dies at 70". Chicago Tribune. Reuters. October 26, 2013. Archived from the original on October 29, 2013.
  7. ^ Brown, Carol (August 10, 1983). "Actors enjoy their stay, on and off stage". The Day. New London, Connecticut. p. 18. Retrieved October 28, 2013.
  8. ^ "Famous Iowans - Marcia Wallace". The Des Moines Register. Retrieved November 2, 2015.
  9. ^ "Marcia Wallace". The Speak Well Being Group. Archived from the original on November 21, 2008. Retrieved December 23, 2008.
  10. ^ Television Guide
  11. ^ "Marcia Wallace's death caused by pneumonia and breast cancer". Toronto Sun. November 24, 2013. Retrieved March 10, 2014.
  12. ^ a b "Marcia Wallace, actress from 'The Simpsons' and 'The Bob Newhart Show', dies at 70". Entertainment Weekly. October 26, 2013. Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  13. ^ Best, Jessica (October 26, 2013). "Marcia Wallace dies: Tributes as voice of The Simpsons' Edna Krabappel passes away aged 70". Daily Mirror.
  14. ^ "Bob Newhart". facebook.com. Retrieved November 2, 2015.
  15. ^ a b Hughes, Jason (November 4, 2013). "'The Simpsons' Pays Tribute to Marcia Wallace with Final Chalkboard Message". HuffPost. Retrieved November 4, 2013.

External links

1942 in television

The year 1942 in television involved some significant events.

Below is a list of television-related events during 1942.

2013 in animation

Events in 2013 in animation.

Bart the Lover

"Bart the Lover" is the sixteenth episode of The Simpsons' third season. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on February 13, 1992. In the episode, Edna Krabappel, Bart's teacher, feels increasingly isolated and, looking for a companion, places a personal ad in the newspaper. Bart, who was given a month's detention for breaking the class fish tank with his yo-yo, decides to get revenge by responding to the ad. He creates a new adult male alter ego named Woodrow, inspired by a picture of former President Woodrow Wilson, and Mrs. Krabappel becomes infatuated with "Woodrow". Meanwhile, Ned Flanders asks Homer to cut down on his swearing, so Homer starts using a swear jar.

The episode was written by Jon Vitti and directed by Carlos Baeza. Vitti had wanted an episode centered on Mrs. Krabappel that examined what it was like to have Bart as a student. It was the first episode of the show to feature her in a prominent role. The subplot where Homer tries to clean up his language was written partially in response to the complaints the show had been getting about the amount of cursing on the show. Woodrow's voice was performed by Harry Shearer, who did an impression of Ricardo Montalbán. The picture Bart sends Edna is of NHL and WHA star Gordie Howe. The writers had originally wanted to use a picture of American football player Johnny Unitas, but were unable to get the rights to use his image.

In its original airing on the Fox Network during February sweeps, the episode had a 12.9 Nielsen rating, finishing the week ranked 29th, up from the season's average.

Marcia Wallace, the voice of Mrs. Krabappel, won a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance for her role in the episode.

Bob Newhart

George Robert Newhart (born September 5, 1929) is an American stand-up comedian and actor, noted for his deadpan and slightly stammering delivery. Newhart came to prominence in 1960 when his album of comedic monologues, The Button-Down Mind of Bob Newhart, became a worldwide bestseller and reached number one on the Billboard pop album chart; it remains the 20th-best selling comedy album in history. The follow-up album, The Button-Down Mind Strikes Back!, was also a success, and the two albums held the Billboard number one and number two spots simultaneously.Newhart later went into acting, starring as Chicago psychologist Dr. Robert Hartley in The Bob Newhart Show during the 1970s and then as Vermont innkeeper Dick Loudon on the 1980s series Newhart. He also had two short-lived sitcoms in the 1990s, Bob and George and Leo. Newhart had film roles such as Major Major in Catch-22 and Papa Elf in Elf. He provided the voice of Bernard in the Disney animated films The Rescuers and The Rescuers Down Under. In 2004, he played the library head Judson in The Librarian, a character that continued in 2014 on the TV series The Librarians. In 2013, Newhart made his first of six guest appearances on The Big Bang Theory as Professor Proton, for which he received his first Primetime Emmy Award on September 15, 2013.

Edna Krabappel

Edna Krabappel-Flanders (also Krabappel) is a fictional character from the animated American sitcom The Simpsons, who was voiced by Marcia Wallace from 1990 until her death in October 2013. She was a 4th grade teacher, who taught Bart Simpson's class at Springfield Elementary School. In the twenty-third season, she married Ned Flanders, the widower of Maude Flanders, helping raise Rod and Todd Flanders until her death.

Edna is the only character that Wallace voiced on a regular basis. Following Wallace's death, the show's producers announced their intention to retire the character. Edna Krabappel's final speaking role was the epilogue of the 25th season episode "The Man Who Grew Too Much".

Four Regrettings and a Funeral

"Four Regrettings and a Funeral" is the third episode of the 25th season of the American animated sitcom The Simpsons, and the 533rd episode of the series. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on November 3, 2013. It was written by Marc Wilmore and directed by Mark Kirkland. The episode is dedicated in memory of Marcia Wallace (the voice of Edna Krabappel) who died on October 25, 2013. In addition, the chalkboard gag in the opening sequence was changed to read a single "We'll really miss you Mrs. K" as Bart looks on solemnly. The title is a spoof of Four Weddings and a Funeral.

For this episode, Harry Shearer won his first Emmy Award for Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance.

Inge Solbrig

Inge Solbrig (born 1944 as Ingeborg Solbig also known as Inge Solbrig-Combrinck) is a German actress and voice actress best known as the German voice of several characters in The Simpsons including Edna Krabappel, Helen Lovejoy, Judge Constance Harm, Crazy Cat Lady, Mona Simpson, Lunchlady Doris, Itchy & Scratchy and a lot of additional voices.

She was married to Ivar Combrinck († 2006) who produced Futurama, Family Guy and The Simpsons in Germany.

List of The Simpsons cast members

The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom that includes six main voice actors and numerous regular cast and recurring guest stars. The principal cast consists of Dan Castellaneta, Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Yeardley Smith, Hank Azaria and Harry Shearer. Chris Edgerly, Pamela Hayden, Tress MacNeille, Kevin Michael Richardson, Maggie Roswell, and Russi Taylor have appeared as supporting cast members, along with former supporting cast members Karl Wiedergott, Marcia Mitzman Gaven, Doris Grau, and Christopher Collins. Repeat guest cast members include Marcia Wallace, Albert Brooks, Phil Hartman, Jon Lovitz, Joe Mantegna and Kelsey Grammer. With one exception, episode credits list only the voice actors, and not the characters they voice.

Both Fox and the production crew wanted to keep their identities secret during the early seasons and closed most of the recording sessions while refusing to publish photos of the recording artists. The network eventually revealed which roles each actor performed in the episode "Old Money", because the producers said the voice actors should receive credit for their work. Every main cast member has won an Emmy for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance. Shearer was the last cast member to win, receiving his award in 2014 for the episode "Four Regrettings and a Funeral." Castellaneta and Azaria have won four, while Kavner, Cartwright, Smith, Shearer, Wallace, Grammer, and guest star Jackie Mason have each won one.

List of The Simpsons guest stars

In addition to the show's regular cast of voice actors, celebrity guest stars have been a staple of The Simpsons, an American animated television sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company, since its first season. The Simpsons focuses on the eponymous family, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa and Maggie. The family was initially conceived by Groening for a series of animated shorts, which originally aired as a part of The Tracey Ullman Show between 1987 and 1989. The shorts were developed into a half-hour prime time series which began in December 1989. The series' 29th season began in October 2017 and 665 episodes of The Simpsons have aired. A feature film adaptation of the series called The Simpsons Movie, was released in 2007.

Guest voices have come from a wide range of professions, including actors, athletes, authors, musicians, artists, politicians and scientists. In the show's early years most guest stars voiced original characters, but as the show has continued the number of those appearing as themselves has increased.

The first credited guest star was Marcia Wallace who appeared in "Bart the Genius" in her first stint as Bart's teacher Edna Krabappel. Singer Tony Bennett was the first guest star to appear as himself, appearing briefly in the season two episode "Dancin' Homer". Several guest stars have featured as recurring characters on the show, including Phil Hartman, Joe Mantegna and Kelsey Grammer. Hartman made the most appearances, guest starring 52 times. Grammer, Mantegna, Maurice LaMarche and Frank Welker have appeared twenty times or more; Jon Lovitz and Jackie Mason have appeared over ten times, while Albert Brooks, Glenn Close, Michael Dees, Dana Gould, Terry W. Greene, Valerie Harper, Jan Hooks, Jane Kaczmarek, Stacy Keach, Kipp Lennon, J. K. Simmons, Sally Stevens, George Takei and Michael York have made over five appearances.

Two guest stars, Ricky Gervais and Seth Rogen, earned writing credits for the episodes in which they appeared. Grammer, Mason and three-time guest star Anne Hathaway all won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance for guest voice roles on the show. The show was awarded the Guinness World Record for "Most Guest Stars Featured in a TV Series" in 2010. As of October 13, 2019, there have been 830 guest stars on the show[A], with this figure rising to 835 if The Simpsons Movie is included.

List of The Simpsons guest stars (seasons 1–20)

In addition to the show's regular cast of voice actors, celebrity guest stars have been a staple of The Simpsons, an American animated television sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company, since its first season. The Simpsons focuses on the eponymous family, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa and Maggie. The family was initially conceived by Groening for a series of animated shorts, which originally aired as a part of The Tracey Ullman Show between 1987 and 1989. The shorts were developed into a half-hour prime time series which began in December 1989. The series' 29th season began in October 2017 and 665 episodes of The Simpsons have aired. A feature film adaptation of the series called The Simpsons Movie, was released in 2007.

Guest voices have come from a wide range of professions, including actors, athletes, authors, musicians, artists, politicians and scientists. In the show's early years most guest stars voiced original characters, but as the show has continued the number of those appearing as themselves has increased.

The first credited guest star was Marcia Wallace who appeared in "Bart the Genius" in her first stint as Bart's teacher Edna Krabappel. Singer Tony Bennett was the first guest star to appear as himself, appearing briefly in the season two episode "Dancin' Homer". Several guest stars have featured as recurring characters on the show, including Phil Hartman, Joe Mantegna and Kelsey Grammer. Hartman made the most appearances, guest starring 52 times. Grammer, Mantegna, Maurice LaMarche and Frank Welker have appeared twenty times or more; Jon Lovitz and Jackie Mason have appeared over ten times, while Albert Brooks, Glenn Close, Michael Dees, Dana Gould, Terry W. Greene, Valerie Harper, Jan Hooks, Jane Kaczmarek, Stacy Keach, Kipp Lennon, J. K. Simmons, Sally Stevens, George Takei and Michael York have made over five appearances.

Two guest stars, Ricky Gervais and Seth Rogen, earned writing credits for the episodes in which they appeared. Grammer, Mason and three-time guest star Anne Hathaway all won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance for guest voice roles on the show. The show was awarded the Guinness World Record for "Most Guest Stars Featured in a TV Series" in 2010. As of October 13, 2019, there have been 830 guest stars on the show[A], with this figure rising to 835 if The Simpsons Movie is included.

== History ==

Guest stars have appeared on The Simpsons since its first season, in addition to the show's main cast of Dan Castellaneta, Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Yeardley Smith, Hank Azaria and Harry Shearer and supporting cast of Tress MacNeille, Pamela Hayden, Maggie Roswell, Chris Edgerly and former supporting cast members Russi Taylor, Marcia Mitzman Gaven, Karl Wiedergott, Doris Grau, Jo Ann Harris, Susan Blu and Christopher Collins. Kevin Michael Richardson started as a recurring guest star in the twenty first season, but joined the supporting cast in the twenty eighth, starting with the episode "The Last Traction Hero".

Guest voices have come from a wide range of professions, including actors, athletes, authors, musicians, artists, politicians and scientists. In the earlier seasons, most of the guest stars voiced characters, but eventually more started appearing as themselves. The first male guest star was actor Sam McMurray, who voiced a worker at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant in "Homer's Odyssey", the show's third episode, and Marcia Wallace was the first female guest star on the show starting from Bart the Genius as Edna Krabappel and Ms. Melon. Singer Tony Bennett was the first guest star to appear as himself, appearing in the season two episode "Dancin' Homer" while Aerosmith were the first band with their cameo in the third season's "Flaming Moe's"

Several guest stars have made multiple appearances on the show, often as recurring characters. Actress Marcia Wallace guest starred 176 times, making her the most recurring female guest star on the show, until her death in 2013. Edna Krabappel was then retired from the show, but sometimes appears as a ghost, and actor Phil Hartman guest-starred in 52 episodes, more than any other male actor, although his initial role in the second season episode "Bart Gets Hit By a Car" in 1991 was intended to be a one-off. He voiced the recurring characters Troy McClure and Lionel Hutz as well as numerous other one-time characters, until his death in 1998. McClure and Hutz were subsequently retired from the show. Actor Kelsey Grammer first appeared as Sideshow Bob in the first-season episode "Krusty Gets Busted" while actor Joe Mantegna made his first appearance as Fat Tony in the third season episode "Bart the Murderer". The two have appeared in 21 and 28 episodes respectively; Mantegna also appeared in the film. Both roles were originally written for other actors: Bob was originally to be voiced by James Earl Jones, who later guest starred three times on the show, while Fat Tony was written for Sheldon Leonard. Other repeat guest stars include Albert Brooks, Glenn Close, Jan Hooks, Maurice LaMarche, Jon Lovitz, Jane Kaczmarek, Jackie Mason, Charles Napier and Frank Welker.

According to Groening, guest star choices "come from the writers saying, 'Wouldn't it be cool to have [such a person on the show]?'", while showrunner Al Jean has stated the reasoning is "we want to meet our heroes." Bill Oakley and Josh Weinstein, showrunners of the seventh and eight seasons, favored guest stars with what they felt were unique and interesting voices such as actors R. Lee Ermey, Donald Sutherland, Kirk Douglas and Lawrence Tierney. In 2014, Jean stated that fewer people would be appearing as themselves, as the staff did not want it to become a "crazy roster".Many guest stars come into the show's recording studio to record their parts, although some are recorded over the telephone. Two guest stars have been credited with writing the episode in which they guest starred. Comedian Ricky Gervais wrote the episode "Homer Simpson, This Is Your Wife", while actor Seth Rogen co-wrote the episode "Homer the Whopper" with Evan Goldberg. Two guest stars were credited with pseudonyms. Actor Dustin Hoffman was credited as "Sam Etic" for the episode "Lisa's Substitute" while musician Michael Jackson was credited as "John Jay Smith" for the episode "Stark Raving Dad". After the latter episode, the producers decided that if a celebrity wished to guest star on the show, they had to be willing to be credited under their real name.Numerous people have rejected the chance to appear on the show. Actor William Shatner has been described as the first person to reject the show. The producers have consistently failed to persuade any former President of the United States to appear. Musicians Bruce Springsteen and Bob Dylan have also rejected multiple invitations to guest star on the series. Other people to turn the show down include actors Michael Caine, Tom Cruise, Tiff Needell, Archie Norman, Kyle MacLachlan, Natalie Imbruglia, Clint Eastwood and Anthony Hopkins and director Quentin Tarantino. Musician Prince turned down a role in a sequel to "Stark Raving Dad", which meant the script was never produced.Others have accepted the offer, but have been unable to record a role. Musician Frank Zappa and actor Anthony Perkins both became too ill to record their parts, while Jim Carrey had to drop out due to time constraints, and Faye Dunaway cancelled. Christopher Walken originally agreed appear as himself in "Insane Clown Poppy". However, he then decided to demand a lot more money than the producers were willing to pay. Instead, Jay Mohr provided the voice of Walken. In the end credits, Jay Mohr is actually credited with the voice of Christopher Walken, the credit says "Jay Mohr as Christopher Walken". This is the first time this has ever been done.

Robby Krieger of The Doors recorded a cameo for the episode "The Great Money Caper", but his part was cut because the writers felt his appearance seemed too forced. The scene was later included on the season's DVD release. Similarly, actress Catherine O'Hara recorded the voice of Colette the waitress in "Flaming Moe's", but was redubbed with Jo Ann Harris who the producers felt was a better fit. Ron Howard, in what would have been his third appearance on The Simpsons, was advertised as guest starring on "Children of a Lesser Clod". However, he did not appear for any recording sessions.

Mason, Grammer and Anne Hathaway have each won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance for their guest voice roles on the show. The show was awarded the Guinness World Record for "Most Guest Stars Featured in a TV Series" on May 23, 2010, with Guinness estimating that the show has featured "at least 555 as of series 21". As of October 13, 2019, there have been 830 guest stars on the show, totaling 1432 guest spots.[A] These figures rise to 835 and 1440 respectively if The Simpsons Movie is counted as well.

== Guest stars ==

The color of the season number in the first column corresponds to the color of that season's DVD boxset or digital purchase image for the seasons which have not been released in physical format.

In the No. column:

The first number refers to the order it aired during the entire series.

The second number refers to the episode number within its season: i.e. 1506 would be the sixth episode of the fifteenth season.

The production code refers to the code assigned to the episode by the production team. The first two characters refer to the season the episode was made for. The first season is 7Gxx, the second is 7Fxx, the third is 8Fxx and the fourth is 9Fxx. After that, the fifth season started with 1F and continued in order until season nine (which was 5F). Starting with season ten, the production codes started with AABF, with the first letter changing for each season (i.e. BABF, CABF, etc.). The number at the end of the code is the order in which that episode was produced during that production run.

Guests with "(archival)" after their names refer to cases where roles were not recorded specifically for the episode, but instead archival audio and/or footage from independent sources was used in the episode. In most cases these appearances have been uncredited and are usually not considered as proper guest stars given the circumstances.

Marcia (given name)

Marcia (, rarely ), often shortened to Marcie , is a female given name of Italian origin, derived from Latin meaning "dedicated to Mars". Marcia also means "proud, warlike, martial". It is a female form of Marcius. Bearers of this name include:

Queen Marcia, legendary monarch of Britain

Marcia Anastasia Christoforides

Marcia M. Anderson, first African-American woman to attain major general in the USAR

Marcia Angell

Marcia Ball

Marcia Barrett

Marcia Barton

Marcia Brown

Marcia Ciol, Brazilian-American statistician

Marcia Clark

Marcia Cross

Marcia Davenport

Marcia Falkender, Baroness Falkender

Marcia Mitzman Gaven

Marcia Griffiths

Marcia Gudereit

Marcia Gay Harden

Marcia Hines, Australian singer

Marcia A. Karrow

Marcia V. Keizs

Marcia Kramer

Marcia Langton

Marcia Layne, British playwright

Marcia Lucas

Marcia MacMillan

Marcia Marx

Marcia Mead, American architect

Marcia Neave

Marcia Pankratz

Marcia Pelham, Countess of Yarborough

Marcia Rodd

Marcia Strassman

Marcia Theophilo

Marcia Trimble

Marcia Wallace

Marcia Wilbur

Marcia Yockey

James Marcia

Marcia Fudge

Peter Bonerz

Peter Bonerz (, born August 6, 1938) is an American actor and director who is best known for his role as Dr. Jerry Robinson on The Bob Newhart Show.

That's My Bush!

That's My Bush! is an American sitcom that aired on Comedy Central from April 4 to May 23, 2001. The show was created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone, best known for creating South Park.

Despite the political overtones, the show itself was a broad lampoon of American sitcoms, including lame jokes, a laugh track, and stock characters such as klutzy bimbo secretary Princess (Kristen Miller), know-it-all maid Maggie (Marcia Wallace), and supposedly helpful "wacky" next door neighbor Larry (John D'Aquino).

The series was conceived in the wake of the 2000 presidential election, between Bush and Al Gore. Parker and Stone were sure that Gore would win the election, and tentatively titled the show Everybody Loves Al. However, due to the controversy regarding the election's outcome, the series was pushed back. Instead, the show was then plotted around Bush at the workplace.The show received positive reviews, with The New York Times commenting, "That's My Bush! is a satire of hero worship itself; it is the anti-West Wing and the first true post-Clinton comedy. [...] This politically astute criticism is embedded in so much hysterical humor that the series never seems weighty."

The Bob Newhart Show

The Bob Newhart Show is an American sitcom produced by MTM Enterprises that aired on CBS from September 16, 1972, to April 1, 1978, with a total of 142 half-hour episodes over six seasons. Comedian Bob Newhart portrays a psychologist whose interactions with his wife, friends, patients, and colleagues lead to humorous situations and dialogue. The show was filmed before a live audience.

The Castaways on Gilligan's Island

The Castaways on Gilligan's Island is a 1979 made-for-television comedy film that continues the adventures of the shipwrecked castaways from the 1964–67 sitcom Gilligan's Island and the first reunion movie, Rescue from Gilligan's Island, featuring the original cast from the television series with the exception of Tina Louise, who was replaced in the role of Ginger Grant by Judith Baldwin. Written by Al Schwartz, Elroy Schwartz and series creator Sherwood Schwartz and directed by Earl Bellamy, it was first broadcast on NBC May 3, 1979. Unlike the independently-produced Rescue from Gilligan's Island, this and the subsequent The Harlem Globetrotters on Gilligan's Island were produced by MCA/Universal Television.

The Ned-Liest Catch

"The Ned-Liest Catch" is the twenty-second episode and season finale of the twenty-second season of The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on May 22, 2011. This is the second season finale to end on a cliffhanger, with the first being "Who Shot Mr. Burns?" from the sixth season. It is the third episode and the second one from season 22 (the other being "The Great Simpsina") to have no opening credits, blackboard or couch gag.The episode sees Edna Krabappel and Ned Flanders begin dating, their relationship being left to the public vote. It has been followed by "The Falcon and the D'ohman", which revealed that they are still together, and "Ned 'n Edna's Blend", which revealed that they have since married.

The Simpsons (season 14)

The Simpsons' fourteenth season was originally broadcast on the Fox network in the United States between November 3, 2002 and May 18, 2003. The show runner for the fourteenth production season was Al Jean, who executive produced 21 of 22 episodes. The other episode, "How I Spent My Strummer Vacation", was run by Mike Scully. The season contains five hold-overs from the previous season's production run. The fourteenth season has met with mostly positive reviews and won two Primetime Emmy Awards, including Outstanding Animated Program (For Programming less than One Hour), four Annie Awards and a Writers Guild of America Award. This season contains the show's 300th episode, "The Strong Arms of the Ma".

Writers credited with episodes in the fourteenth season included J. Stewart Burns, Kevin Curran, John Frink & Don Payne, Dana Gould, Dan Greaney, Brian Kelley, Tim Long, Ian Maxtone-Graham, Carolyn Omine, Mike Scully, Matt Selman, John Swartzwelder, Matt Warburton and Marc Wilmore. Freelance writers included Brian Pollack & Mert Rich, Sam O'Neal & Neal Boushall, Dennis Snee and Allen Glazier. Animation directors included Bob Anderson, Mike B. Anderson, Chris Clements, Mark Kirkland, Lance Kramer, Nancy Kruse, Lauren MacMullan, Pete Michels, Steven Dean Moore, Matthew Nastuk, Michael Polcino, Jim Reardon and David Silverman. The main cast consisted of Dan Castellaneta (Homer Simpson, Grampa Simpson, Krusty the Clown among others), Julie Kavner (Marge Simpson), Nancy Cartwright (Bart Simpson, Ralph Wiggum, Nelson Muntz), Yeardley Smith (Lisa Simpson), Hank Azaria (Moe Szyslak, Apu, Chief Wiggum, among others) and Harry Shearer (Ned Flanders, Mr. Burns, Principal Skinner, among others). Other cast members included Marcia Wallace (Edna Krabappel), Pamela Hayden (Milhouse Van Houten, among others), Tress MacNeille (Agnes Skinner, among others), Russi Taylor (Martin Prince) and Karl Wiedergott (Additional Voices). This season also saw the return of voice actress Maggie Roswell (Helen Lovejoy, Maude Flanders, among others), who had left the show during season 11 because of a contract dispute."Barting Over", which aired February 16, 2003, was promoted as the show's milestone 300th episode. However, "The Strong Arms of the Ma" was the 300th episode to be broadcast. According to Ben Rayner of the Toronto Star, "It's very difficult to find a straight answer why milestone status has been bestowed on ["Barting Over"]. Some rationalize that the 300 figure doesn't account for two early holiday specials, Fox maintains that there was some discrepancy between the original, scheduled broadcast date- deep in the heart of the ratings-mad February sweeps- and the number of episodes that were eventually aired leading up to it." "Barting Over" refers to the error when Marge tells Lisa "I can't count the number of times (Homer) has done something crazy like this." Lisa responds that it is 300, to which Marge replies that she "could have sworn it's been 302".

The Simpsons (season 25)

The Simpsons' twenty-fifth season began airing on Fox on September 29, 2013, and ended on May 18, 2014.

In this season, Homer sells his Mapple stock to buy a bowling ball; Marge blames herself and Kiss for Bart's rebellious streak ("Four Regrettings and a Funeral"); Lisa becomes a cheerleader for Springfield's football team; and Homer delivers a baby ("Labor Pains"). Guest stars for this season include Judd Apatow, Will Arnett, Anderson Cooper, Harlan Ellison, Zach Galifianakis, Stan Lee, Eva Longoria, Rachel Maddow, Elisabeth Moss, Joe Namath, Daniel Radcliffe, Aaron Sorkin, Max von Sydow, and Kristen Wiig. This is Al Jean's 13th consecutive season as showrunner and 15th overall. Matt Groening, James L. Brooks, Matt Selman, and John Frink serve as executive producers. Executive producer Al Jean stated that Edna Krabappel was retired from the show following the death of Marcia Wallace on October 25, 2013.No episodes aired in February due to Fox airing the Super Bowl XLVIII, the 2014 Winter Olympics, the 2014 Daytona 500 and the 86th Academy Awards.This season The Simpsons won three Primetime Emmy Awards out of four nominations, including a Primetime Emmy Award for Character Voice-Over Performance to Harry Shearer, who was the last member of the main cast to earn the award.

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