Major League Baseball titles streaks

At the end of each Major League Baseball season, the league leaders of various statistical categories are announced. Leading the league in a particular category is referred to as a title.

The following lists describe which players held, or at least shared, the title for a particular category three or more seasons in a row. Streaks of three years or more are shown for each league. Players listed under MLB led both the AL and NL in those years, or had a sufficient total in a given category to lead the major leagues without leading either league (for example, Mark McGwire's 58 homers in 1997 were the most in MLB, but he led neither league because he was traded from the Oakland Athletics to the St. Louis Cardinals in midseason). Active streaks are highlighted.

Consecutive home run titles

NL
[1] Ralph Kiner, 7 (1946–1952)
Gavvy Cravath, 3 (1913–1915)
Chuck Klein, 3 (1931–1933)
Mel Ott, 3 (1936–1938)
Mike Schmidt, 3 (1974–1976)
AL
[1] Babe Ruth, 6 (1926–1931)
Harry Davis, 4 (1904–1907)
Frank Baker, 4 (1911–1914)
Babe Ruth, 4 (1918–1921)
Harmon Killebrew, 3 (1962–1964)
Ken Griffey, Jr., 3 (1997–1999)
Alex Rodriguez, 3 (2001–2003)
MLB
Ralph Kiner, 6 (1947–1952)
Babe Ruth, 4 (1918–1921)
Babe Ruth, 4 (1926–1929)
Mark McGwire, 4 (1996–1999)
Gavvy Cravath, 3 (1913–1915)
Mike Schmidt, 3 (1974–1976)

Consecutive Batting titles

Note that private researchers, such as baseball-reference.com, dispute Cobb's 1910 title.

NL
[2] Rogers Hornsby, 6 (1920–1925)
Honus Wagner, 4 (1906–1909)
Tony Gwynn, 4 (1994–1997)
Stan Musial, 3 (1950–1952)
Tony Gwynn, 3 (1987–1989)
AL
[2] Ty Cobb, 9 (1907–1915)
Nap Lajoie, 4 (1901–1904)
Rod Carew, 4 (1972–1975)
Wade Boggs, 4 (1985–1988)
Ty Cobb, 3 (1917–1919)
Miguel Cabrera, 3 (2011–2013)
MLB
Ty Cobb, 5 (1909–1913)
Ty Cobb, 3 (1917–1919)
Rod Carew, 3 (1973–1975)

Consecutive Slugging average titles

NL
Dan Brouthers, 6 (1881–1886)
Rogers Hornsby, 6 (1920–1925)
Barry Bonds, 4 (2001–2004)
Honus Wagner, 3 (1907–1909)
Chuck Klein, 3 (1931–1933)
Johnny Mize, 3 (1938–1940)
Frank Robinson, 3 (1960–1962)
Willie McCovey, 3 (1968–1970)
Mike Schmidt, 3 (1980–1982)
AL
Babe Ruth, 7 (1918–1924)
Ty Cobb, 6 (1907–1912)
Babe Ruth, 6 (1926–1931)
Ted Williams, 4 (1946–1949)

Consecutive Total base titles

NL
Honus Wagner, 4 (1906–1909)
Chuck Klein, 4 (1930–1933)
Rogers Hornsby, 3 (1920–1922)
Joe Medwick, 3 (1935–1937)
Johnny Mize, 3 (1938–1940)
Hank Aaron, 3 (1959–1961)
AL
Ty Cobb, 3 (1907–1909)
Jim Rice, 3 (1977–1979)

Consecutive Hits titles

NL
Ginger Beaumont, 3 (1902–1904)
Rogers Hornsby, 3 (1920–1922)
Frank McCormick, 3 (1938–1940)
AL
Ichiro Suzuki, 5 (2006–2010)
Ty Cobb, 3 (1907–1909)
José Altuve, 4 (2014–2017)[3]
Johnny Pesky, 3 (1942, 1946–1947) (military service 1943–45)
Tony Oliva, 3 (1964–1966)
Kirby Puckett, 3 (1987–1989)

Consecutive Doubles titles

NL
Honus Wagner, 4 (1906–1909)
Dan Brouthers, 3 (1886–1888)
Rogers Hornsby, 3 (1920–1922)
Joe Medwick, 3 (1936–1938)
Stan Musial, 3 (1952–1954)
Pete Rose, 3 (1974–1976)
AL
Tris Speaker, 4 (1920–1923)
Don Mattingly, 3 (1984–1986)

Consecutive Triples titles

NL
Garry Templeton, 3 (1977–1979)
AL
Elmer Flick, 3 (1905–1907)
Sam Crawford, 3 (1913–1915)
Zoilo Versalles, 3 (1963–1965)
Lance Johnson, 3 (1992–1994)
Carl Crawford, 3 (2004–2006)

Consecutive Runs batted in titles

NL
Cap Anson, 3 (1880–1882)
Cap Anson, 3 (1884–1886)
Rogers Hornsby, 3 (1920–1922)
Joe Medwick, 3 (1936–1938)
George Foster, 3 (1976–1978)
AL
Ty Cobb, 3 (1907–1909)
Babe Ruth, 3 (1919–1921)
Cecil Fielder, 3 (1990–1992)

Consecutive Runs titles

AA
Harry Stovey, 3 (1883–1885)
NL
King Kelly, 3 (1884–1886)
Chuck Klein, 3 (1930–1932)
Duke Snider, 3 (1953–1955)
Pete Rose, 3 (1974–1976)
Albert Pujols, 3 (2003–2005)
AL
Ty Cobb, 3 (1909–1911)
Eddie Collins, 3 (1912–1914)
Babe Ruth, 3 (1919–1921)
Babe Ruth, 3 (1926–1928)
Ted Williams, 3 (1940–1942)
Mickey Mantle, 3 (1956–1958)
Mike Trout, 3 (2012–2014)

Consecutive Bases on balls titles

NL
Roy Thomas, 5 (1900–1904)
Barry Bonds, 5 (2000–2004)
Billy Hamilton, 4 (1894–1897)
Barry Bonds, 4 (1994–1997)
George Burns, 3 (1919–1921)
Mel Ott, 3 (1930–1932)
Arky Vaughan, 3 (1934–1936)
Eddie Mathews, 3 (1961–1963)
Ron Santo, 3 (1966–1968)
Mike Schmidt, 3 (1981–1983)
AL
Donie Bush, 4 (1909–1912)
Babe Ruth, 4 (1930–1933)
Ted Williams, 4 (1946–1949)
Babe Ruth, 3 (1926–1928)
Lou Gehrig, 3 (1935–1937)

Consecutive On-base percentage titles

NL
Rogers Hornsby, 6 (1920–1925)
Barry Bonds, 4 (2001–2004)
Joey Votto, 4 (2010–2013)
Honus Wagner, 3 (1907–1909)
Arky Vaughan, 3 (1934–1936)
Elbie Fletcher, 3 (1940–1942)
Joe Morgan, 3 (1974–1976)
Mike Schmidt, 3 (1981–1983)
Barry Bonds, 3 (1991–1993)
AL
Wade Boggs, 5 (1985–1989)
Lou Gehrig, 4 (1934–1937)
Ted Williams, 4 (1946–1949)
Ty Cobb, 3 (1913–1915)
Babe Ruth, 3 (1919–1921)
Babe Ruth, 3 (1930–1932)
Ted Williams, 3 (1940–1942)
Ted Williams, 3 (1956–1958)

Consecutive Stolen base titles

NL
Maury Wills, 6 (1960–1965)
Vince Coleman, 6 (1985–1990)
Bob Bescher, 4 (1909–1912)
Max Carey, 4 (1915–1918)
Max Carey, 4 (1922–1925)
Willie Mays, 4 (1956–1959)
Lou Brock, 4 (1966–1969)
Lou Brock, 4 (1971–1974)
Tim Raines, 4 (1981–1984)
Kiki Cuyler, 3 (1928–1930)
Bill Bruton, 3 (1953–1955)
Tony Womack, 3 (1997–1999)
José Reyes, 3 (2005–2007)
Michael Bourn, 3 (2009–2011)
AL
Luis Aparicio, 9 (1956–1964)
Rickey Henderson, 7 (1980–1986)
Kenny Lofton, 5 (1992–1996)
George Case, 5 (1939–1943)
Bert Campaneris, 4 (1965–1968)
Rickey Henderson, 4 (1988–1991)
Ty Cobb, 3 (1915–1917)
Ben Chapman, 3 (1931–1933)
Bob Dillinger, 3 (1947–1949)
Minnie Miñoso, 3 (1951–1953)

Consecutive At bats titles

NL
Sparky Adams, 3 (1925–1927)
Dave Cash, 3 (1974–1976)
AL
Ichiro Suzuki, 5 (2004–2008)
Doc Cramer, 3 (1933–1935)
Doc Cramer, 3 (1940–1942)
Bobby Richardson, 3 (1962–1964)

Consecutive Strike out titles (batters)

NL
Hack Wilson, 4 (1927–1930)
Vince DiMaggio, 4 (1942–1945)
Juan Samuel, 4 (1984–1987)
Pud Galvin, 3 (1879–1881)
Mike Schmidt, 3 (1974–1976)
Andrés Galarraga, 3 (1988–1990)
Sammy Sosa, 3 (1997–1999)
Adam Dunn, 3 (2004–2006)
Mark Reynolds, 3 (2008–2010)
AL
Reggie Jackson, 4 (1968–1971)
Jimmie Foxx, 3 (1929–1931)
Pat Seerey, 3 (1944–1946)
Jim Lemon, 3 (1956–1958)
Mickey Mantle, 3 (1958–1960)
Bobby Darwin, 3 (1972–1974)
Jack Cust, 3 (2007–2009)
MLB
Mark Reynolds, 4 (2008–2011)
Adam Dunn, 3 (2004–2006)

Consecutive ERA titles

Sandy Koufax
Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax
NL
Sandy Koufax, 5 (1962–1966)
Clayton Kershaw, 4 (2011–2014)
Greg Maddux, 3 (1993–1995)
AL
Lefty Grove, 4 (1929–1932)
Roger Clemens, 3 (1990–1992)
MLB
Clayton Kershaw, 4 (2011–2014)
Greg Maddux, 3 (1993–1995)

Consecutive Wins titles

NL
Warren Spahn, 5 (1957–1961)
Pete Alexander, 4 (1914–1917)
Robin Roberts, 4 (1952–1955)
Bill Hutchinson, 3 (1890–1892)
Kid Nichols, 3 (1896–1898)
Tom Glavine, 3 (1991–1993)
AL
Walter Johnson, 4 (1913–1916)
Cy Young, 3 (1901–1903)
Bob Feller, 3 (1939–1941)
Hal Newhouser, 3 (1944–1946)
MLB
Robin Roberts, 4 (1952–1955)
Kid Nichols, 3 (1896–1898)
Pete Alexander, 3 (1915–1917)
Hal Newhouser, 3 (1944–1946)

Consecutive Games Pitched titles

NL
Joe McGinnity, 5 (1903–1907)
Bill Hutchinson, 3 (1890–1892)
Ace Adams, 3 (1942–1944)
Steve Kline, 3 (1999–2001)
Pedro Feliciano, 3 (2008–2010)
AL
Firpo Marberry, 3 (1924–1926)
Wilbur Wood, 3 (1968–1970)
MLB
Firpo Marberry, 3 (1924–1926)
Ace Adams, 3 (1942–1944)
Steve Kline, 3 (1999–2001)
Different leagues
Paul Quantrill, 4 (2001 (AL), 2002–2003 (NL), 2004 (AL))

Consecutive Saves titles

NL
Mordecai Brown, 4 (1908–1911)
Bruce Sutter, 4 (1979–1982)
AL
Dan Quisenberry, 4 (1982–1985)
Firpo Marberry, 3 (1924–1926)
MLB
Firpo Marberry, 3 (1924–1926)

Consecutive Innings Pitched titles

NL
Robin Roberts, 5 (1951–1955)
Greg Maddux, 5 (1991–1995)
Pete Alexander, 4 (1914–1917)
John Clarkson, 3 (1887–1889)
Bill Hutchinson, 3 (1890–1892)
Bucky Walters, 3 (1939–1941)
Phil Niekro, 3 (1977–1979)
Orel Hershiser, 3 (1987–1989)
Liván Hernández, 3 (2003–2005)
AL
Walter Johnson, 4 (1913–1916)
Wes Ferrell, 3 (1935–1937)
Bob Feller, 3 (1939–1941)
Jim Palmer, 3 (1976–1978)
MLB
Robin Roberts, 5 (1951–1955)
Pete Alexander, 3 (1915–1917)
Phil Niekro, 3 (1977–1979)

Consecutive Strike out titles (pitchers)

NL
Dazzy Vance, 7 (1922–1928)
Pete Alexander, 4 (1914–1917)
Dizzy Dean, 4 (1932–1935)
Warren Spahn, 4 (1949–1952)
Randy Johnson, 4 (1999–2002)
Amos Rusie, 3 (1893–1896)
Noodles Hahn, 3 (1899–1901)
Christy Mathewson, 3 (1903–1905)
Johnny Vander Meer, 3 (1941–1943)
Tim Lincecum, 3 (2008–2010)
AL
Walter Johnson, 8 (1912–1919)
Lefty Grove, 7 (1925–1931)
Rube Waddell, 6 (1902–1907)
Bob Feller, 4 (1938–1941)
Nolan Ryan, 4 (1976–1979)
Randy Johnson, 4 (1992–1995)
Bob Feller, 3 (1946–1948)
Camilo Pascual, 3 (1961–1963)
Sam McDowell, 3 (1968–1970)
Nolan Ryan, 3 (1972–1974)
Roger Clemens, 3 (1996–1998)
Johan Santana, 3 (2004–2006)
MLB
Rube Waddell, 5 (1903–1907)
Randy Johnson, 5 (1998–2002)
Dizzy Dean, 4 (1932–1935)
Bob Feller, 4 (1938–1941)
Walter Johnson, 3 (1912–1914)
Dazzy Vance, 3 (1923–1925)
Bob Feller, 3 (1946–1948)
Warren Spahn, 3 (1950–1952)
Sam McDowell, 3 (1968–1970)
Nolan Ryan, 3 (1972–1974)
Randy Johnson, 3 (1993–1995)

Consecutive Games Started titles

NL
Robin Roberts, 5 (1951–1955)
Don Drysdale, 4 (1962–1965)
Phil Niekro, 4 (1977–1980)
Greg Maddux, 4 (1990–1993)
Tom Glavine, 4 (1999–2002)
Bill Hutchinson, 3 (1890–1892)
Bob Friend, 3 (1956–1958)
Tom Browning, 3 (1988–1990)
AL
Bobo Newsom, 4 (1936–1939)
Wilbur Wood, 4 (1972–1975)
Dave Stewart, 4 (1988–1991)
Bob Feller, 3 (1946–1948)
Mike Moore, 3 (1992–1994)
MLB
Robin Roberts, 5 (1951–1955)
Bobo Newsom, 4 (1936–1939)
Don Drysdale, 4 (1962–1965)
Wilbur Wood, 4 (1972–1975)
Phil Niekro, 4 (1977–1980)
Tom Glavine, 4 (1999–2002)
Bob Feller, 3 (1946–1948)
Bob Friend, 3 (1956–1958)

Consecutive Shutouts titles

NL
Tommy Bond, 3 (1877–1879)
Pete Alexander, 3 (1915–1917)
AA
Will White, 3 (1882–1884)
AL
Roger Clemens, 3 (1990–1992)

Consecutive Complete Games titles

NL
Warren Spahn, 7 (1957–1963)
Robin Roberts, 5 (1952–1956)
Pete Alexander, 4 (1914–1917)
Jim McCormick, 3 (1880–1882)
Bill Hutchinson, 3(1890–1892)
Bucky Walters, 3 (1939–1941)
Phil Niekro, 3 (1977–1979)
Greg Maddux, 3 (1993–1995)
AL
Walter Johnson, 4 (1913–1916)
Lefty Grove, 3 (1931–1933)
Wes Ferrell, 3 (1935–1937)
Billy Pierce, 3 (1956–1958)
Roy Halladay, 3 (2007–2009)
MLB
Robin Roberts, 5 (1952–1956)
Warren Spahn, 4 (1957–1960)
Wes Ferrell, 3 (1935–1937)

Consecutive Walks titles (pitchers)

NL
Amos Rusie, 5 (1890–1894)
Jimmy Ring, 4 (1922–1925)
Mickey Welch, 3 (1884–1886)
Cy Seymour, 3 (1897–1899)
Togie Pittinger, 3 (1902–1904)
AL
George Mullin, 4 (1903–1906)
Tommy Byrne, 3 (1949–1951)
Nolan Ryan, 3 (1972–1974)
Nolan Ryan, 3 (1976–1978)
Randy Johnson, 3 (1990–1992)
MLB
Togie Pittinger, 3 (1902–1904)
Tommy Byrne, 3 (1949–1951)
Nolan Ryan, 3 (1972–1974)
Nolan Ryan, 3 (1976–1978)
Randy Johnson, 3 (1990–1992)

Consecutive Losses titles

NL
Phil Niekro, 4 (1977–1980)
Murry Dickson, 3 (1952–1954)
AL
Pedro Ramos, 4 (1958–1961)

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Yearly League Leaders & Records for Home Runs". Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  2. ^ a b "Yearly League Leaders & Records for Batting Avererage". Retrieved 2011-07-28.
  3. ^ "José Altuve stats". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved November 10, 2017.
Andrés Galarraga

Andrés José Padovani Galarraga (Spanish: [anˈdɾez ɣalaˈraɣa]; born June 18, 1961) is a Venezuelan former professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a first baseman for the Montreal Expos (1985–1991 and 2002), St. Louis Cardinals (1992), Colorado Rockies (1993–1997), Atlanta Braves (1998–2000), Texas Rangers (2001), San Francisco Giants (2001 and 2003) and Anaheim Angels (2004). He batted and threw right-handed.

At six-foot-three and 235 pounds (1.91 m, 117 kg), Galarraga began his professional career in Venezuela at the age of 16. Despite several injuries that plagued Galarraga throughout his career, he was a very popular player both for his achievements on the field, and for his big and bright smile. He was nicknamed The Big Cat (textually translated from English as El Gran Gato, although his nickname in his native Venezuela was El Gato) for his impressively quick reflexes and seamless defensive skills as a first baseman in spite of his large physical size. Galarraga was a five time All-Star, won two National League Gold Glove Awards and two NL Silver Slugger Awards, and won two MLB Comeback Player of the Year Award, the second time after his successful return to baseball following cancer treatment.

George Burns (outfielder)

George Joseph Burns (November 24, 1889 – August 15, 1966) was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball who spent most of his career as the leadoff hitter for the New York Giants. A soft-spoken person, he was nicknamed "Silent George" by his teammates, and he was said to be one of the best pool players ever to play major league baseball. An effective leadoff man who was revered for his plate discipline, Burns is one of only three players in major league history to lead the league in runs and walks five times each; the others are Ted Williams and Babe Ruth. A two-time stolen base champion, he holds the Giants franchise record for stolen bases in a single season (62, in 1914), and held the club's career record from 1919 to 1972. At the end of his career, his 1262 games in left field ranked eighth in major league history, and his total of 1844 games in the outfield ranked sixth in NL history.

Born in Utica, New York, Burns started his baseball career as a catcher, and reached the Giants in the latter half of the 1911 season. Because of his strong throwing arm and outstanding speed, manager John McGraw converted him into an outfielder. He joined the regular lineup in 1913 and, becoming one of the first players to wear sunglasses and using a long-billed cap, came to excel defensively in left field at the Polo Grounds with its difficult angles; the left field bleachers came to be known as "Burnsville", and his teammates would later describe him as the "greatest 'sunfielder' in the history of the game." In his rookie season he hit 37 doubles, bettering Jim O'Rourke's 1889 club record of 36; the mark would stand for only two years, however, before Larry Doyle hit 40 in 1915. 1913 also marked Burns' first World Series appearance, though he only batted .158 as the Giants lost.

In 1914 he led the NL in runs for the first time and batted a career-high .303, and also edged Josh Devore's 1911 club record of 61 steals by one; he finished fourth in the voting for the Chalmers (MVP) Award, in the last year such an award would be given in the NL until 1924. In 1917 he batted .302, led the NL in runs a third time and in walks for the first time, and finished second in the NL in total bases behind Hornsby; he also appeared in his second World Series, but had another poor performance, hitting .227 as the Giants again lost. In 1919 he led the league in runs, walks and steals again, and also led NL outfielders in fielding percentage for the first time. He surpassed his teammate Doyle's franchise record for career stolen bases; his eventual record of 334 was broken by Willie Mays in 1972. Burns hit for the cycle on September 17, 1920, and led the NL in runs for the fifth time that year.

In the 1921 World Series, Burns finally had a successful postseason; he had four hits in Game 3 as the Giants rolled to a 13–5 win, and had a 2-run double in the 8th inning of Game 4, breaking a 1–1 tie as New York evened the Series at two games each. He scored the deciding run in Game 6, and batted .333 for the Series as the Giants won their first title since 1905. Two months later he was sent to the Cincinnati Reds in a trade that brought third baseman Heinie Groh to the Giants. In 1922 Burns set an NL record with his 28th steal of home, surpassing the old mark held by Honus Wagner; Max Carey broke his record later in the decade. He also set a Reds club record with 631 at bats (Hughie Critz broke the mark in 1928). In the Reds' first game at New York that season, he was given a day in his honor and presented with a diamond-studded watch.

Burns ended his major league career with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1925. In a 15-season career, he was a .287 hitter with 1,188 runs, 41 home runs and 611 runs batted in in 1853 games played. He collected 2,077 hits with a .366 on-base percentage, and his 383 stolen bases ranked 12th all-time at that point. Although he never had more than 181 hits in a season, playing in an era of diminished hitting, he was among the league's top five players six times. Defensively, he recorded a .970 fielding percentage at all three outfield positions. His NL record of leading the league in outfield games six times was later matched by Billy Williams and Dale Murphy; his Giants record of 1184 games in left field was broken by Jo-Jo Moore in 1941.

In 1918, a sportswriter asked John McGraw who the best player he ever managed was aside from Christy Mathewson. McGraw said, "George Burns! He is a marvel in every department of play, a superb fielder, a wonderful thrower, a grand batsman and with few peers in baseball history as a run scorer. Best of all, Burns, modest and retiring to an extreme, is the easiest player to handle that ever stepped upon a field."In a 1920 Sporting News article, sportswriter John B. Sheridan ranked Burns as the fourth greatest outfielder in history, behind only Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker and Jimmy Sheckard. "I am one of those who think that Burns has been underrated in New York and elsewhere," Sheridan said. "He is one of the great outfielders of all time. I have never seen him play a bad game of baseball."In 1927 he became a player-coach with Williamsport in the New York–Penn League, and he returned to the Giants in 1937 as a coach. He later worked for a tannery, and retired in 1957.

Burns died in Gloversville, New York at age 76.

Greg Maddux

Gregory Alan Maddux (born April 14, 1966) is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. Maddux is best known for his accomplishments while playing for the Atlanta Braves and the Chicago Cubs. With the Braves, he won the 1995 World Series over the Cleveland Indians. The first to achieve a number of feats and records, he was the first pitcher in major league history to win the Cy Young Award for four consecutive years (1992–1995), matched by only one other pitcher, Randy Johnson. During those four seasons, Maddux had a 75–29 record with a 1.98 earned run average (ERA), while allowing less than one baserunner per inning.Maddux is the only pitcher in MLB history to win at least 15 games for 17 straight seasons. In addition, he holds the record for most Gold Gloves with 18. A superb control pitcher, Maddux won more games during the 1990s than any other pitcher and is 8th on the all-time career wins list with 355. Since the start of the post-1920 live-ball era, only Warren Spahn (363) recorded more career wins than Maddux. He is one of only 10 pitchers ever to achieve both 300 wins and 3,000 strikeouts, and is the only pitcher to record more than 300 wins, more than 3,000 strikeouts, and fewer than 1,000 walks.Since his retirement as a player, Maddux has also served as a special assistant to the general manager for both the Cubs and Texas Rangers. On January 8, 2014, he was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, in his first year of eligibility, receiving 97.2 percent of the votes.

Ichiro Suzuki

Ichiro Suzuki (鈴木 一朗, Suzuki Ichirō, born October 22, 1973), often referred to mononymously as Ichiro (イチロー, Ichirō), is a Japanese former professional baseball outfielder who played 28 seasons combined in top-level professional leagues. He spent the bulk of his career with two teams: nine seasons with the Orix Blue Wave of Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) in Japan, where he began his career, and 14 with the Seattle Mariners of Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States. After playing the first 12 years of his MLB career for the Mariners, Ichiro played two and a half seasons with the New York Yankees before signing with the Miami Marlins. Ichiro played three seasons with the Marlins before returning to the Mariners in 2018. Ichiro established a number of batting records, including MLB's single-season record for hits with 262. He achieved 10 consecutive 200-hit seasons, the longest streak by any player in history. Between his major league career in both Japan and the United States, Ichiro has the most hits by any player in top-tier professional leagues. He also has recorded the most hits of all Japanese-born players in MLB history.

In his combined playing time in the NPB and MLB, Ichiro received 17 consecutive selections both as an All-Star and Gold Glove winner, won nine league batting titles and was named Most Valuable Player (MVP) four times. While playing in the NPB, he won seven consecutive batting titles and three consecutive Pacific League MVP Awards. In 2001, Ichiro became the first Japanese-born position player to be posted and signed to an MLB club. He led the American League (AL) in batting average and stolen bases en route to being named AL Rookie of the Year and AL MVP.

Ichiro was the first MLB player to enter the Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame (The Golden Players Club). He was a ten-time MLB All-Star and won the 2007 All-Star Game MVP Award for a three-hit performance that included the event's first-ever inside-the-park home run. Ichiro won a Rawlings Gold Glove Award in each of his first 10 years in the majors, and had an American League–record seven hitting streaks of 20 or more games, with a high of 27. He is also noted for his longevity, continuing to produce at a high level with batting, slugging, and on-base percentages above .300 in 2016, while approaching 43 years of age. In 2016, Ichiro notched the 3,000th hit of his MLB career, against Chris Rusin of the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field, becoming only the 30th player ever to do so. In total, he finished with 4,367 hits in his professional career across Japan and the United States.

José Altuve

José Carlos Altuve (Spanish pronunciation: [alˈtuβe]; born May 6, 1990) is a Venezuelan professional baseball second baseman for the Houston Astros of Major League Baseball (MLB). The Astros signed Altuve as an amateur free agent in 2007, and he made his major league debut in 2011. A right-handed batter and thrower, as of 2017 he was the shortest active MLB player at 5 feet 6 inches (1.68 m). His listed weight is 165 pounds (75 kg). From 2014 to 2017, Altuve recorded at least 200 hits each season and led the American League (AL) in the category. He won three batting championships in that span.

A six-time MLB All-Star, Altuve has been voted the starting second baseman for the AL in the All-Star Game four times. In 2017, he won the AL Most Valuable Player Award, the Hank Aaron Award, and became a World Series champion with the Astros, each for the first time. Also in 2017, Altuve was Sports Illustrated's co-Sportsperson of the Year with J. J. Watt of the NFL's Houston Texans for helping to lead relief efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Further awards Altuve received in 2017 were the Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year, The Sporting News Major League Player of the Year (making him the fifth player to be selected in consecutive years), and Baseball America's Major League Player of the Year. He has also won five Silver Slugger Awards and one Rawlings Gold Glove. In 2014, he became the first player in over 80 years to reach 130 hits and 40 stolen bases before the All-Star Game. That same season, he became the first Astro to win a batting title, leading the AL with a .341 average. He has twice led the AL in stolen bases. From Maracay, Venezuela, Altuve played for the Venezuelan national team in the 2017 World Baseball Classic (WBC).

Kenny Lofton

Kenneth Lofton (born May 31, 1967) is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) center fielder. Lofton was a six-time All-Star (1994–1999), four-time Gold Glove Award winner (1993–1996), and at retirement, was ranked fifteenth among all-time stolen base leaders with 622. During his career, he played for the Houston Astros, Cleveland Indians (three different times), Atlanta Braves, Chicago White Sox, San Francisco Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs, New York Yankees, Philadelphia Phillies, Los Angeles Dodgers, and Texas Rangers.

Lofton attended the University of Arizona on a basketball scholarship. The Wildcats made it to the Final Four in 1988. He did not join the school's baseball team until his junior year.

Lofton made 11 postseason appearances, including World Series appearances in 1995 and 2002 with the Indians and Giants, respectively. From 2001 to 2007, Lofton did not spend more than one consecutive season with a team. For his career, the Indians were the only team he played with for longer than one season and the only franchise he played for more than once. Lofton played ​9 1⁄2 seasons with the Indians, helping the organization win six division titles. In 2010, he was inducted into the Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame.

During his professional baseball career, Lofton's single-season stolen base count led the American League (AL) on five occasions and three times MLB. In 1994, he led the American League in hits. Lofton broke Rickey Henderson's record of 33 career post-season stolen bases during the 2007 post-season. Of his base running, Frank White said, "Lofton has out-thought a lot of major-league players" and later, "a smart, complete baseball player."

List of Major League Baseball individual streaks

The following is a list of notable individual streaks achieved in Major League Baseball.

Major League Baseball titles leaders

At the end of each Major League Baseball season, the league leaders of various statistical categories are announced. Leading either the American League or the National League in a particular category is referred to as a title.

The following lists describe which players hold the most titles in a career for a particular category. Listed are players with four or more titles in a category. Active players are highlighted.

Michael Bourn

Michael Ray Bourn (born December 27, 1982) is an American former professional baseball center fielder. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies, Houston Astros, Atlanta Braves, Cleveland Indians, Arizona Diamondbacks, and Baltimore Orioles. He has also been a member of the United States national baseball team.

Bourn was raised in Houston, Texas, where he attended Nimitz High School and the University of Houston, playing baseball. He was named to the NL All-Star team in both 2010 and 2012 and won consecutive Gold Glove Awards in 2009 and 2010. Bourn also led the MLB in stolen bases in 2011, and led the National League in stolen bases from 2009–2011. He was as of 2018 in 119th place on the all-time Major League Baseball stolen base list, with 341.

Tony Gwynn

Anthony Keith Gwynn Sr. (May 9, 1960 – June 16, 2014), nicknamed "Mr. Padre", was an American professional baseball right fielder, who played 20 seasons (1982–2001) in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Diego Padres. The left-handed hitting Gwynn won eight batting titles in his career, tied for the most in National League (NL) history. He is considered one of the best and most consistent hitters in baseball history. Gwynn had a .338 career batting average, never hitting below .309 in any full season. He was a 15-time All-Star, recognized for his skills both on offense and defense with seven Silver Slugger Awards and five Gold Glove Awards. Gwynn was the rare player in his era that stayed with a single team his entire career, and he played in the only two World Series appearances in San Diego's franchise history. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007, his first year of eligibility.

Gwynn attended San Diego State University (SDSU), where he played both college baseball and basketball for the Aztecs. He was an all-conference player in both sports in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC), but was honored as an All-American in baseball. Gwynn was selected by the Padres in the third round of the 1981 MLB draft, as the 58th overall pick. He made his major-league debut the following year, and captured his first batting title in 1984, when San Diego advanced to its first-ever World Series. A poor fielder in college, Gwynn's work on his defense was rewarded in 1986, when he received his first Gold Glove. The following year, he won the first of three consecutive batting titles. Beginning in 1990, Gwynn endured four straight seasons which ended prematurely due to injuries, particular to his left knee. However, he experienced a resurgence with four straight batting titles starting in 1994, when he batted a career-high .394 in a strike-shortened season. Gwynn played in his second World Series in 1998, before reaching the 3,000-hit milestone the following year. He played two more seasons, hampered by injuries in both, and retired after the 2001 season with 3,141 career hits.

A contact hitter, Gwynn excelled at hitting the ball to the opposite field. After meeting Hall of Famer Ted Williams in 1992, Gwynn became more adept at pulling the ball and using the entire field, as well as hitting for more power. He could also run early in his career, when he was a stolen base threat. Widely considered the greatest player in Padres history, Gwynn regularly accepted less money to remain with the small-market team. After he retired from playing, the Padres retired his No. 19 in 2004. Gwynn became the head baseball coach at his alma mater, and also spent time as a baseball analyst. Gwynn died of salivary gland cancer in 2014 at the age of 54.

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