Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award

The Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) is an annual Major League Baseball (MLB) award given to one outstanding player in the American League and one in the National League. Since 1931, it has been awarded by the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA). The winners receive the Kenesaw Mountain Landis Memorial Baseball Award, which became the official name of the award in 1944,[1] in honor of the first MLB commissioner, Kenesaw Mountain Landis, who served from 1920 until his death on November 25, 1944.[1][2]

MVP voting takes place before the postseason, but the results are not announced until after the World Series. The BBWAA began by polling three writers in each league city in 1938, reducing that number to two per league city in 1961.[3] The BBWAA does not offer a clear-cut definition of what "most valuable" means, instead leaving the judgment to the individual voters.[4][5]

First basemen, with 34 winners, have won the most MVPs among infielders, followed by second basemen (16), third basemen (15), and shortstops (15). Of the 25 pitchers who have won the award, 15 are right-handed while 10 are left-handed. Walter Johnson, Carl Hubbell, and Hal Newhouser are the only pitchers who have won multiple times, Newhouser winning consecutively in 1944 and 1945.[6][7]

Hank Greenberg, Stan Musial, Alex Rodriguez, and Robin Yount have won at different positions,[6] while Rodriguez is the only player who has won the award with two different teams at two different positions.[8] Barry Bonds has won the most often (seven times) and the most consecutively (four: 2001–04).[9] Jimmie Foxx was the first player to win multiple times;[10] 9 players have won three times, and 19 have won twice.[11] Frank Robinson is the only player to win the award in both the American and National Leagues.

The award's only tie occurred in the National League in 1979, when Keith Hernandez and Willie Stargell received an equal number of points.[6][12] There have been 18 unanimous winners, who received all the first-place votes.[3] The New York Yankees have the most winning players with 22, followed by the St. Louis Cardinals with 17 winners. The award has never been presented to a member of the following three teams: Arizona Diamondbacks, New York Mets, and Tampa Bay Rays.

In recent decades, pitchers have rarely won the award. When Justin Verlander won the AL award in 2011, he became the first pitcher in either league to be named the MVP since Dennis Eckersley in 1992. Verlander also became the first starting pitcher to win this award since Roger Clemens accomplished the feat in 1986.[13] The National League went even longer without an MVP award to a pitcher. After Bob Gibson won in 1968, no pitcher in that league was named MVP until Clayton Kershaw in 2014.[14]

Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award (MVP)
A black circle with an octagonal silver plaque in the middle. The edge of the plaque reads "KENESAW MOUNTAIN LANDIS MEMORIAL BASEBALL AWARD". In the middle of the octagon is a baseball diamond which contains, from the top, Judge Landis' face in gold, "Most Valuable Player", the winner's league, his name in a gold rectangle, and his team.
The Most Valuable Player award
Given forMajor League Baseball's Regular Season MVP
CountryUnited States
Presented byBaseball Writers' Association of America
History
First award1931
Most recent

Chalmers Award (1911–1914)

Ty-Cobb-1913-NPC-detail-1.jpeg
Ty Cobb won the first American League Chalmers Award in 1911 and was at the center of the controversy over the previous season's award.

Before the 1910 season, Hugh Chalmers of Chalmers Automobile announced he would present a Chalmers Model 30 automobile to the player with the highest batting average in Major League Baseball at the end of the season. The 1910 race for best average in the American League was between the Detroit Tigers' widely disliked[3][15][16] Ty Cobb and Nap Lajoie of the Cleveland Indians. On the last day of the season, Lajoie overtook Cobb's batting average with seven bunt hits against the St. Louis Browns. American League President Ban Johnson said a recalculation showed that Cobb had won the race anyway, and Chalmers ended up awarding cars to both players.[3]

The following season, Chalmers created the Chalmers Award. A committee of baseball writers were to convene after the season to determine the "most important and useful player to the club and to the league". Since the award was not as effective at advertising as Chalmers had hoped, it was discontinued after 1914.[3]

Year American League winner Team Position National League winner Team Position Ref
1911 Ty Cobbdagger§ Detroit Tigers OF Frank Schulte Chicago Cubs OF [17]
1912 Tris Speakerdagger Boston Red Sox OF Larry Doyle New York Giants 2B [18]
1913 Walter Johnsondagger Washington Senators RHP Jake Daubert Brooklyn Dodgers 1B [19]
1914 Eddie Collinsdagger Philadelphia Athletics 2B Johnny Eversdagger Boston Braves 2B [20]

League Awards (1922–1929)

Babe Ruth2
Babe Ruth was ineligible for the award in his famous 1927 season by the rules of the American League award because he had previously won in 1923.

In 1922 the American League created a new award to honor "the baseball player who is of the greatest all-around service to his club".[21] Winners, voted on by a committee of eight baseball writers chaired by James Crusinberry,[22] received a bronze medal and a cash prize.[23] Voters were required to select one player from each team and player-coaches and prior award winners were ineligible. Famously, these criteria resulted in Babe Ruth winning only a single MVP award before it was dropped after 1928. The National League award, without these restrictions, lasted from 1924 to 1929.[3]

Year American League winner Team Position National League winner Team Position Ref
1922 George Sislerdagger St. Louis Browns 1B [24]
1923 Babe Ruthdagger§ New York Yankees OF [25]
1924 Walter Johnsondagger (2) Washington Senators RHP Dazzy Vancedagger Brooklyn Robins RHP [26]
1925 Roger Peckinpaugh Washington Senators SS Rogers Hornsbydagger St. Louis Cardinals 2B [27]
1926 George Burns Cleveland Indians 1B Bob O'Farrell St. Louis Cardinals C [28]
1927 Lou Gehrigdagger New York Yankees 1B Paul Wanerdagger Pittsburgh Pirates OF [29]
1928 Mickey Cochranedagger Philadelphia Athletics C Jim Bottomleydagger St. Louis Cardinals 1B [30]
1929 Rogers Hornsbydagger (2) Chicago Cubs 2B [31]

Baseball Writers' Association of America's Most Valuable Player (1931–present)

The BBWAA first awarded the modern MVP after the 1931 season, adopting the format the National League used to distribute its league award. One writer in each city with a team filled out a ten-place ballot, with ten points for the recipient of a first-place vote, nine for a second-place vote, and so on. In 1938, the BBWAA raised the number of voters to three per city and gave 14 points for a first-place vote. The only significant change since then occurred in 1961, when the number of voters was reduced to two per league city.[3]

Jimmie Foxx 1937 cropped
Jimmie Foxx was the first player to win three MVP awards.
Hank Greenberg 1937 cropped
Hall of Famer and 2-time MVP, Hank Greenberg
Jim Konstanty
Jim Konstanty, to date the only National League relief pitcher to be named MVP won it in 1950.
Willie Mays cropped
Hall of Famer Willie Mays won the award in 1954 and 1965 with the same team in different cities.
BarryBonds1993
Barry Bonds' seven MVPs are the most for any individual player.
Alex Rodriguez Talking
Alex Rodriguez won the award with two different teams at two different positions.
DSC05863 Albert Pujols
Albert Pujols won the award three times, all at first base with the St. Louis Cardinals.
Miguel Cabrera batting against Angels (2012-09-09)
Miguel Cabrera was the winner of back-to-back AL Awards from 2012-13.
Josh Donaldson on September 30, 2015
Josh Donaldson won the AL MVP in 2015.
Yelichbrewers (cropped)
Christian Yelich was the winner of the NL MVP Award in 2018.
Year American League winner Team Position National League winner Team Position Ref
1931 Lefty Grove Philadelphia Athletics* LHP Frankie Frisch St. Louis Cardinals* 2B [32]
1932 Jimmie Foxx Philadelphia Athletics 1B Chuck Klein Philadelphia Phillies OF [33]
1933 Jimmie Foxx (2) Philadelphia Athletics 1B Carl Hubbell New York Giants* LHP [34]
1934 Mickey Cochrane (2) Detroit Tigers* C Dizzy Dean St. Louis Cardinals* RHP [35]
1935 Hank Greenberg†§ Detroit Tigers* 1B Gabby Hartnett Chicago Cubs* C [36]
1936 Lou Gehrig (2) New York Yankees* 1B Carl Hubbell†§ (2) New York Giants* LHP [37]
1937 Charlie Gehringer Detroit Tigers 2B Joe Medwick St. Louis Cardinals OF [38]
1938 Jimmie Foxx (3) Boston Red Sox 1B Ernie Lombardi Cincinnati Reds C [39]
1939 Joe DiMaggio New York Yankees* OF Bucky Walters Cincinnati Reds* RHP [40]
1940 Hank Greenberg (2) Detroit Tigers* OF Frank McCormick Cincinnati Reds* 1B [41]
1941 Joe DiMaggio (2) New York Yankees* OF Dolph Camilli Brooklyn Dodgers* 1B [42]
1942 Joe Gordon New York Yankees* 2B Mort Cooper St. Louis Cardinals* RHP [43]
1943 Spud Chandler New York Yankees* RHP Stan Musial St. Louis Cardinals* OF [44]
1944 Hal Newhouser Detroit Tigers LHP Marty Marion St. Louis Cardinals* SS [45]
1945 Hal Newhouser (2) Detroit Tigers* LHP Phil Cavarretta Chicago Cubs* 1B [46]
1946 Ted Williams Boston Red Sox* OF Stan Musial (2) St. Louis Cardinals* 1B [47]
1947 Joe DiMaggio (3) New York Yankees* OF Bob Elliott Boston Braves 3B [48]
1948 Lou Boudreau Cleveland Indians* SS Stan Musial (3) St. Louis Cardinals OF [49]
1949 Ted Williams (2) Boston Red Sox OF Jackie Robinson Brooklyn Dodgers* 2B [50]
1950 Phil Rizzuto New York Yankees* SS Jim Konstanty Philadelphia Phillies* RHP [51]
1951 Yogi Berra New York Yankees* C Roy Campanella Brooklyn Dodgers C [52]
1952 Bobby Shantz Philadelphia Athletics LHP Hank Sauer Chicago Cubs OF [53]
1953 Al Rosen§ Cleveland Indians 3B Roy Campanella (2) Brooklyn Dodgers* C [54]
1954 Yogi Berra (2) New York Yankees C Willie Mays New York Giants* OF [55]
1955 Yogi Berra (3) New York Yankees* C Roy Campanella (3) Brooklyn Dodgers* C [56]
1956 Mickey Mantle†§ New York Yankees* OF Don Newcombe Brooklyn Dodgers* RHP [57]
1957 Mickey Mantle (2) New York Yankees* OF Hank Aaron Milwaukee Braves* OF [58]
1958 Jackie Jensen Boston Red Sox OF Ernie Banks Chicago Cubs SS [59]
1959 Nellie Fox Chicago White Sox* 2B Ernie Banks (2) Chicago Cubs SS [60]
1960 Roger Maris New York Yankees* OF Dick Groat Pittsburgh Pirates* SS [61]
1961 Roger Maris (2) New York Yankees* OF Frank Robinson Cincinnati Reds* OF [62]
1962 Mickey Mantle (3) New York Yankees* OF Maury Wills Los Angeles Dodgers SS [63]
1963 Elston Howard New York Yankees* C Sandy Koufax Los Angeles Dodgers* LHP [64]
1964 Brooks Robinson Baltimore Orioles 3B Ken Boyer St. Louis Cardinals* 3B [65]
1965 Zoilo Versalles Minnesota Twins* SS Willie Mays (2) San Francisco Giants OF [66]
1966 Frank Robinson†§ (2) Baltimore Orioles* OF Roberto Clemente Pittsburgh Pirates OF [67]
1967 Carl Yastrzemski Boston Red Sox* OF Orlando Cepeda†§ St. Louis Cardinals* 1B [68]
1968 Denny McLain§ Detroit Tigers* RHP Bob Gibson St. Louis Cardinals* RHP [69]
1969 Harmon Killebrew Minnesota Twins 3B Willie McCovey San Francisco Giants 1B [70]
1970 Boog Powell Baltimore Orioles* 1B Johnny Bench Cincinnati Reds* C [71]
1971 Vida Blue Oakland Athletics LHP Joe Torre[c] St. Louis Cardinals 3B [72]
1972 Dick Allen Chicago White Sox 1B Johnny Bench (2) Cincinnati Reds* C [73]
1973 Reggie Jackson†§ Oakland Athletics* OF Pete Rose Cincinnati Reds OF [74]
1974 Jeff Burroughs Texas Rangers OF Steve Garvey Los Angeles Dodgers* 1B [75]
1975 Fred Lynn Boston Red Sox* OF Joe Morgan Cincinnati Reds* 2B [76]
1976 Thurman Munson New York Yankees* C Joe Morgan (2) Cincinnati Reds* 2B [77]
1977 Rod Carew Minnesota Twins 1B George Foster Cincinnati Reds OF [78]
1978 Jim Rice Boston Red Sox OF Dave Parker Pittsburgh Pirates OF [79]
1979 Don Baylor California Angels LF/DH [80] Keith Hernandez[d] St. Louis Cardinals 1B [12]
Willie Stargell[d] Pittsburgh Pirates* 1B
1980 George Brett Kansas City Royals* 3B Mike Schmidt†§ Philadelphia Phillies* 3B [81]
1981 Rollie Fingers Milwaukee Brewers RHP Mike Schmidt (2) Philadelphia Phillies 3B [82]
1982 Robin Yount Milwaukee Brewers* SS Dale Murphy Atlanta Braves OF [83]
1983 Cal Ripken, Jr. Baltimore Orioles* SS Dale Murphy (2) Atlanta Braves OF [84]
1984 Willie Hernández Detroit Tigers* LHP Ryne Sandberg Chicago Cubs 2B [85]
1985 Don Mattingly New York Yankees 1B Willie McGee St. Louis Cardinals* OF [86]
1986 Roger Clemens Boston Red Sox* RHP Mike Schmidt (3) Philadelphia Phillies 3B [87]
1987 George Bell Toronto Blue Jays OF Andre Dawson Chicago Cubs OF [88]
1988 Jose Canseco§ Oakland Athletics* OF Kirk Gibson Los Angeles Dodgers* OF [89]
1989 Robin Yount (2) Milwaukee Brewers OF Kevin Mitchell San Francisco Giants* OF [90]
1990 Rickey Henderson Oakland Athletics* OF Barry Bonds Pittsburgh Pirates OF [91]
1991 Cal Ripken, Jr. (2) Baltimore Orioles SS Terry Pendleton Atlanta Braves* 3B [92]
1992 Dennis Eckersley Oakland Athletics RHP Barry Bonds (2) Pittsburgh Pirates OF [93]
1993 Frank Thomas†§ Chicago White Sox 1B Barry Bonds (3) San Francisco Giants OF [94]
1994 Frank Thomas (2) Chicago White Sox 1B Jeff Bagwell†§ Houston Astros 1B [95]
1995 Mo Vaughn Boston Red Sox 1B Barry Larkin Cincinnati Reds SS [96]
1996 Juan González Texas Rangers OF Ken Caminiti§ San Diego Padres 3B [97]
1997 Ken Griffey, Jr.†§ Seattle Mariners OF Larry Walker Colorado Rockies OF [98]
1998 Juan González (2) Texas Rangers OF Sammy Sosa Chicago Cubs OF [99]
1999 Iván Rodríguez Texas Rangers C Chipper Jones Atlanta Braves* 3B [100]
2000 Jason Giambi Oakland Athletics 1B Jeff Kent San Francisco Giants 2B [101]
2001 Ichiro Suzuki Seattle Mariners OF Barry Bonds (4) San Francisco Giants OF [102][103]
2002 Miguel Tejada Oakland Athletics SS Barry Bonds§ (5) San Francisco Giants* OF [104]
2003 Alex Rodriguez Texas Rangers SS Barry Bonds (6) San Francisco Giants OF [105]
2004 Vladimir Guerrero Anaheim Angels OF Barry Bonds (7) San Francisco Giants OF [106]
2005 Alex Rodriguez (2) New York Yankees 3B Albert Pujols^ St. Louis Cardinals 1B [107]
2006 Justin Morneau Minnesota Twins 1B Ryan Howard Philadelphia Phillies 1B [108]
2007 Alex Rodriguez (3) New York Yankees 3B Jimmy Rollins Philadelphia Phillies SS [109]
2008 Dustin Pedroia^ Boston Red Sox 2B Albert Pujols^ (2) St. Louis Cardinals 1B [110]
2009 Joe Mauer Minnesota Twins C Albert Pujols (3) St. Louis Cardinals 1B [103][111]
2010 Josh Hamilton Texas Rangers OF Joey Votto^ Cincinnati Reds 1B [112][113]
2011 Justin Verlander^ Detroit Tigers RHP Ryan Braun^ Milwaukee Brewers OF [114][115]
2012 Miguel Cabrera^ Detroit Tigers* 3B Buster Posey^ San Francisco Giants* C [116][117]
2013 Miguel Cabrera^ (2) Detroit Tigers 3B Andrew McCutchen^ Pittsburgh Pirates OF [118][119]
2014 Mike Trout Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim OF Clayton Kershaw^ Los Angeles Dodgers LHP [14][120]
2015 Josh Donaldson^ Toronto Blue Jays 3B Bryce Harper Washington Nationals OF [121][122]
2016 Mike Trout^ (2) Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim OF Kris Bryant^ Chicago Cubs* 3B/OF [123]
2017 José Altuve^ Houston Astros* 2B Giancarlo Stanton^ Miami Marlins OF [124]
2018 Mookie Betts^ Boston Red Sox* RF Christian Yelich^ Milwaukee Brewers RF [125]

Key

Year Links to the article about the corresponding Major League Baseball season
dagger Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame as a player[126][127]
^ Denotes player who is still active[a]
§ Unanimous selection[b][3]
Player (X) Denotes winning player and number of times they had won the award at that point
* Team won League Pennant
P Pitcher (RHP indicates right-handed; LHP indicates left-handed)
C Catcher
1B First baseman
2B Second baseman
3B Third baseman
SS Shortstop
OF Outfielder
DH Designated hitter

See also

Notes

  • a A player is considered inactive if he has announced his retirement or not played for a full season.
  • b A unanimous victory indicates that the player received all possible first-place votes.
  • c Torre is a member of the Hall of Fame, but not as a player. He was inducted in 2014 as a manager.[128]
  • d Hernandez and Stargell both received 216 points in the 1979 voting.[12]

References

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External links

1946 National League tie-breaker series

The 1946 National League tie-breaker series was a best-of-three playoff series at the conclusion of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 1946 regular season to decide the winner of the National League (NL) pennant. The games were played on October 1 and October 3, 1946, between the St. Louis Cardinals and Brooklyn Dodgers. It was necessary after both teams finished the season with identical win–loss records of 96–58. This was the first ever tie-breaker series in MLB history. The Cardinals won the regular reason series, 16-8.

The first game took place at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis, and the second, at Brooklyn's Ebbets Field. The Cardinals swept the Dodgers behind wins from pitchers Howie Pollet and Murry Dickson, thus advancing to the 1946 World Series in which they defeated the Boston Red Sox, four games to three. In baseball statistics, the tie-breaker series counted as the 155th and 156th regular season games by both teams, with all events in the games added to regular season statistics.

1948 American League tie-breaker game

The 1948 American League tie-breaker game was a one-game extension to Major League Baseball's (MLB) 1948 regular season, played between the Cleveland Indians and Boston Red Sox to determine the winner of the American League (AL) pennant. The game was played on October 4, 1948, at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts. It was necessary after both teams finished the season with identical win–loss records of 96–58. This was the first-ever one-game playoff in the AL, and the only one before 1969 when the leagues were split into divisions.

The Indians defeated the Red Sox, 8–3, as the Indians scored four runs in the fourth inning and limited the Red Sox to five hits. The Indians advanced to the 1948 World Series, where they defeated the Boston Braves, four games to two, giving them their second and most recent World Series championship. In baseball statistics, the tie-breaker counted as the 155th regular season game by both teams, with all events in the game added to regular season statistics.

1951 National League tie-breaker series

The 1951 National League tie-breaker series was a best-of-three playoff series at the conclusion of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 1951 regular season to decide the winner of the National League (NL) pennant. The games were played on October 1, 2, and 3, 1951, between the New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers. It was necessary after both teams finished the season with identical win–loss records of 96–58. It is most famous for the walk-off home run hit by Bobby Thomson of the Giants in the deciding game, which has come to be known as baseball's "Shot Heard 'Round the World".

This was the second three-game playoff in NL history. After no tiebreakers had been needed since the American League (AL) became a major league in 1901, this was the third such tie in the previous six seasons. The Dodgers had been involved in the previous one as well, losing to the St. Louis Cardinals during the 1946 season in two straight games. In addition to the 1946 series, the AL had a one-game playoff in 1948.

The Giants won game one, while the Dodgers came back to win game two. After trailing for most of game three, the Giants rallied to win the game and the series. Consequently, they advanced to the 1951 World Series, in which they were defeated by the New York Yankees. In baseball statistics, the tie-breaker series counted as the 155th, 156th, and 157th regular season games by both teams; all events in the games were added to regular season statistics.

Bobby Doerr

Robert Pershing Doerr (April 7, 1918 – November 13, 2017) was an American professional baseball second baseman and coach. He played his entire 14-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career for the Boston Red Sox (1937–51). A nine-time MLB All-Star, Doerr batted over .300 three times, drove in more than 100 runs six times, and set Red Sox team records in several statistical categories despite missing one season due to military service during World War II. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986.

After he retired as a player, Doerr served as a scout and a coach; he worked with Carl Yastrzemski before his Triple Crown season. From April 25, 2017, until his death on November 13 of that year, Doerr was the oldest living former major league player. He was the last living person who played in the major leagues in the 1930s, and was the oldest of only three living people who made their MLB debut before U.S. involvement in World War II (the other two being Chuck Stevens and Fred Caligiuri).

Burt Hooton

Burt Carlton Hooton (born February 7, 1950), nicknamed "Happy", is an American former right-handed starting pitcher and former coach in Major League Baseball. He won 151 games over a 15-year career, mostly with the Chicago Cubs and Los Angeles Dodgers.

Hooton's career began auspiciously with a no-hitter in his fourth major league game for the Cubs, but he gained perhaps his widest recognition for his several playoff performances with the Dodgers. His only All-Star appearance was in 1981, when he also was named the NLCS Most Valuable Player on the way to helping the Dodgers to a World Series championship with four postseason wins in five appearances.

He is currently the pitching coach of the Fort Wayne TinCaps, the Class-A affiliate of the San Diego Padres.

Chalmers Award

Chalmers Award may refer to:

An early version of the Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award, presented from 1911 to 1914

a series of Canadian arts awards funded by the Chalmers family of arts patrons, including:

The Floyd S. Chalmers Canadian Play Award

The M. Joan Chalmers Awards for Arts Administration, Artistic Direction and Documentary Film and Video

Chalmers Medal awarded by the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

Christian Yelich

Christian Stephen Yelich (born December 5, 1991) is an American professional baseball outfielder for the Milwaukee Brewers Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Miami Marlins. Yelich was drafted out of Westlake high school by the Marlins in the 1st round (23rd overall) of the 2010 Major League Baseball Draft. He bats left-handed and throws right-handed. He is one of four players in Brewers history to win the Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award.

Frank Schulte

Frank M. "Wildfire" Schulte (September 17, 1882 – October 2, 1949) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Chicago Cubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies, and Washington Senators from 1904 to 1918. He helped the Cubs win four National League (NL) championships and two World Series. In 1911, he won the NL Chalmers Award, the precursor to the Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award.

International League Most Valuable Player Award

The International League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) is an annual award given to the best player in minor league baseball's International League. Managers from the 14 International League teams vote for the winner of the award, which is then combined with 14 votes from various general managers, broadcasters, and media representatives around the league to determine a winner. In 1932, Marv Owen won the first ever International League MVP Award.

First basemen, with 23 winners, have won the most among infielders, followed by third basemen (16), shortstops (9), and second basemen (5). Five catchers have won the award. Twenty-nine outfielders have won the MVP Award, the most of any position. A total of 4 pitchers have won the MVP award. The last pitcher to win was Red Barrett in 1942. The International League League now has a Most Valuable Pitcher Award, which was established in 1953. Rocky Nelson has the record for most MVP Award wins with three (1953, 1955, and 1958). Roberto Petagine has won the MVP Award twice.

Three International League MVP Award winners, Red Schoendienst, Jim Rice, and Jim Thome, have gone on to be inducted in the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Jim Gilliam

James William "Junior" Gilliam (October 17, 1928 – October 8, 1978) was an American second baseman, third baseman, and coach in Negro League and Major League Baseball who spent his entire major league career with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers. He was named the 1953 National League Rookie of the Year, and was a key member of ten National League championship teams from 1953 to 1978. As the Dodgers' leadoff hitter for most of the 1950s, he scored over 100 runs in each of his first four seasons and led the National League in triples in 1953 and walks in 1959. Upon retirement, he became one of the first African-American coaches in the major leagues.

Lloyd Moseby

Lloyd Anthony Moseby (born November 5, 1959) is a former Major League Baseball player. A center fielder, and good all-around athlete, Moseby's nickname, Shaker, was said to stem from his ability to get away from or "shake" players who attempted to defend him on the basketball court.

Milwaukee Brewers Wall of Honor

The Milwaukee Brewers Wall of Honor was established in 2014 to commemorate Brewers players who have made significant contributions to the team. Retired players who have met any one of seven conditions while playing for the Brewers will be enshrined in to the Wall of Honor. Active players will be enshrined upon retirement. These criteria include 2,000 or more plate appearances, 1,000 or more innings pitched, 250 or more games pitched, winning of a major award (Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award, Cy Young Award, Rookie of the Year Award, or Fireman of the Year Award), managing a pennant-winning team, being recognized with a statue on the Miller Park Plaza, and being elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame.The inaugural class consisted of 58 members. Players who have met the requirements for induction since that time are: John Axford, Ryan Braun, Yovani Gallardo, Carlos Gómez, Trevor Hoffman, Jeremy Jeffress, J. J. Hardy, Jonathan Lucroy, Francisco Rodriguez, Rickie Weeks and Christian Yelich.

Mission president

Mission president is a priesthood leadership position in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). A mission president presides over a geographic area known as a mission and the missionaries serving in the mission. Depending on the particular mission, a mission president may also be the presiding priesthood leader of some or all Latter-day Saints within the geographic boundaries of the mission. Mission presidents are ordained high priests of the church.

Paul Goldschmidt

Paul Edward Goldschmidt (born September 10, 1987), nicknamed "Goldy", is an American professional baseball first baseman for the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball (MLB). He made his MLB debut with the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2011. Prior to playing professionally, Goldschmidt played baseball for The Woodlands High School and Texas State Bobcats.

Goldschmidt was lightly recruited out of The Woodlands. After playing at Texas State, the Diamondbacks selected him in the eighth round of the 2009 MLB draft. He rose through the minor leagues, reaching the major leagues on August 1, 2011. The Diamondbacks traded him to the Cardinals during the 2018–19 offseason.

Goldschmidt is a six-time MLB All-Star. He led the National League in home runs and runs batted in during the 2013 season. He has won the National League (NL) Hank Aaron Award, Gold Glove Award, and Silver Slugger Award. Goldschmidt has also twice finished runner-up for the NL Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award, in 2013 and 2015.

Relief pitcher

In baseball and softball, a relief pitcher or reliever is a pitcher who enters the game after the starting pitcher is removed due to injury, ineffectiveness, fatigue, ejection, or for other strategic reasons, such as inclement weather delays or pinch hitter substitutions. Relief pitchers are further divided informally into various roles, such as closers, setup men, middle relief pitchers, left/right-handed specialists, and long relievers. Whereas starting pitchers usually rest several days before pitching in a game again due to the number of pitches thrown, relief pitchers are expected to be more flexible and typically pitch more games but with fewer innings pitched. A team's staff of relievers is normally referred to metonymically as a team's bullpen, which refers to the area where the relievers sit during games, and where they warm-up prior to entering the game.

Sporting News Player of the Year Award

This is a list of the Major League Baseball players awarded by Sporting News (formerly TSN, now SN) since 1936 as recipients of the Sporting News Player of the Year Award.

Sy Sanborn

Irving Ellis Sanborn (November 28, 1866 – July 18, 1934) was an American sports writer. He was familiarly known as Sy Sanborn.Sanborn was one of the most renowned baseball journalists in the early days of the 20th century. He was featured writer at the Springfield Union News for twelve years, before joining the Chicago Tribune during more than two decades. In addition, Sanborn was one of the organizers of the Baseball Writers' Association of America, being one of the forty-three founding members of that organization established in 1908.

Wins Above Replacement

Wins Above Replacement or Wins Above Replacement Player, commonly abbreviated to WAR or WARP, is a non-standardized sabermetric baseball statistic developed to sum up "a player's total contributions to his team". A player's WAR value is claimed to be the number of additional wins his team has achieved above the number of expected team wins if that player were substituted with a replacement-level player: a player who may be added to the team for minimal cost and effort.Individual WAR values are calculated from the number and success rate of on-field actions by a player (in batting, baserunning, fielding, and pitching), with higher values reflecting larger contributions to a team's success. WAR value also depends on what position a player plays, with more value going to weaker hitting positions like catcher than positions with strong hitting such as first base. A high WAR value built up by a player reflects successful performance, a large quantity of playing time, or both.

For example, Fangraphs rates Clayton Kershaw's 2014 regular season performance at 7.2 WAR, suggesting his team won roughly seven more games than would be expected if his innings had been pitched by a replacement level player. Kershaw achieved this high WAR total by pitching many innings while maintaining a high rate of strikeouts and low rates of home runs and walks.

Team
Individual
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American League MVP Award
National League MVP Award

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