Major League Baseball Manager of the Year Award

In Major League Baseball, the Manager of the Year Award is an honor given annually since 1983 to the best managers in the American League (AL) and the National League (NL). The winner is voted on by 30 members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA). Each places a vote for first, second, and third place among the managers of each league.[a] The manager with the highest score in each league wins the award.[1]

Several managers have won the award in a season when they led their team to 100 or more wins. Lou Piniella won 116 games with the Seattle Mariners in 2001,[2] the most by a winning manager, and Joe Torre won 114 with the New York Yankees in 1998.[3] Sparky Anderson and Tony La Russa finished with identical 104–58 records in 1984 and 1988, respectively.[4][5] Three National League managers, including Dusty Baker, Whitey Herzog, and Larry Dierker, have exceeded the century mark as well. Baker's San Francisco Giants won 103 games in 1993;[6] Dierker's 1998 Houston Astros won 102 and Herzog led the Cardinals to 101 wins in the award's third season.[7][8]

In 1991, Bobby Cox became the first manager to win the award in both leagues, winning with the Atlanta Braves and having previously won with the Toronto Blue Jays in 1985.[9] La Russa, Piniella, Jim Leyland, Bob Melvin, Davey Johnson, and Joe Maddon have since won the award in both leagues.[2][4][10] Cox and La Russa have won the most awards, with four.[4][9] Baker, Leyland, Piniella, Showalter and Maddon have won three times.[2][6][10] In 2005, Cox became the first manager to win the award in consecutive years.[9] Bob Melvin and Brian Snitker are the most recent winners.

Because of the 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike cut the season short and cancelled the post-season, the BBWAA writers effectively created a de facto mythical national championship (similar to college football) by naming managers of the unofficial league champions (lead the leagues in winning percentage) (Buck Showalter and Felipe Alou) as Managers of the Year.[11][12] Two franchises, the New York Mets and the Milwaukee Brewers, have not had a manager win the award.

Only six managers have won the award while leading a team that finished outside the top two spots in its division. Ted Williams was the first, after leading the "expansion" Washington Senators to a third-place finish (and, at 86-76, their only winning season) in the American League East, in 1969. Buck Rodgers won the award in 1987 with the third-place Expos.[13] Tony Peña and Showalter won the award with third-place teams in back-to-back years: Peña with the Royals in 2003, and Showalter with the Rangers in 2004.[14][15] Joe Girardi is the only manager to win the award with a fourth-place team (2006 Florida Marlins);[16] he is also the only manager to win the award after fielding a team with a losing record.

Lou Piniella - 2008 - cropped
Lou Piniella won the 2008 National League Manager of the Year Award, and won twice in the American League.

Key

dagger Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame
^
Indicates multiple award winners in the same year
(#) Number of wins by managers who have won the award multiple times
Year Each year links to that particular Major League Baseball season
Bold The manager's team won the World Series in the same season

Winners

American League

The skipper, Joe Maddon lr
Joe Maddon (2008 and 2011 AL Manager of the Year; 2015 NL Manager of the Year)
Ron Gardenhire 2006
Ron Gardenhire (2010 AL Manager of the Year). Gardenhire had previously finished as the runner-up for the award five times, tied for the most with Tony LaRussa.
Bob Melvin getting ejected
Bob Melvin (2007 NL Manager of the Year; 2012, 2018 AL Manager of the Year)
Jim Leyland
Jim Leyland (1990 and 1992 NL Manager of the Year; 2006 AL Manager of the Year)
Year Manager Team Division Finish Record
1983
Tony La Russa (1) Chicago White Sox West 1st
99–63
1984
Sparky Anderson (1) Detroit Tigers East 1st
104–58
1985
Bobby Cox (1) Toronto Blue Jays East 1st
99–62
1986
John McNamara Boston Red Sox East 1st
95–66
1987
Sparky Anderson (2) Detroit Tigers East 1st
98–64
1988
Tony La Russa (2) Oakland Athletics West 1st
104–58
1989
Frank Robinson Baltimore Orioles East 2nd
87–75
1990
Jeff Torborg Chicago White Sox West 2nd
94–68
1991
Tom Kelly Minnesota Twins West 1st
95–67
1992
Tony La Russa (3) Oakland Athletics West 1st
96–66
1993
Gene Lamont Chicago White Sox West 1st
94–68
1994[b]
Buck Showalter (1) New York Yankees East 1st
70–43
1995
Lou Piniella (1) Seattle Mariners West 1st
79–66
1996^[c]
Johnny Oates Texas Rangers West 1st
90–72
1996^[c]
Joe Torre New York Yankees East 1st
92–70
1997
Davey Johnson (1) Baltimore Orioles East 1st
98–64
1998
Joe Torre (2) New York Yankees East 1st
114–48
1999
Jimy Williams Boston Red Sox East 2nd
94–68
2000
Jerry Manuel Chicago White Sox Central 1st
95–67
2001
Lou Piniella (2) Seattle Mariners West 1st
116–46
2002
Mike Scioscia Anaheim Angels West 2nd
99–63
2003
Tony Peña Kansas City Royals Central 3rd
83–79
2004
Buck Showalter (2) Texas Rangers West 3rd
89–73
2005
Ozzie Guillén Chicago White Sox Central 1st
99–63
2006
Jim Leyland (3) Detroit Tigers Central 2nd
95–67
2007
Eric Wedge Cleveland Indians Central 1st
96–66
2008
Joe Maddon (1) Tampa Bay Rays East 1st
97–65
2009
Mike Scioscia (2) Los Angeles Angels West 1st
97–65
2010
Ron Gardenhire Minnesota Twins Central 1st
94–68
2011
Joe Maddon (2) Tampa Bay Rays East 2nd
91–71
2012
Bob Melvin (2) Oakland Athletics West 1st
94–68
2013
Terry Francona Cleveland Indians Central 2nd
92–70
2014
Buck Showalter (3) Baltimore Orioles East 1st
96–66
2015
Jeff Banister Texas Rangers West 1st
88–74
2016
Terry Francona (2) Cleveland Indians Central 1st
94–67
2017
Paul Molitor Minnesota Twins Central 2nd
85–77
2018
Bob Melvin (3) Oakland Athletics West 2nd
97–65

National League

Year Manager Team Division Finish Record
1983
Tommy Lasorda (1) Los Angeles Dodgers West 1st
91–71
1984
Jim Frey (1) Chicago Cubs East 1st
96–65
1985
Whitey Herzog St. Louis Cardinals East 1st
101–61
1986
Hal Lanier Houston Astros West 1st
96–66
1987
Buck Rodgers Montréal Expos East 3rd
91–71
1988
Tommy Lasorda (2) Los Angeles Dodgers West 1st
94–67
1989
Don Zimmer Chicago Cubs (2) East 1st
93–69
1990
Jim Leyland (1) Pittsburgh Pirates East 1st
95–67
1991
Bobby Cox (2) Atlanta Braves West 1st
94–68
1992
Jim Leyland (2) Pittsburgh Pirates (2) East 1st
96–66
1993
Dusty Baker (1) San Francisco Giants West 2nd
103–59
1994[b]
Felipe Alou Montréal Expos (2) East 1st
74–40
1995
Don Baylor Colorado Rockies West 2nd
77–67
1996
Bruce Bochy San Diego Padres West 1st
91–71
1997
Dusty Baker (2) San Francisco Giants (2) West 1st
90–72
1998
Larry Dierker Houston Astros (2) Central 1st
102–60
1999
Jack McKeon (1) Cincinnati Reds Central 2nd
96–67
2000
Dusty Baker (3) San Francisco Giants West 1st
97–65
2001
Larry Bowa Philadelphia Phillies East 2nd
86–76
2002
Tony La Russa (4) St. Louis Cardinals (2) Central 1st
97–65
2003
Jack McKeon (2) Florida Marlins East 2nd
75–49
2004
Bobby Cox (3) Atlanta Braves (2) East 1st
96–66
2005
Bobby Cox (4) Atlanta Braves (3) East 1st
90–72
2006
Joe Girardi Florida Marlins (2) East 4th
78–84
2007
Bob Melvin (1) Arizona Diamondbacks West 1st
90–72
2008
Lou Piniella (3) Chicago Cubs (3) Central 1st
97–64
2009
Jim Tracy Colorado Rockies (2) West 2nd
92–70
2010
Bud Black San Diego Padres (2) West 2nd
90–72
2011
Kirk Gibson Arizona Diamondbacks (2) West 1st
94–68
2012
Davey Johnson (2) Washington Nationals East 1st
98–64
2013
Clint Hurdle Pittsburgh Pirates (3) Central 2nd
94–68
2014
Matt Williams Washington Nationals (2) East 1st
96–66
2015
Joe Maddon (3) Chicago Cubs (4) Central 3rd
97–65
2016
Dave Roberts Los Angeles Dodgers (2) West 1st
91–71
2017
Torey Lovullo Arizona Diamondbacks (3) West 2nd
93–69
2018
Brian Snitker Atlanta Braves (4) East 1st
90–72

Notes

See also

References

General
  • "Manager of the Year Award Winners". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  • "MLB Awards (Manager of the Year Award Winners)". Major League Baseball. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
Inline citations
  1. ^ Castrovince, Anthony; Beck, Jason (November 14, 2007). "Wedge named AL's top manager". Major League Baseball. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  2. ^ a b c "Lou Piniella Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  3. ^ "Joe Torre Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  4. ^ a b c "Tony La Russa Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  5. ^ "Sparky Anderson Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  6. ^ a b "Dusty Baker Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  7. ^ "Larry Dierker Managerial Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  8. ^ "Whitey Herzog Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  9. ^ a b c "Bobby Cox Managerial Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  10. ^ a b "Jim Leyland Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  11. ^ "Buck Showalter Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  12. ^ "Felipe Alou Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  13. ^ "1987 Montreal Expos Batting, Pitching, & Fielding Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  14. ^ "2003 Kansas City Royals Batting, Pitching, & Fielding Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  15. ^ "2004 Texas Rangers Batting, Pitching, & Fielding Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  16. ^ "2006 Florida Marlins Batting, Pitching, & Fielding Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  17. ^ "2008 NL Manager of the Year Voting". ESPN.com. Associated Press. November 12, 2008. Retrieved June 1, 2009.
  18. ^ Spira, Greg (October 28, 2004). "Internet Baseball Awards". Baseball Prospectus. Retrieved June 1, 2009.
  19. ^ Bryant, Howard (2005). Juicing the Game. Penguin Group. p. 53. ISBN 0-670-03445-2.
  20. ^ "MLB Awards (Manager of the Year Award Winners)". Major League Baseball. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
Associated Press

The Associated Press (AP) is a U.S.-based not-for-profit news agency headquartered in New York City. Founded in 1846, it operates as a cooperative, unincorporated association. Its members are U.S. newspapers and broadcasters. Its Statement of News Values and Principles spells out its standards and practices.The AP has earned 52 Pulitzer Prizes, including 31 for photography, since the award was established in 1917.

The AP has counted the vote in U.S. elections since 1848, including national, state and local races down to the legislative level in all 50 states, along with key ballot measures. AP collects and verifies returns in every county, parish, city and town across the U.S., and declares winners in over 5,000 contests.

The AP news report, distributed to its members and customers, is produced in English, Spanish and Arabic. AP content is also available on the agency's app, AP News. A 2017 study by NewsWhip revealed that AP content was more engaged with on Facebook than content from any individual English-language publisher.As of 2016, news collected by the AP was published and republished by more than 1,300 newspapers and broadcasters. The AP operates 263 news bureaus in 106 countries. It also operates the AP Radio Network, which provides newscasts twice hourly for broadcast and satellite radio and television stations. Many newspapers and broadcasters outside the United States are AP subscribers, paying a fee to use AP material without being contributing members of the cooperative. As part of their cooperative agreement with the AP, most member news organizations grant automatic permission for the AP to distribute their local news reports. The AP employs the "inverted pyramid" formula for writing which enables the news outlets to edit a story to fit its available publication area without losing the story's essentials.

Cutbacks at rival United Press International in 1993 left the AP as the United States' primary news service, although UPI still produces and distributes stories and photos daily. Other English-language news services, such as the BBC, Reuters and the English-language service of Agence France-Presse, are based outside the United States.

Atlanta Braves award winners and league leaders

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Best Coach/Manager ESPY Award

The Best Coach/Manager ESPY Award has been presented annually since 1993 to the head coach or manager of a team contesting play in a professional North American or collegiate sports league adjudged to be the best in a given calendar year.

Between 1993 and 2004, the award voting panel comprised variously fans; sportswriters and broadcasters, sports executives, and retired sportspersons, termed collectively experts; and ESPN personalities, but balloting thereafter has been exclusively by fans over the Internet from amongst choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee.

Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in July and reflect performance from the June previous.

Charlie Manuel

Charles Fuqua Manuel, Jr. (born January 4, 1944) is an American baseball executive for the Philadelphia Phillies, and a former professional baseball outfielder, coach, and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB); and a Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) player. During his playing career, he appeared over parts of six MLB seasons for the Minnesota Twins and Los Angeles Dodgers before playing another six seasons in NPB with the Yakult Swallows and Kintetsu Buffaloes. Over four successive seasons in NPB, he hit at least .312 with 37 home runs each season and won the 1979 Pacific League Most Valuable Player Award. After his playing career, Manuel coached and managed the Cleveland Indians and managed the Philadelphia Phillies, winning the World Series in 2008. He now serves as the senior advisor to the Phillies’ General Manager.

Chuck Tanner

Charles William Tanner (July 4, 1928 – February 11, 2011) was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played as a left fielder in Major League Baseball. He was known for his unwavering confidence and infectious optimism. He managed the Pittsburgh Pirates to a World Series championship in 1979. He last served as a senior adviser to Pirates general manager Neal Huntington.

Chuck Tanner Baseball Manager of the Year Award

The Chuck Tanner Baseball Manager of the Year Award is the original name for two awards that are given by the Rotary Club of Pittsburgh, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is named for Chuck Tanner, former manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates, and was first awarded on November 17, 2007 at the city's Rivers Club. For the first three years, the award was given to a manager in Major League Baseball. In 2010, a second award was presented to the "Chuck Tanner Collegiate Baseball Manager of the Year"; the original award was renamed the "Chuck Tanner Major League Baseball Manager of the Year Award".

During the selection process, a major factor for the committee is each candidate's career achievement.Proceeds from the annual awards dinner in November are used by the Club to support its humanitarian service initiatives and Rotary Foundation programs.

Jimy Williams

James Francis "Jimy" Williams (born October 4, 1943) is an American former professional baseball infielder, coach and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB). He was born in Santa Maria, California, and briefly appeared in two MLB seasons as a second baseman and shortstop for the St. Louis Cardinals. After his playing career, he managed in the California Angels' minor league system before managing at the MLB level for the Toronto Blue Jays (1986–89), Boston Red Sox (1997–2001) and Houston Astros (2002–04), and was the American League Manager of the Year in 1999. He has also coached for Toronto, the Atlanta Braves and Philadelphia Phillies.

Joe Maddon

Joseph John Maddon Jr. (born February 8, 1954) is an American professional baseball manager for the Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball (MLB). Maddon began his coaching career in MLB with the California Angels in 1993 and served under managers Buck Rodgers, Marcel Lachemann, John McNamara, Terry Collins, and Mike Scioscia. He served two stints as interim manager during this time. He managed the Tampa Bay Rays from 2006 through 2014, winning the 2008 American League pennant. After opting out of his contract following the 2014 season, he joined the Cubs, led them to the 2015 National League Championship Series and was named the 2015 National League Manager of the Year. In 2016, Maddon managed the Cubs to their first World Series title since 1908, which they won against the Cleveland Indians. Known for his "tell it as it is style", he is not afraid to stick his neck out for his players and subsequently get thrown out of the game.

List of Philadelphia Phillies award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Philadelphia Phillies professional baseball team.

Los Angeles Dodgers award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Los Angeles Dodgers professional baseball franchise, including its years in Brooklyn (1883–1957).

Manager (baseball)

In baseball, the field manager (commonly referred to as the manager) is the equivalent of a head coach who is responsible for overseeing and making final decisions on all aspects of on-field team strategy, lineup selection, training and instruction. Managers are typically assisted by a staff of assistant coaches whose responsibilities are specialized. Field managers are typically not involved in off-field personnel decisions or long-term club planning, responsibilities that are instead held by a team's general manager.

Manager of the Year

Manager of the Year may refer to:

Major League Baseball Manager of the Year Award

League Managers Association Manager of the Year

Premier League Manager of the Season

Miami Marlins award winners and league leaders

The Miami Marlins are a professional baseball team that has played in the National League since the team's founding in 1993. Major League Baseball offers several awards at the end of each season to commemorate the achievement of individual players. The Most Valuable Player award is generally given to the player who had the greatest impact on the success of his team, whether that be in the regular season, the postseason, or the All-Star game. The Cy Young Award is a prize awarded to the pitcher who is perceived to have had the best regular season. The Gold Glove Awards are presented to players who are recognized as being the best at fielding their respective positions during the regular season, while their counterparts the Silver Slugger is awarded to the best hitter at each respective position. The Rookie of the year is presented to the player recognized as the best newcomer to the league, while the Manager of the Year is given to the coach perceived to have had the greatest impact on his team's success.

Minnesota Twins award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Minnesota Twins professional baseball team.

Oakland Athletics award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Oakland Athletics professional baseball franchise.

The team was first known as the Philadelphia Athletics from 1901 to 1954 and then as the Kansas City Athletics from 1955 to 1967.

Ron Gardenhire

Ronald Clyde Gardenhire (born October 24, 1957) is an American professional baseball player, coach, and current manager for the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He played as a shortstop for the New York Mets from 1981 through 1985. He managed the Minnesota Twins from 2002 through 2014. He served as a coach for the Twins from 1991 through 2001, and for the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2017. He won the American League Manager of the Year Award in 2010.

Sporting News Manager of the Year Award

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Tampa Bay Rays award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Tampa Bay Rays professional baseball team.

Texas Rangers award winners and league leaders

This article does not include the franchise's first eleven years (1961–1971), as the Washington Senators.This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Texas Rangers baseball team.

American League Manager of the Year Award
National League Manager of the Year Award
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