Major League Baseball All-Time Team

The Major League Baseball All-Time Team was chosen in 1997 to comprise the top manager and top player in each of 13 positional categories across Major League Baseball history. The team, announced by Classic Sports Network in conjunction with the events celebrated around the 1997 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, were chosen by a panel of 36 members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America in a first- and second-place Borda count voting system.

Position First-team
selection
Team(s) represented
by season
Year of
induction into
National
Baseball

Hall of Fame
Total
votes
(First-team
votes)
Runner-up Team(s) represented
by season
Year of
induction into
National
Baseball

Hall of Fame
Total
votes
(First-team
votes)
Catcher Johnny Bench Cincinnati Reds (19671983) 1989 52 (24) Yogi Berra New York Yankees (19461963)
New York Mets (1965)
1972 22 (4)
First baseman Lou Gehrig New York Yankees (19231939) 1939 66½ (31) Jimmie Foxx Philadelphia Athletics (19251935)
Boston Red Sox (19361942[1])
Chicago Cubs (1942, 1944)
Philadelphia Phillies (1945)[2]
1951 19 (3)
Second baseman Rogers Hornsby St. Louis Cardinals (19151926, 1933[3])
New York Giants (1927)
Boston Braves (1928)
Chicago Cubs (19291932)
St. Louis Browns (19331937)
1942 44 (17) Joe Morgan Houston Astros (1963[4]1971, 1980)
Cincinnati Reds (19721979)
San Francisco Giants (19811982)
Philadelphia Phillies (1983)
Oakland Athletics (1984)
1990 23 (6)
Shortstop Honus Wagner Louisville Colonels (18971899)
Pittsburgh Pirates (19001917)
1936 55 (23) Cal Ripken, Jr. Baltimore Orioles (19812001) 2007 24 (6)
Third baseman Mike Schmidt Philadelphia Phillies (19721989) 1995 50 (21) Brooks Robinson Baltimore Orioles (19551977) 1983 37 (13)
Left fielder Ted Williams Boston Red Sox (19391942, 19461960) 1966 68 (32) Stan Musial St. Louis Cardinals (19411944, 19461963) 1969 36 (4)
Center fielder Willie Mays San Francisco Giants (19511952, 19541972[5][6])
New York Mets (19721973)
1979 57 (25) Ty Cobb Detroit Tigers (19051926)
Philadelphia Athletics (19271928)
1936 22 (7)
Right fielder Babe Ruth Boston Red Sox (19141919)
New York Yankees (19201934)
Boston Braves (1935)
1936 67 (31) Hank Aaron Milwaukee Braves (19541966
Atlanta Braves (19661975)
Milwaukee Brewers (19751976)
1982 36 (5)
Designated hitter Paul Molitor Milwaukee Brewers (19781992)
Toronto Blue Jays (19931995)
Minnesota Twins (19961998)
2004 48 (22) Harold Baines Chicago White Sox (19801989,[7] 19961997,[8] 20012002)
Texas Rangers (19891990[9])
Oakland Athletics (19901992)
Baltimore Orioles (19931995, 19971999,[10] 2000[11])
Cleveland Indians (1999)
2019 12 (3)
Right-handed starting pitcher Walter Johnson Washington Senators (19071927) 1936 30 (9) Cy Young Cleveland Spiders (18901898)
St. Louis Perfectos (18991900[12])
Boston Americans (19011908[13])
Cleveland Naps (19091911[14])
Boston Rustlers (1911)
1937 25 (12)
Left-handed starting pitcher Sandy Koufax Los Angeles Dodgers (1955[15]1966) 1972 32 (11) Warren Spahn Milwaukee Braves (1942, 1946[16]1964)
New York Mets (1965[17])
San Francisco Giants (1965)
1973 28 (11)
Relief pitcher Dennis Eckersley Cleveland Indians (19751977)
Boston Red Sox (19781984,[18] 1998)
Chicago Cubs (19841986)
Oakland Athletics (19871995)
St. Louis Cardinals (19961997)
2004 40 (16) Rollie Fingers Oakland Athletics (19681976)
San Diego Padres (19771980)
Milwaukee Brewers (19811982, 19841985)
1992 29 (9)
Manager Casey Stengel Brooklyn Dodgers (19341936)
Boston Braves (19381943)
New York Yankees (19491960)
New York Mets (19621965)
1966 22 (6) Joe McCarthy Chicago Cubs (19261930)
New York Yankees (19311946)
Boston Red Sox (19481950)
1957 18 (6)

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Foxx was released by the Red Sox during the 1942 season and was claimed on waivers by the Chicago Cubs; he ultimately contested 30 games for the Red Sox and 70 for the Cubs.
  2. ^ Foxx returned to Philadelphia for the final year of his career by joining the National League Phillies after making his major league debut with the cross-town Philadelphia Athletics. http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/player.php?p=foxxji01
  3. ^ Hornsby was released by the Cardinals during the 1933 season and was claimed on waivers by the St. Louis Browns; he ultimately contested 46 games for the Cardinals and 46 for the Browns.
  4. ^ During Morgan's first two seasons, the Astros franchise were styled as the Houston Colt .45's.
  5. ^ During Mays's first six seasons, the Giants were styled as the New York Giants; the franchise relocated prior to the commencement of the 1958 season.
  6. ^ Mays was traded during the 1972 season; he ultimately contested 19 games for the Giants and 69 for the New York Mets.
  7. ^ Baines was traded during the 1989 season; he ultimately contested 96 games for the White Sox and 50 for the Texas Rangers.
  8. ^ Baines was traded during the 1997 season; he ultimately contested 93 games for the White Sox and 44 for the Baltimore Orioles.
  9. ^ Baines was traded during the 1990 season; he ultimately contested 103 games for the Rangers and 32 for the Oakland Athletics.
  10. ^ Baines was traded during the 1999 season; he ultimately contested 107 games for the Orioles and 28 for the Cleveland Indians.
  11. ^ Baines was traded during the 2000 season; he ultimately contested 72 games for the Orioles and 24 for the Chicago White Sox.
  12. ^ In the 1900 season, the Perfectos franchise were styled as the St. Louis Cardinals.
  13. ^ During the 1907 and 1908 seasons, the Americans franchise were styled as the Boston Red Sox.
  14. ^ Young was released by the Naps during the 1911 season and claimed on waivers by the Boston Rustlers; he ultimately contested seven games for the Naps and eleven for the Rustlers.
  15. ^ During Koufax's first three seasons, the Dodgers were styled as the Brooklyn Dodgers; the franchise relocated prior to the commencement of the 1958 season.
  16. ^ During Spahn's first eight seasons, the Braves were styled as the Boston Braves; the franchise relocated prior to the commencement of the 1954 season.
  17. ^ Spahn was released by the Mets during the 1965 season and claimed on waivers by the San Francisco Giants; he ultimately contested 20 games for the Mets and 16 for the Giants.
  18. ^ Eckersley was traded during the 1984 season; he ultimately contested nine games for the Red Sox and twenty-four for the Chicago Cubs.

References

  • Brown, Gerry, and Morrison, Michael (eds.; 2003). ESPN Information Please Sports Almanac. New York City: ESPN Books and Hyperion (joint). ISBN 0-7868-8715-X.
Atlanta Braves award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Atlanta Braves professional baseball franchise, including its years in Boston (1871–1952) and Milwaukee (1953–1965).

Babe Ruth

George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948) was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting (and some pitching) records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter still stands as of 2019. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.

At age 7, Ruth was sent to St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys, a reformatory where he learned life lessons and baseball skills from Brother Matthias Boutlier of the Xaverian Brothers, the school's disciplinarian and a capable baseball player. In 1914, Ruth was signed to play minor-league baseball for the Baltimore Orioles but was soon sold to the Red Sox. By 1916, he had built a reputation as an outstanding pitcher who sometimes hit long home runs, a feat unusual for any player in the pre-1920 dead-ball era. Although Ruth twice won 23 games in a season as a pitcher and was a member of three World Series championship teams with the Red Sox, he wanted to play every day and was allowed to convert to an outfielder. With regular playing time, he broke the MLB single-season home run record in 1919.

After that season, Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sold Ruth to the Yankees amid controversy. The trade fueled Boston's subsequent 86 year championship drought and popularized the "Curse of the Bambino" superstition. In his 15 years with the Yankees, Ruth helped the team win seven American League (AL) pennants and four World Series championships. His big swing led to escalating home run totals that not only drew fans to the ballpark and boosted the sport's popularity but also helped usher in baseball's live-ball era, which evolved from a low-scoring game of strategy to a sport where the home run was a major factor. As part of the Yankees' vaunted "Murderers' Row" lineup of 1927, Ruth hit 60 home runs, which extended his MLB single-season record by a single home run. Ruth's last season with the Yankees was 1934; he retired from the game the following year, after a short stint with the Boston Braves. During his career, Ruth led the AL in home runs during a season 12 times.

Ruth's legendary power and charismatic personality made him a larger-than-life figure during the Roaring Twenties. During his career, he was the target of intense press and public attention for his baseball exploits and off-field penchants for drinking and womanizing. His often reckless lifestyle was tempered by his willingness to do good by visiting children at hospitals and orphanages. After his retirement as a player, he was denied the opportunity to manage a major league club, most likely due to poor behavior during parts of his playing career. In his final years, Ruth made many public appearances, especially in support of American efforts in World War II. In 1946, he became ill with nasopharyngeal cancer and died from the disease two years later. Ruth remains a part of American culture and in 2018, President Donald Trump posthumously awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Baseball Writers' Association of America

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers, magazines and qualifying websites.

Cy Young Award

The Cy Young Award is given annually to the best pitchers in Major League Baseball (MLB), one each for the American League (AL) and National League (NL). The award was first introduced in 1956 by Baseball Commissioner Ford Frick in honor of Hall of Fame pitcher Cy Young, who died in 1955. The award was originally given to the single best pitcher in the major leagues, but in 1967, after the retirement of Frick, the award was given to one pitcher in each league.Each league's award is voted on by members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America, with one representative from each team. As of the 2010 season, each voter places a vote for first, second, third, fourth and fifth place among the pitchers of each league. The formula used to calculate the final scores is a weighted sum of the votes. The pitcher with the highest score in each league wins the award. If two pitchers receive the same number of votes, the award is shared. The current formula started in the 2010 season. Before that, dating back to 1970, writers voted for three pitchers, with the formula of 5 points for a first place vote, 3 for a second place vote and 1 for a third place vote. Prior to 1970, writers only voted for the best pitcher and used a formula of one point per vote.

Dennis Eckersley

Dennis Lee Eckersley (born October 3, 1954), nicknamed "Eck", is an American former professional baseball pitcher. Between 1975 and 1998, he pitched in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, Oakland Athletics, and St. Louis Cardinals. Eckersley had success as a starter, but gained his greatest fame as a closer, becoming the first of two pitchers in MLB history to have both a 20-win season and a 50-save season in a career. He is the pitcher who gave up a dramatic walk-off home run (a phrase Eckersley coined) to the injured Kirk Gibson in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series.

Eckersley was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2004, his first year of eligibility. He works with New England Sports Network (NESN) as a part-time color commentator for Red Sox broadcasts, and is also a game analyst for Turner Sports for their Sunday MLB Games and MLB Post Season coverage on TBS.

Honus Wagner

Johannes Peter "Honus" Wagner (; February 24, 1874 – December 6, 1955), sometimes referred to as "Hans" Wagner, was an American baseball shortstop who played 21 seasons in Major League Baseball from 1897 to 1917, almost entirely for the Pittsburgh Pirates. Wagner won his eighth (and final) batting title in 1911, a National League record that remains unbroken to this day, and matched only once, in 1997, by Tony Gwynn. He also led the league in slugging six times and stolen bases five times. Wagner was nicknamed "The Flying Dutchman" due to his superb speed and German heritage. This nickname was a nod to the popular folk-tale made into a famous opera by another Wagner.

In 1936, the Baseball Hall of Fame inducted Wagner as one of the first five members. He received the second-highest vote total, behind Ty Cobb and tied with Babe Ruth.

Most baseball historians consider Wagner to be the greatest shortstop ever and one of the greatest players ever. Ty Cobb himself called Wagner "maybe the greatest star ever to take the diamond." Honus Wagner is also the featured player of one of the rarest and the most valuable baseball cards in existence.

Johnny Bench

Johnny Lee Bench (born December 7, 1947) is an American former professional baseball catcher who played in the Major Leagues for the Cincinnati Reds from 1967 to 1983 and is a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Bench is a 14-time All-Star selection and a two-time National League Most Valuable Player. He was a key member of the Big Red Machine that won six division titles, four National League pennants, and two consecutive World Series championships. Known for his prowess on both offense and defense, ESPN has called him the greatest catcher in baseball history.

List of Boston Red Sox award winners

This is a list of award winners and single-season leaderboards for the Boston Red Sox professional baseball team.

List of Philadelphia Phillies award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Philadelphia Phillies professional baseball team.

Lou Gehrig

Henry Louis Gehrig (born Heinrich Ludwig Gehrig; June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941) was an American professional baseball first baseman who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees (1923–1939). Gehrig was renowned for his prowess as a hitter and for his durability, which earned him his nickname "The Iron Horse". He was an All-Star seven consecutive times, a Triple Crown winner once, an American League (AL) Most Valuable Player twice, and a member of six World Series champion teams. He had a career .340 batting average, .632 slugging average, and a .447 on base average. He hit 493 home runs and had 1,995 runs batted in (RBI). In 1939, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame and was the first MLB player to have his uniform number (4) retired by a team.

A native of New York City and a student at Columbia University, Gehrig signed with the Yankees in 1923. He set several major-league records during his career, including the most career grand slams (23) (since broken by Alex Rodriguez) and most consecutive games played (2,130), a record that stood for 56 years and was long considered unbreakable until surpassed by Cal Ripken, Jr., in 1995. Gehrig's consecutive game streak ended on May 2, 1939, when he voluntarily took himself out of the lineup, stunning both players and fans, after his performance on the field became hampered by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, an incurable neuromuscular illness; it is now commonly referred to in North America as "Lou Gehrig's disease". The disease forced him to retire at age 36, and was the cause of his death two years later. The pathos of his farewell from baseball was capped off by his iconic 1939 "Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth" speech at Yankee Stadium.

In 1969, the Baseball Writers' Association of America voted Gehrig the greatest first baseman of all time, and he was the leading vote-getter on the MLB All-Century Team chosen by fans in 1999. A monument in Gehrig's honor, originally dedicated by the Yankees in 1941, currently resides in Monument Park at Yankee Stadium. The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award is given annually to the MLB player who best exhibits Gehrig's integrity and character.

Major League Baseball All-Century Team

In 1999, the Major League Baseball All-Century Team was chosen by popular vote of fans. To select the team, a panel of experts first compiled a list of the 100 greatest Major League Baseball players from the past century. Over two million fans then voted on the players using paper and online ballots.The top two vote-getters from each position, except outfielders (nine), and the top six pitchers were placed on the team. A select panel then added five legends to create a thirty-man team:—Warren Spahn (who finished #10 among pitchers), Christy Mathewson (#14 among pitchers), Lefty Grove (#18 among pitchers), Honus Wagner (#4 among shortstops), and Stan Musial (#11 among outfielders).The nominees for the All-Century team were presented at the 1999 All-Star Game at Fenway Park. Preceding Game 2 of the 1999 World Series, the members of the All-Century Team were revealed. Every living player named to the team attended.

For the complete list of the 100 players nominated, see The MLB All-Century Team.

Mike Schmidt

Michael Jack Schmidt (born September 27, 1949) is an American former professional baseball third baseman who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies. Schmidt was a twelve-time All-Star and a three-time winner of the National League (NL) Most Valuable Player award (MVP), and he was known for his combination of power hitting and strong defense. As a hitter, he compiled 548 home runs and 1,595 runs batted in (RBIs), and led the NL in home runs eight times and in RBIs four times. As a fielder, Schmidt won the National League Gold Glove Award for third basemen ten times. Schmidt was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1995 and is often considered the greatest third baseman in baseball history.Having an unusual batting stance, Schmidt turned his back somewhat toward the pitcher and rocked his rear end back-and-forth while waiting for a pitch. By standing far back in the batter's box, he made it almost impossible to jam him by pitching inside. Schmidt was one of the best athletes of his era; teammate Pete Rose once said, "To have his body, I'd trade him mine and my wife's, and I'd throw in some cash."

New York Yankees award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the New York Yankees professional baseball team.

Paul Molitor

Paul Leo Molitor (born August 22, 1956), nicknamed "Molly" and "The Ignitor", is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) player and former manager of the Minnesota Twins, who is in the Baseball Hall of Fame. During his 21-year baseball career, he played for the Milwaukee Brewers (1978–92), Toronto Blue Jays (1993–95), and Minnesota Twins (1996–98). He was known for his exceptional hitting and speed. He made seven All-Star Game appearances, and was the World Series MVP in 1993.

Molitor grew up in Minnesota and attended the University of Minnesota before beginning his MLB career. Molitor served as a coach for the Seattle Mariners and the Twins after his retirement as a player. In 2004, he was elected to the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility, becoming one of the first players enshrined after spending a significant portion of his career as a designated hitter. He was a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. On November 3, 2014, Molitor was announced as the 13th manager of the Minnesota Twins. He managed the team for four seasons, and was fired in October 2018.

Sandy Koufax

Sanford Koufax (; born Sanford Braun; December 30, 1935) is an American professional baseball left-handed pitcher. He pitched 12 seasons for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1955 to 1966. Koufax, at age 36 in 1972, became the youngest player ever elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. He has been hailed as one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history.

Koufax's career peaked with a run of six outstanding years from 1961 to 1966, before arthritis in his left elbow ended his career prematurely at age 30. He was an All-Star for six seasons and was the National League's Most Valuable Player in 1963. He won three Cy Young Awards in 1963, 1965, and 1966, by unanimous votes, making him the first three-time Cy Young winner in baseball history and the only one to win three times when one overall award was given for all of major league baseball instead of one award for each league. Koufax also won the NL Triple Crown for pitchers those same three years by leading the NL in wins, strikeouts, and earned run average.Koufax was the first major league pitcher to pitch four no-hitters and the eighth pitcher to pitch a perfect game in baseball history. Despite his comparatively short career, Koufax's 2,396 career strikeouts ranked 7th in history as of his retirement, at the time trailing only Warren Spahn (2,583) among left-handers. Koufax, Trevor Hoffman, Randy Johnson, Pedro Martínez, and Nolan Ryan are the only five pitchers elected to the Hall of Fame who had more strikeouts than innings pitched.

Koufax is also remembered as one of the outstanding Jewish athletes in American sports. His decision not to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series because it fell on Yom Kippur garnered national attention as an example of conflict between professional pressures and personal beliefs.

Team of the century

In team sport, team of the century and team of the decade are hypothetical best teams over a given time period. For the century team, it can be either 100 years, or for a century (always the 20th). Similarly the team of the decade can be for 10 years or a decade (for example the 1980s).

Teams of the decade and century are selected for both leagues and clubs and sometimes selected for other reasons, such as to honour the contribution of a particular ethnic group.

Teams of the 20th century in particular have been controversial due to their loose criteria and the systemic bias toward current players, given that the performance of players before the advent of broadcasting of matches cannot be reviewed and relies on hearsay and archival records.

The Team of the Century concept used extensively in the sport of Australian rules football, where, since the mid-1990s, leagues (such as the VFL/AFL or SANFL), as well as football clubs, have named their best team (see Football (Australian rules) positions). Teams of the decades followed.

One of the most famous examples of the team of the century concept was in 1996, when the AFL Team of the Century was named on 2 September 1996, during the League's centenary season.An example from Ireland was when in 1984 the GAA selected their Football Team of the Century and Hurling Team of the Century to celebrate the first 100 years of the GAA. The term was used again in 2011 when the Team of Century from the Sigerson Cup was chosen.

Ted Williams

Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002) was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played his entire 19-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career as a left fielder for the Boston Red Sox from 1939 to 1960; his career was interrupted only by mandatory military service during World War II and the Korean War. Nicknamed The Kid, The Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame, and The Thumper, Williams is regarded as one of the greatest hitters in baseball history.

Williams was a nineteen-time All-Star, a two-time recipient of the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player Award, a six-time AL batting champion, and a two-time Triple Crown winner. He finished his playing career with a .344 batting average, 521 home runs, and a .482 on-base percentage, the highest of all time. His career batting average is the highest of any MLB player whose career was played primarily in the live-ball era, and ranks tied for 7th all-time (with Billy Hamilton).

Born and raised in San Diego, Williams played baseball throughout his youth. After joining the Red Sox in 1939, he immediately emerged as one of the sport's best hitters. In 1941, Williams posted a .406 batting average; he is the last MLB player to bat over .400 in a season. He followed this up by winning his first Triple Crown in 1942. Williams was required to interrupt his baseball career in 1943 to serve three years in the United States Navy and Marine Corps during World War II. Upon returning to MLB in 1946, Williams won his first AL MVP Award and played in his only World Series. In 1947, he won his second Triple Crown. Williams was returned to active military duty for portions of the 1952 and 1953 seasons to serve as a Marine combat aviator in the Korean War. In 1957 and 1958 at the ages of 39 and 40, respectively, he was the AL batting champion for the fifth and sixth time.

Williams retired from playing in 1960. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966, in his first year of eligibility. Williams managed the Washington Senators/Texas Rangers franchise from 1969 to 1972. An avid sport fisherman, he hosted a television program about fishing, and was inducted into the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame. Williams' involvement in the Jimmy Fund helped raise millions in dollars for cancer care and research. In 1991 President George H. W. Bush presented Williams with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award bestowed by the United States government. He was selected for the Major League Baseball All-Time Team in 1997 and the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999.

Walter Johnson

Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887 – December 10, 1946), nicknamed "Barney" and "The Big Train", was a Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. He played his entire 21-year baseball career for the Washington Senators (1907–1927). He later served as manager of the Senators from 1929 through 1932 and of the Cleveland Indians from 1933 through 1935.Often thought of as one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history, Johnson established several pitching records, some of which remain unbroken nine decades after he retired from baseball. He remains by far the all-time career leader in shutouts with 110, second in wins with 417, and fourth in complete games with 531. He held the career record in strikeouts for nearly 56 years, with 3,508, from the end of his career in 1927 until the 1983 season, when three players (Steve Carlton, Nolan Ryan and Gaylord Perry) finally passed the mark. Johnson was the only player in the 3,000 strikeout club (achieved 22 July 1923) for 51 years (less 5 days) until Bob Gibson recorded his 3,000th strikeout on 17 July 1974. Johnson led the league in strikeouts a Major League record twelve times—one more than current strikeout leader Nolan Ryan—including a record eight consecutive seasons. He is the only pitcher in major league history to record over 400 wins and strikeout over 3,500 batters.

In 1936, Johnson was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members. His gentle nature was legendary, and to this day he is held up as an example of good sportsmanship, while his name has become synonymous with friendly competition.

Willie Mays

Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931), nicknamed "The Say Hey Kid", is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) center fielder who spent almost all of his 22-season career playing for the New York/San Francisco Giants, before finishing with the New York Mets. He is regarded as one of the greatest baseball players of all time and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979.

Mays won two National League (NL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) awards, he ended his career with 660 home runs—third at the time of his retirement and currently fifth all-time—and won a record-tying 12 Gold Glove awards beginning in 1957, when the award was introduced.Mays shares the record of most All-Star Games played with 24, with Hank Aaron and Stan Musial. In appreciation of his All-Star record, Ted Williams said "They invented the All-Star Game for Willie Mays."Mays' career statistics and his longevity in the pre-performance-enhancing drugs era have drawn speculation that he may be the finest five-tool player ever, and many surveys and expert analyses, which have examined Mays' relative performance, have led to a growing opinion that Mays was possibly the greatest all-around offensive baseball player of all time. In 1999, Mays placed second on The Sporting News's "List of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players", making him the highest-ranking living player. Later that year, he was also elected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. Mays is one of five National League players to have had eight consecutive 100-RBI seasons, along with Mel Ott, Sammy Sosa, Chipper Jones, and Albert Pujols. Mays hit over 50 home runs in 1955 and 1965, representing the longest time span between 50-plus home run seasons for any player in Major League Baseball history. His final Major League Baseball appearance came on October 16 during Game 3 of the 1973 World Series.

Major League Baseball All-Time Team

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