Magdeburg

Magdeburg (German pronunciation: [ˈmakdəbʊɐ̯k] (listen); Low Saxon: Meideborg, [ˈmaˑɪdebɔɐ̯x]) is the capital city and the second largest city of the state of Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. It is situated on the Elbe River.

Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor and founder of the archbishopric of Magdeburg, was buried in the town's cathedral after his death. Magdeburg's version of German town law, known as Magdeburg rights, spread throughout Central and Eastern Europe. Until 1631, Magdeburg was one of the largest and most prosperous German cities, and a notable member of the Hanseatic League.

Magdeburg has been destroyed twice in its history. The Catholic League sacked Magdeburg in 1631, resulting in the death of 25,000 non-combatants, the largest loss of the Thirty Years' War. Allies bombed the city in 1945, destroying much of it.

Magdeburg is the site of two universities, the Otto-von-Guericke University and the Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Sciences.[3]

Magdeburg is situated on autobahn route 2, and hence is at the connection point of the East (Berlin and beyond) with the West of Europe, as well as the North and South of Germany. As a modern manufacturing centre, the production of chemical products, steel, paper and textiles are of particular economic significance, along with mechanical engineering and plant engineering, ecotechnology and life-cycle management, health management and logistics.

In 2005 Magdeburg celebrated its 1200th anniversary. In June 2013 Magdeburg was hit by record breaking flooding.[4]

Magdeburg
2010-06-23-md-hundertwasser-by-RalfR-07
Jahrtausendturm - Interior
From top:
Magdeburg Aerial Panorama,

Cathedral of Magdeburg from the other side of the Elbe, Green Citadel of Magdeburg, Interior of Jahrtausendturm and the city hall in 360°
Location of Magdeburg
Magdeburg is located in Germany
Magdeburg
Magdeburg
Magdeburg is located in Saxony-Anhalt
Magdeburg
Magdeburg
Coordinates: 52°8′0″N 11°37′0″E / 52.13333°N 11.61667°ECoordinates: 52°8′0″N 11°37′0″E / 52.13333°N 11.61667°E
CountryGermany
StateSaxony-Anhalt
DistrictUrban district
Subdivisions40 boroughs
Government
 • Lord MayorLutz Trümper (SPD)
Area
 • Total200.95 km2 (77.59 sq mi)
Elevation
43 m (141 ft)
Population
 (2017-12-31)[1]
 • Total238,478
 • Density1,200/km2 (3,100/sq mi)
Time zoneCET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes
39104–39130
Dialling codes0391
Vehicle registrationMD
Websitewww.magdeburg.de
Steuben Monument
Monument for General von Steuben, Drillmaster of the Continental Army during the American War of Independence

History

Ankunft Ottos I. und Ediths in Magdeburg
Kaiser Otto I and his wife Edith arrive near Magdeburg (Hugo Vogel 1898, Ständehaus Merseburg)
Largest groups of foreigners
Nationality Population (30.09.2018)
 Syria 5,139
 Romania 1,586
 Afghanistan 992
 Poland 967
 India 911
 Russia 816
 Vietnam 759
 China 636
 Turkey 533

Early years

Founded by Charlemagne in 805 as Magadoburg (probably from Old High German magado for big, mighty and burga for fortress[5]), the town was fortified in 919 by King Henry the Fowler against the Magyars and Slavs. In 929 King Otto I granted the city to his English-born wife Edith as dower. Queen Edith loved the town and often resided there;[6] at her death she was buried in the crypt of the Benedictine abbey of Saint Maurice, later rebuilt as the cathedral. In 937, Magdeburg was the seat of a royal assembly. Otto I repeatedly visited Magdeburg and was also buried in the cathedral. He granted the abbey the right to income from various tithes and to corvée labour from the surrounding countryside.

The Archbishopric of Magdeburg was founded in 968 at the synod of Ravenna; Adalbert of Magdeburg was consecrated as its first archbishop. The archbishopric under Adalbert included the bishoprics of Havelberg, Brandenburg, Merseburg, Meissen and Naumburg-Zeitz. The archbishops played a prominent role in the German colonisation of the Slavic lands east of the Elbe river.

In 1035 Magdeburg received a patent giving the city the right to hold trade exhibitions and conventions, which form the basis of the later family of city laws known as the Magdeburg rights. These laws were adopted and modified throughout Central and Eastern Europe. Visitors from many countries began to trade with Magdeburg.

In the 13th century, Magdeburg became a member of the Hanseatic League. With more than 20,000 inhabitants Magdeburg was one of the largest cities in the Holy Roman Empire. The town had an active maritime commerce on the west (towards Flanders), with the countries of the North Sea, and maintained traffic and communication with the interior (for example Brunswick).[6]

Reformation

The citizens constantly struggled against the archbishop, becoming nearly independent from him by the end of the 15th century. Around Easter 1497, the then twelve-year-old Martin Luther attended school in Magdeburg, where he was exposed to the teachings of the Brethren of the Common Life. In 1524, he was called to Magdeburg, where he preached and caused the city's defection from Roman Catholicism. The Protestant Reformation had quickly found adherents in the city, where Luther had been a schoolboy. Emperor Charles V repeatedly outlawed the unruly town, which had joined the League of Torgau and the Schmalkaldic League.[6]

As it had not accepted the Augsburg Interim decree (1548), the city, by the emperor's commands, was besieged (1550–1551) by Maurice, Elector of Saxony, but it retained its independence. The rule of the archbishop was replaced by that of various administrators belonging to Protestant dynasties. In the following years Magdeburg gained a reputation as a stronghold of Protestantism and became the first major city to publish the writings of Luther. In Magdeburg, Matthias Flacius and his companions wrote their anti-Catholic pamphlets and the Magdeburg Centuries, in which they argued that the Roman Catholic Church had become the kingdom of the Antichrist.[6]

In 1631, during the Thirty Years' War, imperial troops under Johann Tserclaes, Count of Tilly, stormed the city and massacred the inhabitants, killing about 20,000 and burning the town.[7]

The city had withstood a first siege in 1629 by Albrecht von Wallenstein, a Protestant convert to Catholicism. After the war, a population of only 4,000 remained. Under the Peace of Westphalia (1648), Magdeburg was to be assigned to Brandenburg-Prussia after the death of the administrator August of Saxe-Weissenfels, as the semi-autonomous Duchy of Magdeburg. This occurred in 1680.

19th century

In the course of the Napoleonic Wars, the fortress surrendered to French troops in 1806. The city was annexed to the French-controlled Kingdom of Westphalia in the 1807 Treaty of Tilsit. King Jérôme appointed Count Heinrich von Blumenthal as mayor. In 1815, after the Napoleonic Wars, Magdeburg was made the capital of the new Prussian Province of Saxony. In 1912, the old fortress was dismantled, and in 1908, the municipality Rothensee became part of Magdeburg.

20th century

Magdeburg was heavily bombed by British and American air forces during the Second World War. The RAF bombing raid on the night of 16 January 1945, destroyed much of the city. The death toll is estimated at 2,000–2,500. Near the end of World War II, the city of about 340,000 became capital of the Province of Magdeburg. Brabag's Magdeburg/Rothensee plant that produced synthetic oil from lignite coal was a target of the Oil Campaign of World War II. The impressive Gründerzeit suburbs north of the city, called the Nordfront, were destroyed as well as the city's main street with its Baroque buildings. It was occupied by 9th US Army troops on 18 April 1945 and was left to the Red Army on 1 July 1945. Post-war the area was part of the Soviet Zone of Occupation and many of the remaining pre-World War II city buildings were destroyed, with only a few buildings near the cathedral and in the southern part of the old city being restored to their pre-war state. Before the reunification of Germany, many surviving Gründerzeit buildings were left uninhabited and, after years of degradation, waiting for demolition. From 1949 until German reunification on 3 October 1990, Magdeburg belonged to the German Democratic Republic.

Magdeburg Stadtplan 1900

Map of Magdeburg, 1900

Siegelmarke Kreis Versicherungskommissar - Magdeburger Land - Feuer - Societaet W0251229

Sealing stamp (1850–1923)

Bundesarchiv Bild 183-14898-0002, Magdeburg, Blick auf die zerstörte Altstadt

Magdeburg after World War II

Magdeburg, Royal Air Force Bomber Command, 1942-1945 CL3459

Destroyed Magdeburg

Since German reunification

In 1990 Magdeburg became the capital of the new state of Saxony-Anhalt within reunified Germany. Huge parts of the city and its centre were also rebuilt in a modern style. Its economy is one of the fastest-growing in the former East German states.[8]

In 2005 Magdeburg celebrated its 1200th anniversary.

The city was hit by 2013 European floods. Authorities declared a state of emergency and said they expected the Elbe river to rise higher than in 2002. In Magdeburg, with water levels of five metres (16 ft) above normal, about 23,000 residents had to leave their homes on 9 June.[9]

Landtag-sachsen-anhalt-2012

Magdeburg is the capital and seat of the Landtag of Saxony-Anhalt

Magdeburg-Hundertwasserhaus Grüne Zitadelle

The Green Citadel of Magdeburg, built in 2005

Hochwasser 2013 Magdeburg 2013-06-05

Magdeburg during the 2013 Elbe flood

MagdeburgStalinist

Magdeburg's centre has a number of Stalinist buildings from the 1950s.

Geography

Climate

Magdeburg has a Humid continental climate (Dfb) bordering on an oceanic climate (Cfb) according to Köppen climate classification.

Main sights

02 Magdeburg 004
Cathedral of Magdeburg
Magdeburg St Petri 02
The three churches at night
.00 1547 Magdeburg - Grüne Zitadelle
Grüne Zitadelle

Cathedral

One of Magdeburg's most impressive buildings is the Lutheran Cathedral of Saints Catherine and Maurice with a height of 104 m (341.21 ft), making it the tallest church building of eastern Germany. It is notable for its beautiful and unique sculptures, especially the "Twelve Virgins" at the Northern Gate, the depictions of Otto I the Great and his wife Editha as well as the statues of St Maurice and St Catherine. The predecessor of the cathedral was a church built in 937 within an abbey, called St. Maurice. Emperor Otto I the Great was buried here beside his wife in 973. St. Maurice burnt to ashes in 1207. The exact location of that church remained unknown for a long time. The foundations were rediscovered in May 2003, revealing a building 80 m (262.47 ft) long and 41 m (134.51 ft) wide.

The construction of the new church lasted 300 years. The cathedral of Saints Catherine and Maurice was the first Gothic church building in Germany. The building of the steeples was completed as late as 1520.

While the cathedral was virtually the only building to survive the massacres of the Thirty Years' War, it suffered damage in World War II. It was soon rebuilt and completed in 1955.

The square in front of the cathedral (also called the Neuer Markt, or "new marketplace") was occupied by an imperial palace (Kaiserpfalz), which was destroyed in the fire of 1207. The stones from the ruin were used for the building of the cathedral. The presumed remains of the palace were excavated in the 1960s.

Other sights

  • Unser Lieben Frauen Monastery (Our Lady), 11th century, containing the church of St. Mary. Today a museum for Modern Art. Home of the National Collection of Small Art Statues of the GDR (Nationale Sammlung Kleinkunstplastiken der DDR).
  • The Magdeburger Reiter ("Magdeburg Rider", 1240), the first free-standing equestrian sculpture north of the Alps. It probably depicts the Emperor Otto I.
  • Town hall (1698). This building had stood on the market place since the 13th century, but it was destroyed in the Thirty Years' War; the new town hall was built in a Renaissance style influenced by Dutch architecture. It was renovated and re-opened in Oct 2005.
  • Landtag; the seat of the government of Saxony-Anhalt with its Baroque façade built in 1724.
  • monuments depicting Otto von Guericke (1907), Eike von Repkow and Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben.
  • Ruins of the greatest fortress of the former Kingdom of Prussia.
  • Rotehorn-Park.
  • Elbauenpark containing the highest wooden structure in Germany.
  • St. Sebastian's Cathedral, seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Magdeburg.
  • St. John Church (Johanniskirche)
  • The Gruson-Gewächshäuser, a botanical garden within a greenhouse complex
  • The Magdeburg Water Bridge, Europe's longest water bridge
  • "Die Grüne Zitadelle" or The Green Citadel of Magdeburg, a large, pink building of a modern architectural style designed by Friedensreich Hundertwasser and completed in 2005.
  • Jerusalem Bridge.

Magdeburg is one of the major towns along the Elbe Cycle Route (Elberadweg).

View of Magdeburg, from the tower of the Johanniskirche
View of Magdeburg, from the tower of the Johanniskirche

Culture and sports

Weihnachtsmarkt MD
Magdeburg Christmas market


Magdeburg has a municipal theatre, Theater Magdeburg.

The city is portrayed as a rebel castle on the strategy map of Medieval II: Total War.

The discus was re-discovered in Magdeburg in the 1870s by Christian Georg Kohlrausch, a gymnastics teacher.

Magdeburg is well known for its Christmas market, which is an attraction for 1.5 million visitors every year. Other events are the Stadtfest, Christopher Street Day, Elbe in Flames, and the Europafest Magdeburg. The autumn fair (formerly men's fair) of Magdeburg goes back to Germany's oldest folk festival. The tradition dates back to September 1010, when the holy feast of the Theban Legion was celebrated in Magdeburg (then called Magathaburg).[10]

Event venues

Elbauenpark seebuehne
Lake-Stage at Elbauenpark
  • GETEC Arena – Biggest multi-purpose hall in Saxony-Anhalt, home of handball team SC Magdeburg
  • AMO - Culture and congress building
  • Altes Theater am Jerichower Platz – Former theater, used for parties and large conferences
  • Stadthalle - Concert hall
  • St. Johannis Church
  • St. Petri Church, with stained glass by Charles Crodel
  • Seebühne at Elbauenpark
  • Paulus Church
  • Concert hall Georg Philipp Telemann at "Kloster unser lieben Frauen"
  • Projekt 7 – Night club at the university campus. Concerts with indie-pop and rock music
  • Factory – Former factory building, German and international pop, rock, metal, and indie music artists are featured
  • Kulturwerk Fichte – used mainly for conferences
  • Prinzzclub – Night club at Halberstädter Straße – house-, electro and black music
  • Festung Mark – Part of the former city fortification, now reconstructed for parties and conventions
  • Kunstkantine – Factory cafeteria, monthly electro-music parties
  • Feuerwache – Former fire station, repurposed for events
  • MDCC-Arena - Home of 1. FC Magdeburg

Sports

Magdeburg has a proud history of sports teams, with football proving the most popular. 1. FC Magdeburg currently play in the 2. Liga. The now defunct clubs SV Victoria 96 Magdeburg and Cricket Viktoria Magdeburg were among the first football clubs in Germany. 1. FC Magdeburg is the only East German football club to have won a European club football competition. There is also the very successful handball team, SC Magdeburg who are the first German team to win the EHF Champions League.

Education

The Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg (German: Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg) was founded in 1993 and is one of the youngest universities in Germany. The university in Magdeburg has about 13,000 students in nine faculties. There are 11,700 papers published in international journals from this institute.

The Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Sciences was founded in 1991. There are 30 direct study programs in five departments in Magdeburg and two departments in Stendal. The university has more than 130 professors and approximately 4,500 students at Magdeburg and 1,900 at Stendal.

Blick auf die Otto-von-Guericke Universität Magdeburg

Aerial view of the University area

Campustower magdeburg 11

Campustower of the Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg

UB MD innen

Magdeburg library

Hs-magdeburg

Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Science

Twin towns and sister cities

Magdeburg is twinned with:[11]

Gallery

Blick über Magdeburg

View over Magdeburg in 2012

Kloster Unser Lieben Frauen Magdeburg2007

Kloster Unser Lieben Frauen

Kirchentrio Magdeburg

The three churches on the banks of the Elbe river

Magdeburg Hundertwasserhaus

The Grüne Zitadelle (Green Citadel)

Justizzentrum Magdeburg

Justizzentrum

Elbauenpark

View over Elbauenpark with Jahrtausendturm

Elbufer Magdeburg mit Dom

Elbe river in Magdeburg

Magdeburg Alter Markt mit Rathaus

City Hall with Sankt-Johannis-Church

Magdeburg Nordbrueckenzug

Jerusalem Bridges

Saxonia bei Dämmerung in Magdeburg

The Elbe in Magdeburg

Magdeburg Hasselbachplatz 2006-11-18

The Hasselbachplatz, an important transport hub

Magdeburger Reiter Gruppe im Museum

The Magdeburger Reiter

Allee-Center Magdeburg Innen

Allee shopping centre is one of seven shopping centres

People

A–K

Otto-von-Guericke-TS
Otto von Guericke

L–Z

Bundesarchiv B 145 Bild-F002352-0002, Bonn, Bundestag, Pariser Verträge, Ollenhauer
Erich Ollenhauer Bundestag 1954
Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben
Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben 1782

See also

References

  1. ^ "Bevölkerung der Gemeinden – Stand: 31. Dezember 2017" (PDF). Statistisches Landesamt Sachsen-Anhalt (in German).
  2. ^ www.statistik.sachsen-anhalt.de
  3. ^ https://www.hs-magdeburg.de/home.html
  4. ^ 2013 European floods
  5. ^ "Magdeburg: Jungfrau oder Groß? Der Ortsname erklärt" (in German). Onomastik.com. Retrieved 24 July 2010.
  6. ^ a b c d  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Magdeburg". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.
  7. ^ "Religijski rat - "Ubili smo Boga u Magdeburgu!"" (in Serbo-Croatian). Večernji list. 28 January 2016. Retrieved 30 January 2016.
  8. ^ http://www.stadtentwicklung-sachsen-anhalt.de/inhalt/situation/
  9. ^ Thousands evacuated as Elbe bursts dam in German floods 10 June 2013
  10. ^ Ottopix (2 October 2018). "The oldest folk festival in Germany". Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i Zachert, Uwe; Annica Kunz. "Twin cities". Landeshauptstadt Magdeburg [City of Magdeburg]. Archived from the original on 1 September 2012. Retrieved 7 August 2013.
  12. ^ "Braunschweigs Partner und Freundschaftsstädte" [Braunschweig - Partner and Friendship Cities]. Stadt Braunschweig [City of Braunschweig] (in German). Archived from the original on 1 December 2012. Retrieved 7 August 2013.
  13. ^ "Sister Cities of Nashville". SCNashville.org. Retrieved 3 August 2011.
  14. ^ Міста-побратими м. Запоріжжя [Twin Cities Zaporozhye]. City of Zaporizhia (in Ukrainian). Шановні відвідувачі і користувачі сайту. Archived from the original on 3 August 2012. Retrieved 7 August 2013.
  15. ^ "Radom - Miasta partnerskie" [Radom - Partnership cities]. Miasto Radom [City of Radom] (in Polish). Archived from the original on 3 April 2013. Retrieved 7 August 2013.
  16. ^ "Radom - miasta partnerskie" (in Polish). radom.naszestrony.pl. Archived from the original on 26 July 2007. Retrieved 7 August 2013.
  17. ^ "Harbin Magdeburg twinning". City of Magdeburg. Retrieved 8 August 2013.
  18. ^ Florence, Jeanne. "Le Havre - Les villes jumelées" [Le Havre - Twin towns] (in French). Retrieved 7 August 2013.
  19. ^ "Le Havre - Les villes jumelées" [Le Havre - Twin towns] (in French). City of Le Havre. Archived from the original on 29 July 2013. Retrieved 7 August 2013.
  20. ^ Pace, Eric. "Alfons Bach, 95, Designer of Tubular Furniture". Arts. The New York Times. Retrieved 1 October 2012.

External links

1. FC Magdeburg

1. FC Magdeburg is a German association football club based in the city of Magdeburg. The club was founded in 1965 and spent all but one season in East Germany top flight, the DDR-Oberliga, winning three championships and seven cup titles. It is the only East German club to have won a European title, winning the European Cup Winners' Cup in 1974. After German reunification, the club fell on hard times and only entered professional football in 2015 when the side was promoted to the 3. Liga.

1973–74 European Cup Winners' Cup

The 1973–74 European Cup Winners' Cup football club tournament was won by Magdeburg in a final victory against defending champions Milan. It was the first–and only–win for an East German side in a European tournament.

1974 European Cup Winners' Cup Final

The 1974 European Cup Winners' Cup Final was a football match of the 1973–74 European Cup Winners' Cup and the 14th UEFA Cup Winners' Cup final of the competition. It was contested between 1. FC Magdeburg of East Germany and the defending champions, Milan of Italy, and was held at Feijenoord Stadion in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Magdeburg won the match 2–0 thanks to goals by Enrico Lanzi (own goal) and Wolfgang Seguin. It was the only time one of the major European trophies was won by an East German club.

2018–19 2. Bundesliga

The 2018–19 2. Bundesliga was the 45th season of the 2. Bundesliga. It began on 3 August 2018 and concluded on 19 May 2019.1. FC Köln and SC Paderborn were promoted to the Bundesliga while 1. FC Magdeburg and MSV Duisburg were relegated to the 3. Liga.

Archbishopric of Magdeburg

The Archbishopric of Magdeburg was a Roman Catholic archdiocese (969–1552) and Prince-Archbishopric (1180–1680) of the Holy Roman Empire centered on the city of Magdeburg on the Elbe River.

Planned since 955 and established in 968, the Roman Catholic archdiocese had de facto turned void since 1557, when the last papally confirmed prince-archbishop, the Lutheran Sigismund of Brandenburg came of age and ascended to the see and the Magdeburg cathedral chapter had adopted Lutheranism in 1567, with most parishioners having preceded in their conversion. All his successors were only administrators of the prince-archbishopric and Lutheran too, except of the Catholic layman Leopold William of Austria (1631–1635). In ecclesiastical respect the remaining Catholics and their parishes and abbeys in the former archdiocese were put under supervision of the Archdiocese of Cologne in 1648 and under the jurisdiction of the Apostolic Vicariate of the Northern Missions in 1670.

In political respect the Erzstift, the archiepiscopal and capitular temporalities, had gained imperial immediacy as prince-archbishopric in 1180. Its territory comprised only some parts of the archdiocesan area, such as the city of Magdeburg, the bulk of the Magdeburg Börde, and the Jerichow Land as an integral whole and exclaves comprising about the Saalkreis including Halle upon Saale, Oebisfelde and environs as well as Jüterbog and environs. The prince-archbishopric maintained its statehood as an elective monarchy until 1680. Then Brandenburg-Prussia acquired Magdeburg prince-archbishopric, and after being secularised, transformed it into the Duchy of Magdeburg, a hereditary monarchy in personal union with Brandenburg.

The 1994-founded modern Diocese of Magdeburg is a diocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic church located in the German states of Saxony-Anhalt (bulk), Brandenburg and Saxony (smaller fringes each).

German town law

The German town law (German: Deutsches Stadtrecht) or German municipal concerns (Deutsches Städtewesen) was a set of early town privileges based on the Magdeburg rights developed by Otto I. The Magdeburg Law became the inspiration for regional town charters not only in Germany, but also in Central and Eastern Europe who modified it during the Middle Ages. The German town law (based on Magdeburg rights) was used in the founding of many German cities, towns, and villages beginning in the 13th century.

Magdeburg Cathedral

Magdeburg Cathedral (German: Magdeburger Dom), officially called the Cathedral of Saints Catherine and Maurice (German: Dom zu Magdeburg St. Mauritius und Katharina), is a Protestant cathedral in Germany and the oldest Gothic cathedral in the country. It is the proto-cathedral of the former Prince-Archbishopric of Magdeburg. Today it is the principal church of the Evangelical Church in Central Germany. One of its steeples is 99.25 m (325 ft 7 in) tall, and the other is 100.98 m (331 ft 4 in), making it one of the tallest cathedrals in eastern Germany. The cathedral is likewise the landmark of Magdeburg, the capital city of the Bundesland of Saxony-Anhalt, and is also home to the grave of Emperor Otto I the Great.

The first church built in 937 at the location of the current cathedral was an abbey called St. Maurice, dedicated to Saint Maurice. The current cathedral was constructed over the period of 300 years starting from 1209, and the completion of the steeples took place only in 1520. Despite being repeatedly looted, Magdeburg Cathedral is rich in art, ranging from antiques to modern art.

Magdeburg Hauptbahnhof

Magdeburg Hauptbahnhof (German for Magdeburg main station, sometimes translated as Magdeburg Central Station) is the main railway station in the city of Magdeburg in the northern part of the German state of Saxony-Anhalt.

Magdeburg rights

Magdeburg rights (German: Magdeburger Recht; also called Magdeburg Law) were a set of town privileges first developed by Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor (936–973) and based on the Flemish law, which regulated the degree of internal autonomy within cities and villages, granted by the local ruler. Named after the German city of Magdeburg, these town charters were perhaps the most important set of medieval laws in Central Europe thus far. They became the basis for the German town laws developed during many centuries in the Holy Roman Empire. Even more importantly, adopted and modified by numerous monarchs including the rulers of Bohemia, Hungary, and Poland, the laws were a milestone in urbanization of the entire region and prompted the development of thousands of villages and cities.

Mechthild of Magdeburg

Mechthild (or Mechtild, Matilda, Matelda) of Magdeburg (c. 1207 – c. 1282/1294), a Beguine, was a Christian medieval mystic, whose book Das fließende Licht der Gottheit (The Flowing Light of Divinity) described her visions of God. She was the first mystic to write in German, as she did not know how to write in Latin.

Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg

The Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg (German: Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg, short OvGU) was founded in 1993 and is one of the youngest universities in Germany. The university in Magdeburg has about 14,000 students in nine faculties. There are 11,700 papers published in international journals from this institute.It is named after the physicist (and mayor of Magdeburg) Otto von Guericke, famous for his experiments with the Magdeburg hemispheres.

The former Technical University Magdeburg (Technische Hochschule Magdeburg), a teacher training college and a medical school were absorbed into the university when it was created. The university now composes nine faculties.

Province of Saxony

The Province of Saxony (German: Provinz Sachsen), also known as Prussian Saxony (Preußische Sachsen) was a province of the Kingdom of Prussia and later the Free State of Prussia from 1816 until 1945. Its capital was Magdeburg.

It was formed by the merger of various territories ceded or returned to Prussia in 1815 by the Congress of Vienna: most of the former northern territories of the Kingdom of Saxony (the remainder of which became part of Brandenburg or Silesia), the former French Principality of Erfurt, the Duchy of Magdeburg, the Altmark, the Principality of Halberstadt, and some other districts.

The province was bounded by the Electorate of Hesse (the province of Hesse-Nassau after 1866), the Kingdom of Hanover (the province of Hanover after 1866) and the Duchy of Brunswick to the west, Hanover (again) to the north, Brandenburg to the north and west, Silesia to the south-east, and the rump kingdom of Saxony and the small Ernestine duchies to the south. Its shape was very irregular and it entirely surrounded enclaves of Brunswick and some of the Ernestine duchies. It also possessed several exclaves, and was almost entirely bisected by the Duchy of Anhalt save for a small corridor of land around Aschersleben (which itself bisected Anhalt). The river Havel ran along the north-eastern border with Brandenburg north of Plaue but did not follow the border exactly.

The majority of the population was Protestant, with a Catholic minority (about 8% as of 1905) considered part of the diocese of Paderborn. The province sent 20 members to the Reichstag and 38 delegates to the Prussian House of Representatives (Abgeordnetenhaus).

SC Magdeburg

SC Magdeburg is a German multi-sports club located in the city of Magdeburg, which offers athletics, canoeing, gymnastics, rowing, swimming and handball. Historically, the club has also had a water polo section as well as a football section that was separated as 1. FC Magdeburg in 1965. The club is most famous for its handball team which has won the Champions League and preceding competitions three times, as well as the Cup Winners' Cup twice and EHF Cup twice. The club also won the East German handball championship ten times from 1970 to 1991. The handball side is the only team to have won the all titles in East Germany and the unified country after 1990.

Sack of Magdeburg

The Sack of Magdeburg, also called Magdeburg Wedding (German: Magdeburger Hochzeit) or Magdeburg's Sacrifice (German: Magdeburgs Opfergang), was the destruction of the Protestant city of Magdeburg on 20 May 1631 by the Imperial Army and the forces of the Catholic League, resulting in the deaths of around 20,000, including both defenders and non-combatants. The event is considered the worst massacre of the Thirty Years' War. Magdeburg, then one of the largest cities in Germany, having well over 25,000 inhabitants in 1630, did not recover its importance until well in the 18th century.

Saxony-Anhalt

Saxony-Anhalt (German: Sachsen-Anhalt, pronounced [ˌzaksn̩ ˈʔanhalt], official: Land Sachsen-Anhalt) is a state of Germany.

Saxony-Anhalt covers an area of 20,447.7 square kilometres (7,894.9 sq mi)

and has a population of 2.23 million, 108.69 inhabitants per km2, making it the 8th-largest state in Germany by area and the 10th-largest by population. Its capital is Magdeburg and its largest city is Halle (Saale). Saxony-Anhalt is surrounded by the states of Lower Saxony, Brandenburg, Saxony and Thuringia.

The state of Saxony-Anhalt originated in July 1945 after World War II, when the Soviet army administration in Allied-occupied Germany formed it from the former Prussian Province of Saxony and the Free State of Anhalt. Saxony-Anhalt became part of the German Democratic Republic in 1947, but was dissolved in 1952 during administrative reforms and its territory divided into the districts of Halle and Magdeburg, with the city of Torgau joining the district of Leipzig. Saxony-Anhalt was re-established in 1990 following German reunification, excluding Torgau, and became one of the Federal Republic of Germany's new states.

Schuberth

Schuberth GmbH is a German producer of safety helmets, producing combat helmets for Bundeswehr, protective headgear for Formula One, motorcycles and industrial workers. The company was founded in 1922 in Braunschweig, in Lower Saxony, and has been producing safety helmets for 90 years. Schuberth is currently based in Magdeburg and employs about 300 employees, producing 1.5 million helmets each year.Schuberth produces motorcycle helmets designed specifically for aerodynamic performance, and produces the helmets BMW Motorrad supplies under their own name. Schuberth first entered Formula One in 2000 using the QF1 helmet worn by Nick Heidfeld, after designing a safer helmet in response to Michael Schumacher's accident at the 1999 British Grand Prix. The helmet, which was lighter than others at the time and featured filters to remove fumes and dust from the air, was taken by more drivers including then World Champion Michael Schumacher, and was gradually developed into the current RF1 model. Currently, Schuberth helmets are used by Fernando Alonso, Nico Hülkenberg, Felipe Massa, Nico Rosberg and Susie Wolff. Schuberth designs all current helmets in their own wind tunnel facilities, to enable maximum aerodynamic efficiency, and employed Michael Schumacher as a consultant for motorcycle helmet design. NASCAR drivers Danica Patrick and Jimmie Johnson also use Schuberth helmets, theirs being variations on the designs used for F1 drivers.Schuberth produces helmets for a variety of industrial purposes, including ballistic protection for soldiers, protection for firefighters and construction workers, producing full face helmets and head protection. The company also produces personal protective equipment, such as facial protection, ear defenders and cold weather equipment.

Siege of Magdeburg (1806)

The siege of Magdeburg (French: Siège de Magdebourg) was a siege of the city that took place from 25 October to 8 November 1806 during the war of the Fourth Coalition. A French force, initially under the command of Marshal Grand Duke of Berg Joachim Murat, then a French army Corps under the command of Marshal Michel Ney laid siege and eventually obtained the surrender of Franz Kasimir von Kleist's Prussian force that had taken refuge in Magdeburg, Prussia's second city.After the twin battles of Jena and Auerstaedt, the victorious Grande Armée pursued the remains of the Prussian army, a part of which was under the command of Prince Hohenlohe, who directed it towards the fortified city of Magdeburg. Commanding the French force, Marshal Murat requested Hohenlohe's surrender, which the Prince refused, managing to escape the besieged fortress. Command was delegated to General of Infantry Kleist, who still had a numerous garrison of 25,000 men. While the French force initially outnumbered the defenders, Emperor Napoleon I recalled the Army Corps of Marshal Jean-de-Dieu Soult, leaving Marshal Ney and his 18,000 men Corps to besiege the city. Occupying both banks of the Elbe, Ney did not display sufficient vigor during the siege, with military action reduced to a mere series of skirmishes and a timid sortie attempt by Kleist, on 4 November. Despite Kleist's initial attempt to bolster the fading morale of his troops by declaring that he would surrender Magdeburg to the enemy only when his handkerchief would ignite in his pocket, faced with the prospect of a full-scale bombardment, the Prussians decided to open negotiations and an armistice was concluded on November 7, with the garrison capitulating the next day and evacuating the fortress on 11 November as prisoners of war.

United Nations Environment Programme

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), an agency of the United Nations, coordinates the organization's environmental activities and assists developing countries in implementing environmentally sound policies and practices. It was founded by Maurice Strong, its first director, as a result of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment (Stockholm Conference) in June 1972 and has overall responsibility for environmental problems among United Nations agencies; however, international talks on specialized issues, such as addressing climate change or combating desertification, are overseen by other UN organizations, like the Bonn-based Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification. UNEP's activities cover a wide range of issues regarding the atmosphere, marine and terrestrial ecosystems, environmental governance and green economy. It has played a significant role in developing international environmental conventions, promoting environmental science and information and illustrating the way those can be implemented in conjunction with policy, working on the development and implementation of policy with national governments, regional institutions in conjunction with environmental non-governmental organizations (NGOs). UNEP has also been active in funding and implementing environment related development projects.

UNEP frequently uses the alternative name UN Environment.UN Environment has aided in the formulation of guidelines and treaties on issues such as the international trade in potentially harmful chemicals, transboundary air pollution, and contamination of international waterways. Relevant documents, including scientific papers, are available via the UNEP Document Repository.The World Meteorological Organization and UN Environment established the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 1988. UN Environment is also one of several Implementing Agencies for the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol, and it is also a member of the United Nations Development Group. The International Cyanide Management Code, a programme of best practice for the chemical's use at gold mining operations, was developed under UN Environment's aegis.

Urstromtal

An urstromtal (plural: Urstromtäler) is a type of broad glacial valley, for example, in northern Central Europe, that appeared during the ice ages, or individual glacial periods of an ice age, at the edge of the Scandinavian ice sheet and was formed by meltwaters that flowed more or less parallel to the ice margin. Urstromtäler are an element of the glacial series. The term is German and means "ancient stream valley". Although often translated as "glacial valley", it should not be confused with a valley carved out by a glacier. More accurately some sources call them "meltwater valleys" or "ice-marginal valleys".

Climate data for Magdeburg
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 2.4
(36.3)
3.8
(38.8)
8.2
(46.8)
13.3
(55.9)
18.8
(65.8)
21.9
(71.4)
23.3
(73.9)
23.3
(73.9)
19.5
(67.1)
14.1
(57.4)
7.5
(45.5)
3.6
(38.5)
13.3
(55.9)
Daily mean °C (°F) −0.4
(31.3)
0.5
(32.9)
3.9
(39.0)
8.0
(46.4)
13.0
(55.4)
16.2
(61.2)
17.5
(63.5)
17.3
(63.1)
13.8
(56.8)
9.5
(49.1)
4.5
(40.1)
1.2
(34.2)
8.8
(47.8)
Average low °C (°F) −3
(27)
−2.5
(27.5)
0.4
(32.7)
3.4
(38.1)
7.7
(45.9)
10.9
(51.6)
12.3
(54.1)
12.1
(53.8)
9.4
(48.9)
5.7
(42.3)
1.9
(35.4)
−1.3
(29.7)
4.8
(40.6)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 33.3
(1.31)
31.1
(1.22)
37.9
(1.49)
40.2
(1.58)
46.6
(1.83)
61.5
(2.42)
48.1
(1.89)
51.4
(2.02)
36.1
(1.42)
29.1
(1.15)
38.2
(1.50)
40.6
(1.60)
494.1
(19.43)
Mean monthly sunshine hours 46.7 69.5 117.4 159.1 216.1 218.7 218.5 207.2 151.1 107.5 56.1 40.8 1,608.7
Source #1: DWD.DE
Source #2: http://www.ecad.eu/download/millennium/millennium.php
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