Madison Bumgarner

Madison Kyle Bumgarner (born August 1, 1989), commonly known by his nickname, "MadBum",[1][2] is an American professional baseball pitcher for the San Francisco Giants of Major League Baseball (MLB). Bumgarner has won three World Series championships (2010, 2012, 2014) and two Silver Slugger Awards (2014, 2015). He has also been selected to four National League All-Star teams and has the second-most strikeouts in franchise history by a Giants left-handed pitcher.[3]

Bumgarner played high school baseball at South Caldwell High School in Hudson, North Carolina, where he helped his team win the 2007 4A State Championship. After graduating, he was selected with the tenth overall pick in the 2007 MLB Draft by the San Francisco Giants. In 2008, his first year playing professionally, he won the South Atlantic League pitching triple crown. He and Buster Posey both made their Major League debuts in 2009, and have since established a reputation as one of the best batteries in recent MLB history, largely due to their prolific success early in their careers. Bumgarner pitched eight scoreless innings in Game 4 of the 2010 World Series, making him the youngest left-handed pitcher to start a World Series game, and helping win the franchise's first World Series in San Francisco and the first since 1954. Two years later, Bumgarner pitched seven more scoreless innings in Game 2 of the 2012 World Series. Bumgarner became the ace of a Giants pitching staff that won three World Series championships in a five-year span.

Following one of the most dominant postseason and World Series pitching performances in modern MLB history, he was named the Most Valuable Player of the 2014 World Series, the 2014 Babe Ruth Award winner, the 2014 Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year, and the 2014 Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year.

Madison Bumgarner
Madison Bumgarner on September 3, 2013
Bumgarner pitching at Petco Park in 2013
San Francisco Giants – No. 40
Starting pitcher
Born: August 1, 1989 (age 29)
Hickory, North Carolina, U.S.
Bats: Right Throws: Left
MLB debut
September 8, 2009, for the San Francisco Giants
MLB statistics
(through April 14, 2019)
Win–loss record111–85
Earned run average3.03
Strikeouts1,614
Teams
Career highlights and awards

MLB records

  • 0.25 career World Series ERA
  • 52 23 innings pitched, single postseason (2014)
  • 2 career grand slams by a pitcher (tied with Tony Cloninger)

Early life

Bumgarner was born August 1, 1989, in Hickory, North Carolina, and grew up in an area ten miles away nicknamed "Bumtown" because of the abundance of people with the surname Bumgarner who have lived there over the years after their ancestors had arrived from Germany.[4][5]

He grew up in a log house that his father built, sleeping in a loft at nights. Bumgarner's first word was "ball", and by the age of four, he was already playing in a youth baseball league, for which his father had to sign a waiver because the league was for five- to eight-year-olds. His parents, Kevin and Debbie, divorced while Bumgarner was in high school.[4]

Much like fellow Major League pitcher Brett Cecil, throwing a ball is the only thing Bumgarner does left-handed.[6]

High school

Bumgarner attended South Caldwell High School in Hudson, North Carolina, where he was known as "Maddie" and played on both the school's baseball team and the Post 29's American Legion Baseball team.[7] In his junior season, he had a 12–2 record, an 0.99 earned run average (ERA), and 120 strikeouts in 84 innings pitched as he led his team to a runner-up in the 2006 4A State Championship. Next season, he went 11–2 with a 1.05 ERA and 143 strikeouts in 86 innings while this time helping his team win the state championship.[8] He hit .424 with 11 home runs and 38 runs batted in.[7] He was named MVP of the playoffs and the Gatorade North Carolina Player of the Year, garnering the nickname "The Carolina Peach." Bumgarner attracted so much attention from scouts and agents in high school that his father built a wall around the bullpen at his high school field to keep them from distracting him as he warmed up.[4] He committed to attend the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a college baseball scholarship.[8]

In 2013, the North Carolina High School Athletic Association included him on its "100 To Remember" male athletes list, which included Michael Jordan, Carl Eller, and Jim Beatty.[9]

Professional career

Draft and minor leagues

The San Francisco Giants selected Bumgarner tenth overall in the first round of the 2007 MLB draft. Going into the draft, Baseball America had ranked him as the 14th best prospect overall. He was the first high school pitcher to be selected as the Giants' first pick since Matt Cain in 2002, and the first left-handed pitcher selected in the first round by the organization since Noah Lowry in 2001.[8]

Bumgarner pitched for the Augusta Greenjackets, the Giants' Low-A South Atlantic League affiliate, in 2008. The Giants had him alter the angle of his head during delivery, but after Bumgarner struggled over his first three starts in Augusta, he reverted to the way he had thrown in high school. With Augusta, he worked on his changeup, slider, and ability to throw effectively on the inside part of the plate, a critical trait for a pitcher with his side-armed delivery. When asked if it was tough to work on off-speed pitches in a league in which most of the hitters can be fooled with a fastball, Bumgarner replied, "The minors are all about player development. I needed to work on other pitches and have the confidence to throw them."[10] He won the South Atlantic League pitchers' Triple Crown, tying for the league lead in wins (15, tied with Levi Maxwell), leading the league in earned run average (1.46), and leading the league in strikeouts (164).[11] He began the 2009 season with the Giants' High-A affiliate, the San Jose Giants of the California League. After five starts, in which he went 3–1 with a 1.48 ERA and 23 strikeouts, he was called up to the Giants AA affiliate, the Connecticut Defenders of the Eastern League. On July 22, he hit a grand slam against Eric Niesen and picked up the victory in a 9–3 triumph over the Binghamton Mets.[12] In 20 games (19 starts) with them, he went 9–1 with a 1.93 ERA and 69 strikeouts.[13]

In 2008, Baseball America ranked him the third-best prospect in the Giants organization.[14] Before the start of the 2009 season, the magazine ranked Bumgarner as the ninth-best prospect in baseball.[15] Entering 2010, Bumgarner attended the Giants' spring training before the season, competing for the position of fifth starter. He dropped to the fourteenth-best prospect in baseball on the magazine's list, as some writers were concerned about a drop in Bumgarner's velocity. Jason Grey of ESPN wrote that the drop was "puzzling."[16][17] Out of shape entering the new season, he struggled and was sent down to the AAA Fresno Grizzlies, partly due to his loss of velocity.[16][18] In 14 starts with Fresno, he went 7–1 with a 3.16 ERA and 59 strikeouts.[13]

San Francisco Giants (2009–present)

2009

On September 8, 2009 at AT&T Park, Bumgarner was called up to the Majors for his first start, making his Major League debut against the San Diego Padres in place of ace Tim Lincecum, who was scratched with back spasms. At the age of twenty, he became the second-youngest pitcher ever to start a game for the Giants, and the youngest since the franchise moved west in 1958. He was older only than Mike McCormick, who started two games for the Giants—as a nineteen-year-old—in 1956, when the team was still in New York.[19][20] In the bottom of the third inning with no outs, Bumgarner struck out opposing pitcher Kevin Correia for his first career strikeout. Three days later, fellow star prospect Buster Posey made his Major League debut. Bumgarner made four appearances with the Giants in 2009, posting an ERA of 1.80, striking out ten batters, and pitching ten innings.[7]

2010

On June 26, 2010, Bumgarner was called up again to join the club, facing the Boston Red Sox the next day. He replaced Joe Martinez, who had made one start in place of an injured Todd Wellemeyer, in the rotation.[21]

On July 6, 2010 at Miller Park, in a 6-1 win over the Milwaukee Brewers, Bumgarner earned his first career victory by going eight innings without yielding a run.[22] Bumgarner pitched well enough that when Wellemeyer returned from the disabled list in August, Giants' manager Bruce Bochy chose to use him in the bullpen and leave Bumgarner in the rotation.[23]

In five September starts during the Giants' successful run to the National League West Division championship, Bumgarner posted an ERA of 1.13.[24] At the end of September, Bumgarner earned his first win at home, making him 7–6 on the season. After the season, he was named a starting pitcher on Baseball America's 2010 All-Rookie Team.[25]

On October 11 at Turner Field, in a 3-2 win over the Atlanta Braves in the National League Division Series clinching-Game 4, Bumgarner made his postseason debut and by pitching six innings advanced the Giants to the 2010 NLCS, becoming the youngest pitcher in Giants' franchise history to appear in, start, and win a playoff game.[24][26]

On October 20 at AT&T Park, in a 6-5 win over the Philadelphia Phillies in Game 4 of the National League Championship Series, Bumgarner became the third-youngest pitcher to start an LCS Game, according to Fox. Only Bret Saberhagen (20 years and 175 days) and Fernando Valenzuela (20 years, 347 days) were younger.

On October 23 at Citizens Bank Park, in a 3-2 win in the NLCS-clinching Game 6 over the Philadelphia Phillies, by pitching two shutout relief innings, Bumgarner helped advance the Giants to the 2010 World Series.[27]

On October 31 at Globe Life Park in Arlington, in a 4-0 win over the American League–champion Texas Rangers in Game 4 of the World Series—his World Series debut—Bumgarner pitched eight shutout innings, while allowing only three hits and one Ranger to reach second base, for his first career World Series win. Bumgarner became the fifth-youngest pitcher to start a World Series game, the fourth-youngest to win one, and the youngest to make a start of six scoreless innings or more or the second youngest starter behind Jim Palmer to throw eight scoreless innings in a World Series game.[28] Bumgarner and Posey were the first rookie battery to start a World Series game since Spec Shea and Yogi Berra in 1947. This win gave the Giants a 3–1 lead in the series, en route to the Giants winning the next day for their first World Series championship in fifty-six years—since the 1954 World Series—and their first title in the fifty-two-year history of the San Francisco Era.[29]

2011

Madison Bumgarner on June 21, 2011
Bumgarner pitching on June 21, 2011

After his start on May 13, 2011, Bumgarner was 0–5 with a 4.58 ERA in his first seven starts of the season. He struggled in his first two games of the season, but soon after regained his post-season form. However, he was the victim of poor run support and bad luck.[30] Despite pitching at least six innings and giving up more than one earned run only once in his five starts from April 27 through May 19, it wasn't until the 19th that he got his first win, collecting an ERA of 3.71 for the season at that point. By June 9, Bumgarner had a 1.93 ERA over his last nine starts, yet had two wins and five losses to show for it. In seven of his eight losses at that point, the Giants either only scored once or scored no times at all.[31] On September 5, Bumgarner struck out thirteen batters while yielding two earned runs, seven hits and one walk over 8.1 innings while earning the win against the San Diego Padres at Petco Park. It was his second consecutive double digit strikeout game, having struck out 11 batters in his previous start against the Chicago Cubs.[32] With his win September 16, Bumgarner had won five consecutive starts; he finished the season 13–13 with a 3.21 ERA, 204 innings pitched, and 191 strikeouts.[31] Worth noting, however, is that Bumgarner was 12–1 for the games in which his teammates scored three or more runs for him.[7] Bumgarner finished in eleventh place for the National League Cy Young Award voting by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

2012

On April 17, 2012, Bumgarner and the Giants agreed to a six-year contract extension worth $35.56 million through the 2017 season, with additional $12 million options for 2018 and 2019.[33]

Bumgarner began the 2012 season by going 5–1 with a 2.31 ERA.[34]

On May 5 at AT&T Park, in a 5-2 win over the Milwaukee Brewers, Bumgarner became the first Giant since Jason Schmidt to win fourteen games in a twenty-game span.[35]

On June 12 at AT&T Park, in a 6-3 win over the Houston Astros, Bumgarner hit his first career home run into left field off of Bud Norris. After May 14, the Giants went sixteen home games without hitting a home run until Bumgarner hit his first. Bumgarner also struck out twelve batters, becoming the most recent Giant to hit a home run and strikeout ten or more batters in the same game since Mike Krukow, who was announcing the game.[36]

On June 28 at AT&T Park, in a 5-0 win over the Cincinnati Reds, Bumgarner pitched both his first career regular season complete game and regular season complete game shutout. With this victory, it marked the first time in franchise history with four straight shutouts and established a new San Francisco record of thirty-six consecutive scoreless innings.[37]

On September 22 at AT&T Park, in an 8-4 win over the San Diego Padres, the Giants clinched the National League West Division title for the second time in three years.

In 2012, Bumgarner won sixteen games (with only seven losses) while posting a 3.37 ERA and striking out one hundred and ninety-one batters in ​208 13 innings.[7]

On October 25 at AT&T Park, in a 2-0 win over the American League–champion Detroit Tigers in Game 2 of the World Series, Bumgarner pitched seven scoreless innings, striking out eight batters and yielding only two hits. Bumgarner became the first pitcher to begin his World Series career with fifteen scoreless innings since Bruce Hurst did so in 1986.[38] Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson in 1905 was the last Giant before Bumgarner to have scoreless outings in his first two career World Series starts.[38] The Giants swept the Series, for their second title in three seasons.

2013

The 2013 season saw Bumgarner set career bests for ERA (2.77), walks plus hits per inning pitched (WHIP) (1.03) and strikeouts (199) in 31 starts, finishing with a 13–9 record. Bumgarner's WHIP was the lowest for a Giants' left-hander since Carl Hubbell's in 1933. Bumgarner was also selected by Giants manager Bruce Bochy and the manager of the National League team, to pitch in the All Star game for the first time. However, Bumgarner didn't pitch in the game.

On August 7, 2013 at AT&T Park, by pitching seven innings and allowing only three runs, it was Bumgarner's ninth straight start in which he pitched seven or more innings and allowed three runs or less. According to CSN Bay Area, this was the longest streak seen in the San Francisco Era since Gaylord Perry had ten in 1969.

He took pride in pitching over two-hundred innings for the third consecutive season (201.1) and improving at holding runners on base, conceding 8 stolen bases in 2013 compared with 27 in 2012.[39] Bumgarner was rested for what would have been his final start of the season, following a great seven-inning, one-run, 10-strikeout win over the New York Mets. Bochy said he wanted to give Bumgarner a break and also allow Barry Zito a final home start.[40] Bumgarner finished in ninth place for the National League Cy Young Award voting by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

2014

Following his outstanding 2013 season, on February 25, Bumgarner was named the Giants' Opening Day starter for the first time in his career.[41] On April 11, Bumgarner hit his first career grand slam and registered a career-high five runs batted in against the Colorado Rockies' Jorge de la Rosa, the third home run of Bumgarner's major league career.[42] Bumgarner was named NL Pitcher of the Month for May after going 5–0 in six starts, with 48 strikeouts and a 2.08 ERA.[43]

On July 13, in an 8–4 win over the Arizona Diamondbacks at AT&T Park, Bumgarner and batterymate Buster Posey each hit grand slam home runs, marking the first ever occurrence in MLB history that batterymates each hit grand slams in the same game.[44] Bumgarner also tied the all-time MLB records for grand slams in a career and in a single season by a pitcher with two. Tony Cloninger had been the last pitcher to hit two grand slams in one season, doing so in one game on July 3, 1966.

On August 26 at AT&T Park, in a 3–0 win over the Colorado Rockies, Bumgarner pitched his second career complete game one-hit shutout, which included pitching seven perfect innings to start the game until Justin Morneau reached out on a 1–2 pitch that went down deep right field for a double. In the process, he set a franchise-record sixth career game with ten or more strikeouts and no walks. Bumgarner beat Jorge de la Rosa at AT&T Park for the second time that season. Bumgarner was named the NL Pitcher of the Month for August. He went 4–1 with a 1.57 ERA, threw three complete games, and had 56 strikeouts against just three walks.[45]

On September 12 at AT&T Park, in a 9–0 win over the Los Angeles Dodgers Bumgarner became the fifth left-handed pitcher in franchise history to strikeout over two hundred batters and struck out former teammate Juan Uribe for his 207th strikeout of the season, breaking Ray Sadecki's mark and setting a new San Francisco Giants single season strikeout record by a left-handed pitcher.[46]

Bumgarner set a career-high in wins with 18, posting an 18–10 record, a 2.98 ERA, and 219 strikeouts for the 2014 MLB regular season. Bumgarner finished in fourth place for the National League Cy Young Award voting by the Baseball Writers' Association of America, behind Clayton Kershaw, future rotation mate Johnny Cueto, and Adam Wainwright.

On October 1 at PNC Park, in an 8-0 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates in the National League Wild Card Game, Bumgarner pitched his first career postseason complete-game shutout and first of the 2014 postseason, a four-hit shutout, allowing the Giants to advance to the NLDS against the Washington Nationals. He joins Sandy Koufax from the 1965 World Series and Justin Verlander from the 2012 American League Division Series as the only postseason pitchers to pitch a shutout and strikeout ten or more batters in a winner-take-all game.

On October 11 at Busch Stadium, in a 3-0 win over the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 1 of the National League Championship Series, by tossing ​7 23 shutout innings, Bumgarner set a new Major League postseason record with ​26 23 consecutive postseason scoreless innings on the road, breaking the ninety-year-old record held by fellow Giant, Art Nehf. For his performance, he was named NLCS MVP.[47]

On October 21 at Kauffman Stadium, in a 7-1 win over the American League–champion Kansas City Royals in Game 1 of the World Series, Bumgarner pitched seven innings of one-run ball. His major league postseason record of ​32 23 consecutive scoreless innings on the road ended when he gave up a solo home run to Salvador Pérez in the seventh inning; it was the first run he had allowed on the road since Game 4 of the 2010 NLCS.

On October 26 at AT&T Park, in a 5-0 win over the Royals in Game 5 of the World Series, Bumgarner pitched his second career postseason complete-game shutout, another four-hit shutout on the 2014 postseason, becoming the second pitcher in franchise history with two shutouts in a single postseason after Christy Mathewson's three shutouts in the 1905 World Series and the first San Francisco Giants pitcher to toss a complete-game shutout in a World Series game since Jack Sanford in Game 2 of the 1962 World Series, according to Fox. In addition, according to Fox Sports, Bumgarner is the fourth left-handed pitcher with at least two shutouts in a single postseason, joining Whitey Ford, Sandy Koufax, and former teammate Randy Johnson. He set all-time MLB records for lowest World Series ERA (0.29) among pitchers of at least twenty-five innings pitched and three starts, and was the first pitcher in World Series history to pitch a shutout with at least eight strikeouts and no walks.[48]

On October 29, in Game 7 of the World Series, on two days rest, Bumgarner pitched five scoreless innings in relief, preserving a one run lead as the Giants won their third title in five seasons. This effort drew media comparisons to Barry Bonds, in terms of unusual statistical performance.[49] He was named the 2014 World Series MVP, finishing the Series with a 2–0 record, 1 save, and a 0.43 ERA.[50] In three pitching appearances, Bumgarner gave up one run in 21 innings. Some analysts have posited that Bumgarner's entire 2014 postseason record—in which the 25-year-old threw a record-breaking ​52 23 innings[51]—was the most dominant postseason pitching performance ever.[52] Following the postseason, he won the Babe Ruth Award as the postseason MVP and was named Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year and Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year.[53][54][55]

2015

In a 4–0 win over the Los Angeles Dodgers on May 21, Bumgarner paired up and beat Clayton Kershaw for the third time that season, becoming the first pitcher to hit a home run off of Kershaw.[56] The home run made Kershaw the second Cy Young Award winner to surrender a home run to Bumgarner after Zack Greinke. He became the first reigning World Series MVP to homer off the defending League MVP.[57]

On June 23 at AT&T Park against the San Diego Padres, Bumgarner struck out a career-high fourteen batters, tying Atlee Hammaker's franchise record for most strikeouts in a single game by a left-handed pitcher.[58] On June 28, in a 6–3 win over the Colorado Rockies at AT&T Park, Bumgarner had two hits, one a solo home run, scored twice, and struck out Brandon Barnes for his one-thousandth career strikeout. He is also the third left-handed pitcher in the San Francisco Era and the third youngest in franchise history to reach the milestone. Only Amos Rusie (21) and Christy Mathewson (25) were younger.[59]

On July 14 at the 2015 MLB All-Star Game held at Great American Ball Park against the American League, Bumgarner appeared in his first career Major League Baseball All-Star Game, pitching a scoreless fourth inning for the National League with batterymate Buster Posey.[60]

On August 11 at AT&T Park, Bumgarner pitched a complete game 3–1 victory over the Houston Astros where he struck out twelve and walked none. During the outing, he struck out a career-high seven straight batters to tie a San Francisco record with Juan Marichal and Jonathan Sánchez.[61] On August 16, he tied his career-high by striking out fourteen batters, including striking out that year's National League MVP Bryce Harper a career-high three times, hit a home run, and pitched a complete game shutout against the Washington Nationals. In addition, it was his tenth career home run as a pitcher.[62] He became the first Giants left-handed pitcher to record multiple fourteen-strikeout games in a single season and career, and joined Juan Marichal as the only Giants pitchers in the San Francisco Era to strike out ten or more batters, hit a home run, and record a shutout in the same game.[63] Bumgarner was honored for the first time in his career with National League Player of the Week honors.[64]

On August 18 at Busch Stadium, in a 2–0 win over the St. Louis Cardinals, Bumgarner logged his first career pinch-hit, a two-out single to left field in the top of the seventh inning off of Lance Lynn. He became the first Giants pitcher to record a hit in a pitch-hitting appearance since Kirk Rueter did so on August 17, 2004 against the Montreal Expos.[65]

On August 21 at PNC Park, in a 6–4 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates, Bumgarner hit his fifth homer and won his fifteenth game of the season, the first to do so since Carlos Zambrano in 2006, and the sixth pitcher since 1970 according to SportsCenter.[66][67][68]

On August 28 at AT&T Park, in a 9–1 win over the Chicago Cubs, Bumgarner struck out twelve batters through six innings, logging his third straight game with twelve or more strikeouts.[69] This marks the first occurrence a Giants pitcher has struck out twelve or more batters in at least three games in a single calendar month since John Montefusco in August 1975.[70]

On September 1 at Dodger Stadium, Bumgarner paired up against Zack Greinke, both of whom batted eighth in the starting lineup. It marked the first time in the same Giants-Dodgers game that both pitchers batted eighth.[71] He also became the first left-handed pitcher in the live-ball era to hit five home runs and strikeout two hundred batters in a single season.[72]

On September 12 at AT&T Park, in an 8–0 win over the San Diego Padres, Bumgarner pitched his third career complete game one-hit shutout, including a career-high 7​23 perfect innings to start the game.[73]

On September 24 at Petco Park, Bumgarner struck out his 220th batter of the season, breaking his own San Francisco Giants single season strikeout record by a left-handed pitcher.

Bumgarner tied a career-high in wins with eighteen, posting an 18–9 record, a 2.93 ERA, and also set career-highs with a .667 win percentage, 218.1 innings pitched and 234 strikeouts for the 2015 MLB regular season. According to CSN Bay Area, his 234 strikeouts are the most by a Giants left-handed pitcher since Rube Marquard struck out 237 batters in the 1911 season. He was named the winner of the 2015 National League Silver Slugger Award at pitcher.[74] Bumgarner finished in sixth place for the National League Cy Young Award voting by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

2016

On April 9, 2016 at AT&T Park, Bumgarner matched up with Clayton Kershaw less than a year after hitting his first home run off of Kershaw, and Bumgarner hit another one into the left-field seats in nearly exactly the same spot. Since the 2014 season, Bumgarner, Troy Tulowitzki, and Daniel Murphy are the only three players to have homered off of Kershaw multiple times. Over Kershaw's last twenty-seven starts, Kershaw has allowed two of his eleven home runs to Bumgarner.[75]

From April 20 to June 20, Bumgarner made twelve consecutive starts allowing two earned runs or fewer, which tied Fred Anderson for the third longest streak in Giants history since 1913.

On June 30, in a 12-6 win over the Oakland Athletics at Oakland Alameda Coliseum, Bumgarner was started at pitcher hitting for himself in an American League ballpark, the first time this was intentionally done in the Majors since 1976, according to SportsCenter, and only the fifth time since the creation of the designated hitter rule in 1973. He went 1 for 4, opening the third inning with a double and starting a six-run rally.[76]

On July 10 at AT&T Park, in a 4-0 win over the Arizona Diamondbacks, Bumgarner pitched his fourth career complete game one-hit shutout and third career game by striking out fourteen batters, tying his career-high and extending his record, including striking out a career-high nine batters via his curveball. Bumgarner's four career one-hitters are the most by a Giants pitcher in the last one hundred years, not bettered since Christy Mathewson's six career one-hitters. Bumgarner struck out eleven batters through five innings, also a career-high. He also carried a no-hitter through ​7 13 innings until it was broken up by Jake Lamb. Bumgarner tied Christy Mathewson for second all-time in franchise history in double-digit strikeout games.[77][78] According to SportsCenter, Bumgarner is the fourth pitcher in the last three seasons to carry at least three no-hit bids into the seventh inning or further. The others are Jake Arrieta with four, and Max Scherzer and Marco Estrada who have three apiece. According to Fox Sports at the All-Star break, Bumgarner's 1.94 ERA was the lowest by any Giants pitcher since 1983.

On July 31 at AT&T Park, in a 3-1 win over the Washington Nationals and in support of fellow rotation mate Matt Cain's one hundredth career win, Bumgarner pinch-hit for him after Cain threw five no-hit innings on ninety-three pitches. Bumgarner would hit an opposite-field leadoff double off the bricks, becoming the first Giants pitcher to record a pinch-hit double in a pitch-hitting appearance since Ray Sadecki did so in 1967, according to CSN Bay Area. The Giants inserted pinch-runner and another fellow rotation mate Jeff Samardzija, who would score later in the inning, marking the first occurrence in a San Francisco Giants game that a pinch-hitting pitcher reached base, was substituted for by a pinch-running pitcher, and scored a run.[79][80][81]

On August 18 at AT&T Park, in a 10-7 win over the New York Mets, Bumgarner became the second pitcher in the modern era after Hal Jeffcoat of the 1957 Cincinnati Redlegs to allow a grand slam and then hit a go-ahead home run in the same inning, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. Bumgarner surrendered a grand slam to future teammate Justin Ruggiano in the top of the fourth inning and proceeded to hit a two-run home run off of Jacob deGrom in the bottom of the fourth inning.

On August 23 at Dodger Stadium, Bumgarner struck out Los Angeles Dodgers batter Rob Segedin for his two hundredth strikeout of the season, becoming the first left-handed pitcher in Giants franchise history to accomplish the feat for three straight seasons, and tying Christy Mathewson for second all-time behind Amos Rusie, Juan Marichal, and Tim Lincecum's four.[82][83][84]

On September 3 at Wrigley Field, in a 3-2 win over the Chicago Cubs, Bumgarner won his second game of the season facing the eventual World Series Champion Chicago Cubs and out-dueled their defending Cy Young Award winner Jake Arrieta. Bumgarner struck out ten batters and walked nobody, notching his thirtieth career double-digit strikeout game, surpassing Christy Mathewson's twenty-nine for second place in Giants franchise history behind only former rotation mate Tim Lincecum's thirty-six.[85][86][87] According to SportsCenter, this is Bumgarner's tenth career double-digit strikeout game with no walks, extending his all-time franchise record. Since 2010, his ten double-digit strikeout games with no walks are the second most in the Majors in that span, which trail only Clayton Kershaw.

On September 20 at Dodger Stadium, Bumgarner struck out ten Los Angeles Dodgers batters and walked nobody, extending his franchise record and in the process struck out his two-hundredth and thirty-fifth batter of the season, which broke his own San Francisco Giants single-season strikeout record by a left-handed pitcher for the third consecutive year.[88] In addition to striking out his 240th batter of the season, he broke a Giants all-time franchise record for strikeouts in a single season by a left-handed pitcher that lasted 118 years. The former record holder Cy Seymour struck out 239 batters in 1898, leading the National League for the second consecutive year, and Bumgarner finished the night with 241 for the season, according to Baseball-Reference.com.[89] However, CSN Bay Area indicates Seymour struck-out 244 batters. In his next start on September 24 at Petco Park against the San Diego Padres, by striking out Jon Jay for his 245th batter of the season, Bumgarner broke the previous record. He also registered his ninth career multi-hit game, including a career-high two doubles.

On September 30 at AT&T Park, in a 9-3 win over the Los Angeles Dodgers, Bumgarner won his one hundredth career game, becoming the twenty-fourth pitcher in franchise history to reach the mark. At age 27 years and 60 days, he became the third youngest pitcher in franchise history, the youngest left-handed pitcher, and the youngest in the San Francisco Era to reach the milestone. He broke Juan Marichal's San Francisco milestone when Marichal was 27 years, 288 days old in 1965. Only Hal Schumacher (24 years and 234 days in 1938) and Christy Mathewson (24 years and 262 days in 1905) were younger. He became the seventh pitcher in the San Francisco Era to reach the milestone and the third Giant to win his one hundredth career game on the 2016 season, joining fellow rotation mates Johnny Cueto and Matt Cain.[90][91][92][93][94] Since 2005, Bumgarner is one of three starting pitchers in the starting rotation, along with Tim Lincecum and Matt Cain, to win over one hundred games. In that span, the San Francisco Giants are the only Major League team to accomplish the feat, according to NBC Sports Bay Area. Bumgarner finished in fourth place for the National League Cy Young Award voting by the Baseball Writers' Association of America, behind Max Scherzer, Jon Lester, and Kyle Hendricks. He finished sixteenth in the National League Most Valuable Player Award voting and was second among pitchers in voting.

On October 5 at Citi Field, in a 3-0 win over the defending National League Champion New York Mets in the NL Wild Card Game, Bumgarner pitched his third career postseason complete game four-hit shutout to give him the most career complete game shutouts in the history of the Wild Card Era with two. In other words, he set the Major League record for most career complete game shutout wins in winner-take-all-games, the first and only pitcher to have more than one. Bumgarner's third career postseason shutout ties him for second all-time behind Christy Mathewson's four. He also tied Tom Glavine's Major League record with six career scoreless postseason starts and lowered his Major League career postseason road record to a microscopic 0.50 ERA.[95]

2017

On April 2 at Chase Field, against the Arizona Diamondbacks, Bumgarner made his fourth consecutive Opening Day start, joining Juan Marichal and Tim Lincecum as the only three pitchers to make at least four consecutive Opening Day starts in the San Francisco Era and the first left-handed pitcher to do so. In the top of the fifth, Bumgarner hit his second career home run off of Zack Greinke, which was the first home run by a National League player in the 2017 season and also tied Hal Schumacher's franchise record for career home runs hit by a pitcher. He became the fourth Giants pitcher and the first in the San Francisco Era to hit a home run on Opening Day, joining Mickey Welch (May 1, 1884), Larry Benton (April 18, 1929), and Johnny Antonelli (April 17, 1956). According to SportsCenter, with his home run off of Greinke, Bumgarner joined Carlos González and Joey Votto as the third player and the first pitcher to hit multiple home runs off of both Clayton Kershaw and Zack Greinke. The ball had an exit velocity of 112.5 miles per hour, the hardest hit by a pitcher in the Statcast Era.[96] After throwing five and a third perfect innings to start the ballgame, he hit another home run, surpassing Hal Schumacher to become the franchise career home run leader by a pitcher. His first career multi-home run game made him the first pitcher in Major League history to hit at least two home runs on Opening Day.[97] He became the fifth most recent Giant to hit two or more home runs on Opening Day, joining Bob Elliott in 1952, Willie Mays in 1964, Matt Williams in 1994, and Barry Bonds in 2002, according to NBC Sports Bay Area.

On April 20th, Bumgarner injured his throwing shoulder while riding a dirt bike in Colorado during a scheduled off-day. The Grade 2 sprain took over two months to heal and Bumgarner did not pitch again in MLB until July 15th, the Giants' second game after the All-Star Break. He had been 0-3 with a 3.00 ERA in 28 innings pitched before the accident and he went 4-6 with a 3.38 ERA in 84 innings after returning from the DL.[98]

According to SportsCenter on August 23, with a minimum of forty starts, Bumgarner's 2.77 earned run average is the fifth best in the Majors since September 1, 2015.

On September 22 at Dodger Stadium, in a 2-1 win over the Los Angeles Dodgers, Bumgarner won his 104th career game, which tied Mike McCormick for second place among left-handed pitchers on the Giants all-time career win list in the San Francisco Era.[99] According to NBC Sports Bay Area, he also tied McCormick and rotation mate Matt Cain for fifth place in the San Francisco Era.

On November 6, the Giants exercised Bumgarner's 2018 contract option worth $12 million.[100]

2018

Bumgarner began the 2018 season on the 10-day disable list after suffering a fractured pinky in his final start of spring training. He was eventually transferred to the 60-day disable list once it was apparent the injury was going to take longer to heal. He returned to action and made his 2018 debut on June 5 against Arizona.[101]

On June 21 at AT&T Park, in a 3-0 win over the San Diego Padres, Bumgarner won his 105th career game, surpassing recently retired rotation mate Matt Cain and tying Kirk Reuter for fourth place as well as for the most wins among left-handed pitchers in the San Francisco Era.[102][103]

On June 27 at AT&T Park, in a 1-0 walk-off win over the Colorado Rockies, in the top of the first inning, Bumgarner struck out leadoff hitter DJ LeMahieu for his fifteen-hundredth career strikeout. He is the fourth fastest left-handed pitcher in his 239th career game and the ninth fastest left-handed pitcher in innings pitched in the live-ball era since 1920 to reach the milestone. Only Randy Johnson (206), Clayton Kershaw (218), David Price (236) reached the milestone in fewer games pitched.[104][105]

On July 2 at Coors Field against the Colorado Rockies, Bumgarner's scoreless inning streak ended but set a new regular season career-high at twenty-two.[106]

On July 8 at AT&T Park, in a 13-8 win over the St. Louis Cardinals, Bumgarner won his 106th career game, surpassing Kirk Reuter for sole possession of fourth place and first overall for the most wins by a left-handed pitcher in the San Francisco Era, according to Baseball-Reference.com.

On July 20 at Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum, Bumgarner pitched four innings against the Oakland Athletics, ending his streak of eighty-seven consecutive starts in which he pitched at least five innings, which was the longest active streak in the Majors. Gerrit Cole was second in that category with forty-one.[107]

On August 23 at Citi Field, in an 3-1 win over the New York Mets, Bumgarner won his 109th career game, surpassing former rotation mate Tim Lincecum for sole possession of third place in the San Francisco Era and the most wins by a pitcher under Bruce Bochy's managerial career.[108]

On September 25 at AT&T Park, in a 5-4 win over the San Diego Padres, Bumgarner registered a pinch-hit walk-off RBI single to left field, knocking in Gorkys Hernández from third base in the bottom of the twelfth inning. It was Bumgarner's first career walk-off hit and the first by a Giants pitcher in twenty-eight years. Don Robinson was the last Giants pitcher to do so in 1990.[109][110]

On October 29, the Giants exercised Bumgarner's 2019 contract option worth $12 million.[111]

2019

On March 28 at Petco Park, against the San Diego Padres, Bumgarner made his fifth career Opening Day start, joining Juan Marichal as the only other pitcher to make at least five career Opening Day starts in the San Francisco Era and the first left-handed pitcher to do so. Bumgarner struck out nine batters on the afternoon and his ninth strikeout of the day was his 1,600th career strikeout, joining Carl Hubbell as the only left-handed pitchers in franchise history to reach the milestone and the first in the San Francisco Era. He became the fifth pitcher in the San Francisco Era and the eighth pitcher in franchise history overall to reach the milestone.[112]

On April 2, Bumgarner struck out his 200th career Dodger and hit his eighteenth career home run, tying Cy Young for fifteenth on the all-time list for home runs by pitchers.[113]

On April 8 at Oracle Park, by striking out the San Diego Padres' Luis Urías for career strikeout number 1,607, Bumgarner surpassed Gaylord Perry to move into fourth place in the San Francisco Era and seventh place in franchise history for career strikeouts.[114]

On April 13 at Oracle Park, in a 5-2 win over the Colorado Rockies, Bumgarner pitched seven innings and won his 111th career game, surpassing former rotation mate Tim Lincecum on the all-time MLB wins list. According to NBC Sports Bay Area during the game, Bumgarner's career win-loss record is 99-19 when he receives three or more runs of support and 11-66 when he receives two or less runs of support.

Pitching style

Bumgarner's repertoire consists of four pitches including a curveball he throws at two different speeds with two different types of movement. He features a four-seam fastball in the 90 to 93 miles per hour (145 to 150 km/h) range that tops off at 95 mph, a cutter around 86 to 90 miles per hour (138 to 145 km/h), a curveball that usually ranges from 75 to 78 miles per hour (121 to 126 km/h) with sharp, mostly downward break, but he occasionally throws a much slower curve with a more exaggerated and horizontal break in the mid-to-high 60 miles per hour range, and a change-up that sits at 82 to 85 miles per hour (132 to 137 km/h). The fastball and cutter are his main pitches; through 2013, he has thrown the fastball 43.68% of the time and the cutter 33.84% of the time.[115]

Bumgarner has a unique pitching style; as he throws, it appears he is throwing toward first base.

Career highlights

On December 8, 2014, Sports Illustrated named Madison Bumgarner Sportsman of the Year.[53]

On December 31, 2014, the Associated Press named Madison Bumgarner the Male Athlete of the Year regarding his 2014 postseason performance and overall success as an MLB left-handed pitcher.[55]

Bumgarner has hit 18 career home runs as a pitcher, which is the most hit by any active pitcher, and the second most hit by a pitcher (behind Carlos Zambrano) since the American League adopted the designated hitter rule in 1973.[116][117]

Awards

Award / Honor Time(s) Date(s) Ref(s)
Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year 1 2014 [55]
Babe Ruth Award 1 2014
Major League Baseball World Series champion 3 2010, 2012, 2014
Major League Baseball World Series Most Valuable Player Award 1 2014 [118]
National League All-Star 4 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 [119]
National League Championship Series Most Valuable Player Award 1 2014 [120]
National League Pitcher of the Month Award 2 May & August 2014
National League Silver Slugger Award at pitcher 2 2014, 2015 [121]
Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year 1 2014 [53][54]
Willie Mac Award 1 2014 [122]

Personal life

Bumgarner's parents are Kevin and Debbie, who divorced when Madison was in high school. His father, Kevin, built the log house the younger Bumgarner grew up in, and works nights at a food distribution company.[4] His mother is an accountant for PepsiCo.[10] Bumgarner has a stepsister and two older half-brothers.[10][123][124] Bumgarner had a half-sister, Dena, who died in 2010 after accidentally overdosing on pain medication following hospitalization[125] from cancer.[4]

Bumgarner married Ali Saunders on February 14, 2010, in a private ceremony in which he wore jeans. During the offseason, they live on a farm in North Carolina that is about thirty minutes from where he grew up in the old furniture manufacturing area of the state, and during the season in a condo in San Francisco.[4][126] Bumgarner has been a Baptist since his childhood.[4][127] Andrew Baggarly, a reporter who covers the Giants, wrote of Bumgarner, "While I wouldn't describe him as outgoing, he struck me as being smart, well spoken and polite. He is deeply Christian and seems to be very grounded."[10]

Bumgarner has an endorsement deal with Carhartt, and is featured in one of their television commercials.[128] He also has an endorsement deal with Ford.[129]

See also

Baseball records

Regular season

  • MLB record for grand slams by a pitcher in one season – 2 (tied with Tony Cloninger) [130]
  • MLB record for career grand slams by a pitcher – 2 (tied with 6 others) [131]
  • Along with Buster Posey, the only starting pitcher-catcher duo in MLB history to both hit a grand slam in one game [132]
  • First left-handed pitcher in the live-ball era to hit five home runs and strikeout two hundred batters in a single season [72]
  • First MLB pitcher to hit two home runs on opening day
  • Giants franchise record for home runs hit by a pitcher - 18 (as of 04/11/2019)

Post-season

  • MLB record for most starts in a single post-season – 6 in 2014 (tied for the record with Chris Carpenter, 2011 and Curt Schilling, 2001) [133]
  • MLB record for most innings pitched in a single post-season – ​52 23 in 2014 [134]
  • MLB record for lowest career World Series ERA (minimum 20 innings of work) – 0.25 [134][135]
  • MLB record for fewest hits allowed in a single World Series by any pitcher with at least 20 innings of work – 9 in 21 innings in 2014 [134]
  • MLB record for most shutout innings in relief in a World Series game 7 – 5 (tie with Joe Page) [134]
  • MLB record for longest save in a World Series – 5 innings in Game 7 in 2014 [134]
  • MLB record for longest save in a winner-take-all game – 5 innings in Game 7 in 2014 [134]
  • MLB record for most World Series games won through age 25 – 4 [134]
  • MLB record for most post-season starts of at least 7 shutout innings - 6 [136]
  • First MLB pitcher in a single World Series to earn at least two wins, throw a shutout and earn a save – in 2014 [134]
  • First MLB pitcher in a World Series to pitch a shutout with no walks and at least eight strikeouts – game 5 in 2014 [134]

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Further reading

  • Baggarly, Andrew. A Band of Misfits: Tales of the 2010 San Francisco Giants. Chicago: Triumph Books. ISBN 978-1-60078-598-6.

External links

2009 San Francisco Giants season

The 2009 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 127th year in Major League Baseball, their 52nd year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 10th at AT&T Park. After four consecutive losing seasons, the team finished in third place in the National League West with an 88-74 record, 7 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers. Following Peter Magowan's retirement, Bill Neukom served as general managing partner of the Giants. After a season with the fewest home runs of any team since the 1993 Florida Marlins, general manager Brian Sabean said the Giants would attempt to bring in a power hitter as well as strengthening a bullpen that held a 4.45 ERA in 2008, fourteenth in the National League.After leading the National League Wild Card race for most of the season, the Giants were ultimately passed by the Colorado Rockies. The team finished third in the NL West and second in the Wild Card. Though they missed the playoffs, the Giants surpassed most expectations for their season; for example, Sports Illustrated projected that the Giants would finish with a record of 77–85. Sports Illustrated's Lee Jenkins noted San Francisco's promising farm system (including products Pablo Sandoval and Madison Bumgarner) and the perceived weakness of the NL West as reasons to be optimistic about the Giants' potential. Additionally, the Giants' starting rotation boasted three Cy Young Award winners: Randy Johnson, Tim Lincecum, and Barry Zito. After the season ended, Lincecum won his second straight Cy Young. The Giants would build on their surprising 2009 season the following year, winning the World Series. It would be their first in San Francisco.

2013 San Francisco Giants season

The 2013 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 131st year in Major League Baseball, their fifty-sixth year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their fourteenth at AT&T Park. They entered the season as the defending World Series Champions.

2014 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 2014 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 85th edition of the Major League Baseball All-Star Game, held at Target Field in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the home of the Minnesota Twins. This was the third All-Star Game played in the Twin Cities; Metropolitan Stadium hosted the game in 1965, while the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome hosted the game in 1985. It was televised in the United States on Fox as part of a new eight-year deal. In preparation for the game the Twin Cities' transit company, MetroTransit, completed the new METRO Green Line light-rail between downtown Minneapolis and downtown Saint Paul, and began service on June 14, 2014.

2014 National League Championship Series

The 2014 National League Championship Series was a best-of-seven playoff pitting the St. Louis Cardinals against the San Francisco Giants for the National League pennant and the right to play in the 2014 World Series. The series was the 45th in league history with Fox airing Game 1 and Fox Sports 1 airing Games 2–5 in the United States. Game 1 was simulcast on Fox Sports 1 and was hosted by Kevin Burkhardt, Gabe Kapler and C.J. Nitkowski, who offered sabermetric analysis of the game.To reach the 2014 NLCS, the Cardinals (Central Division champions, 90–72) defeated the Dodgers (West Division champions, 94–68) in the NLDS, 3 games to 1. The Giants (Wild Card, 88–74) defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates in the NL Wild Card Game and then defeated the Nationals (East Division champions, 96–66) in the NLDS, 3 games to 1.This was the fourth time the two teams have met in the postseason (1987 NLCS, 2002 NLCS, and 2012 NLCS). The Cardinals, by virtue of being a division winner, had the home field advantage. The Giants clinched their third pennant within a five-year span, with NLCS wins in 2010 and 2012.

The Giants would go on to defeat the Kansas City Royals in the World Series in seven games, winning their third World Series championship in five years.

2014 National League Wild Card Game

The 2014 National League Wild Card Game was a play-in game during Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2014 postseason played between the National League's (NL) two wild card teams, the San Francisco Giants and the Pittsburgh Pirates. It was held at PNC Park in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on October 1, 2014, starting at 8:07 p.m. EDT. After both teams finished the regular season with identical records of 88–74, the Pirates were awarded home field for the game, as they won the season series against the Giants, four games to two. Despite this advantage, the Giants won by a score of 8–0 and advanced to play the Washington Nationals in the NL Division Series. In addition to being the third NL Wild Card Game played, it is notable for the first postseason grand slam hit by a shortstop. The game was televised on ESPN, and was also broadcast on ESPN Radio.

2014 San Francisco Giants season

The 2014 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 132nd year in Major League Baseball, their 57th year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 15th at AT&T Park. The Giants finished the season in second place in the National League West, but qualified for the playoffs and defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates in the National League Wild Card Game and the Washington Nationals in the National League Division Series. They defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League Championship Series in five games and beat the Kansas City Royals in seven games in the 2014 World Series, their third World Series win in five years.

2014 World Series

The 2014 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2014 season. The 110th edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the National League (NL) champion San Francisco Giants and the American League (AL) champion Kansas City Royals. The series was played between October 21 to 29. The Giants defeated the Royals four games to three to clinch their third World Series championship in a five-season span (2010–14), and their third overall since the club's move to San Francisco from New York. It was the Giants' eighth World Series championship in franchise history.

The Giants won Game 1 behind a strong pitching performance by Madison Bumgarner while the Royals won Games 2 and 3 as their pitchers limited San Francisco to 2 runs per game. The Giants won Games 4 and 5, thanks to 11 runs in Game 4 and Bumgarner's complete game shutout in Game 5. Kansas City tied the series in Game 6, shutting out San Francisco and scoring 10 runs, which forced a Game 7. The Giants won the final game, 3–2, thanks to timely hitting, including the game-winning RBI by Michael Morse to score Pablo Sandoval. Bumgarner pitched five shutout innings in relief on two days' rest to clinch the championship, claiming the series MVP award.

2016 National League Wild Card Game

The 2016 National League Wild Card Game was a play-in game during Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2016 postseason played between the National League's (NL) two wild card teams, the New York Mets and the San Francisco Giants. As both teams finished with identical 87–75 records, a tiebreaker was used to determine the host team. In accordance with MLB tiebreaking rules, the Mets earned the right to host the game by winning their season series against the Giants 4–3.

The game was played on October 5, 2016 at Citi Field in Queens, New York, and the winner advanced to play the first-seeded Chicago Cubs in the NL Division Series. It was televised in the United States on ESPN.

The Giants defeated the Mets, 3–0.

2016 San Francisco Giants season

The 2016 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 134th year in Major League Baseball, their 59th year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 17th at AT&T Park. They advanced to the postseason as the second National League Wild Card, and defeated the New York Mets in the Wild Card Game. They were defeated in four games by the eventual World Series champion Chicago Cubs in the Division Series.

2017 San Francisco Giants season

The 2017 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 135th year in Major League Baseball, their 60th year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 18th at AT&T Park. They finished 64–98, last place in the NL West and the NL, their worst record in 32 years.

Associated Press Athlete of the Year

The first Athlete of the Year award in the United States was initiated by the Associated Press (AP) in 1931. At a time when women in sports were not given the same recognition as men, the AP offered a male and a female athlete of the year award to either a professional or amateur athlete. The awards are voted on annually by a panel of AP sports editors from across the United States. A large majority of the winners have been Americans. However, non-Americans are also eligible for the honor, and have won on a few occasions.

Baumgartner

Baumgartner (also Baumgärtner, Baumgardner, Bumgardner, Bumgartner or Bumgarner) is a surname of German origin, literally meaning “Tree Gardener”. It may refer to:

Baumgartner surnameAnn Baumgartner, (1918–2008), first American female jet pilot

Beate Baumgartner (born 1983), Austrian-Namibian singer

Brian Baumgartner, (born 1972), American actor

Bruce Baumgartner (born 1960), American amateur wrestler

Felix Baumgartner (born 1969), Austrian skydiver and base jumper

Karl Baumgartner (1949–2014), German film producer

Harold Baumgartner (1883–1938), South African cricketer

James Earl Baumgartner (1943–2011), American mathematician

Johann Wolfgang Baumgartner (1702–1761), German painter

Joseph Baumgartner, Bavarian politician

Ken Baumgartner (born 1966), Canadian ice hockey player

Michael Baumgartner (born 1975), American politician

Nolan Baumgartner (born 1976), Canadian hockey player in the NHL

Paul Baumgartner (1903–1976), Swiss pianist

Peter Baumgartner (businessman), Swiss businessman

Rudolf Baumgartner (1917–2002), Swiss conductor and violinist

Stan Baumgartner (1894–1955), American baseball player

Steve Baumgartner (born 1951), American football player

Tanja Ariane Baumgartner (born 19??), German mezzo-soprano

Thomas Baumgartner (born c. 1945), American economist

Zsolt Baumgartner (born 1981), Hungarian race driverBaumgardner surnameJennifer Baumgardner (born 1970), American feminist and author

John Baumgardner, American intelligent design proponent

Randy Baumgardner (born 1956), American politicianBumgardner surnameMax Bumgardner (1923–2005), former NFL defensive back

Rex Bumgardner (1923–1998), former NFL running backBumgarner surnameA. L. Bumgarner, NASCAR cup series owner from the 1950s

Constance Bumgarner Gee, an American scholar, memoirist, and advocate of the medical use of cannabis

James Garner (1928-2014; born James Scott Bumgarner), an American actor, producer, and voice artist

Madison Bumgarner (born 1989), pitcher for the San Francisco Giants

Michael Bumgarner (born 1959), United States Army military police officer

Michele Bumgarner (born 1989), Filipina racing driver

Samantha Bumgarner (1878–1960), country and folk music performer

Dick Tidrow

Richard William Tidrow (born May 14, 1947) is a former Major League Baseball player for the Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees, Chicago Cubs, Chicago White Sox, and New York Mets from 1972 to 1984. He was primarily known as a setup man, or pitcher before the closer; however, on occasion he would also start games. His best seasons were with the Yankees when he helped the team to two World Series championships in 1977 and 1978, beating the Los Angeles Dodgers twice in a row. He was traded the following season to the Cubs for Ray Burris.

He acquired his nickname, "Dirt", while playing for the Yankees, for his somewhat unkempt appearance and his tendency to get his uniform shirt dirty even before the start of a game. His high kick and sidearm delivery anticipated the style of Dennis Eckersley.

He is currently the scouting director for the San Francisco Giants, overseeing a farm system that has produced several top pitching talents, including Matt Cain, Tim Lincecum, and Madison Bumgarner.

List of Major League Baseball all-time leaders in home runs by pitchers

In baseball, a home run (HR) is typically a fair hit that passes over an outfield fence or into the stands at a distance from home base of 250 feet or more, which entitles the batter to legally touch all bases and score without liability. Atypically, a batter who hits a fair ball and touches each base in succession from 1st to home, without an error being charged to a defensive player, is credited with an inside-the-park home run. If, during a play, defensive or fan interference is called, and the awarded bases allow the batter to cross home plate, the batter is credited with a home run.Wes Ferrell holds the all-time Major League Baseball record for home runs hit while playing the position of pitcher. He hit 37 as a pitcher. Baseball Hall of Famers Bob Lemon and Warren Spahn are tied for second with 35 career home runs apiece. Red Ruffing, Earl Wilson, and Don Drysdale are the only other pitchers to hit at least 25 home runs. Jack Stivetts hit a total of 35 home runs in his playing career, 21 as a pitcher.As of the 2019 season, Madison Bumgarner, with 18 home runs, holds the lead among all active pitchers. Bumgarner also has hit the second most home runs by a pitcher since the American League adopted the designated hitter rule in 1973 (behind Carlos Zambrano). Bumgarner has played his whole career thus far for the San Francisco Giants of the National League.

Ferrell also holds the single-season record for home runs by a pitcher, with nine, a mark that he reached in 1931. The record had previously been held by Stivetts, who had hit seven in 1890. Since 1931, six different pitchers have hit seven home runs in a season: Ferrell, Lemon, Don Newcombe, Don Drysdale (twice), Wilson, and Mike Hampton.Babe Ruth started his major league career as a pitcher before moving to the outfield. Only 14 of his 714 career home runs were hit as a pitcher, however. The first pitcher to officially hit a home run was Jack Manning, who accomplished the feat on August 3, 1876. The most home runs by a pitcher in a single game is three, achieved by Jim Tobin on May 13, 1942.

List of San Francisco Giants Opening Day starting pitchers

The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball franchise based in San Francisco, California. They moved to San Francisco from New York City in 1958. They play in the National League West division. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. Through 2016, the Giants have used 30 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 58 seasons since moving to San Francisco. The 30 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 27 wins, 16 losses and 16 no decisions. No decisions are only awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game.The first Opening Day game for the San Francisco Giants was played against the Los Angeles Dodgers on April 15, 1958 at Seals Stadium, the Giants' first home ball park in San Francisco. Rubén Gómez was the Giants' Opening Day starting pitcher that day, in a game the Giants lost 8–0. That was the Giants' only Opening Day game at Seals Stadium. They also played in two other home parks in San Francisco: Candlestick Park from 1960 to 1999, and AT&T Park, previously called PacBell Park and SBC Park, since 2000. The Giants' Opening Day starting pitchers had a record of seven wins, three losses and seven no decisions at Candlestick Park and have a record of two wins, one loss and one no decision at AT&T Park. That gives the San Francisco Giants' Opening Day starting pitchers a total home record of 10 wins, 4 losses and 8 no decisions. Their record in Opening Day road games is 17 wins, 12 losses, and 8 no decisions.Juan Marichal holds the San Francisco Giants' record for most Opening Day starts, with 10. Marichal had a record in Opening Day starts of six wins, two losses and two no decisions. Tim Lincecum and Madison Bumgarner each made four Opening Day starts for the Giants, and John Montefusco, Mike Krukow, John Burkett and Liván Hernández each made three Opening Day starts. Sam Jones, Vida Blue, Rick Reuschel, Mark Gardner, Kirk Rueter, Jason Schmidt and Barry Zito have each made two Opening Day starts for the Giants. Marichal has the most wins in Opening Day starts for San Francisco, with six. Reuschel and Burkett are the only pitchers to have won more than one Opening Day start for San Francisco without a loss. Both have records in Opening Day starts of two wins and no losses. Burkett also has a no decision. Zito has the worst record for San Francisco in Opening Day starts, with no wins and two losses. Zito and Marichal have the most losses in Opening Day starts, with two apiece. The Giants have played in the World Series six times since moving to San Francisco, in 1962, 1989, 2002, 2010, 2012 and 2014, winning in 2010, 2012 and 2014. Their Opening Day starting pitchers in those years were Juan Marichal in 1962, Rick Reuschel in 1989, Liván Hernández in 2002, Tim Lincecum in 2010 and 2012, and Madison Bumgarner in 2014. The Giants' Opening Day starting pitchers won four of their six Opening Day starts in those seasons, with their only loss coming in 2012 and a no decision in 2014.

List of San Francisco Giants first-round draft picks

The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in San Francisco, California. They play in the National League West division. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is MLB's primary mechanism for assigning players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur clubs to its franchises. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, with the team possessing the worst record receiving the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks. Since the establishment of the draft in 1965, the Giants have selected 68 players in the first round.Of those 68 players, 32 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 23 of these were right-handed, while 9 were left-handed. The Giants have also selected twelve outfielders, seven shortstops, six catchers, four third basemen, and three players each at first and second base. One player, 2010 selection Gary Brown, was drafted as a center fielder. The franchise has drafted eight players from colleges or high schools in their home state of California, more than any other. The Giants have never held the first-overall pick, but they did have the second pick in 1985, with which they drafted Will Clark.Four of San Francisco's first-round draft picks have won three World Series championships with the team—Matt Cain, Tim Lincecum, Madison Bumgarner, and Buster Posey—all as part of the 2010, 2012 and 2014 championship teams. Two of the Giants' selections have won the National League Rookie of the Year Award: Gary Matthews (drafted in 1968) won in 1973; and Posey (drafted in 2008) won the award in 2010. Posey was also named the National League's Most Valuable Player in 2012. Three of the Giants selections have been named the Most Valuable Player of the National League Championship Series; Matthews in 1983 with Philadelphia, Clark in 1989 and Bumgarner in 2014. Bumgarner was also named Most Valuable Player of the 2014 World Series. Lincecum, the Giants' 2006 selection, won the Cy Young Award—awarded annually to the best pitcher in each league—in 2008 and 2009.San Francisco has made 16 selections in the supplemental round of the draft. They have also received 12 compensatory picks since the first draft in 1965. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the previous off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year. The Giants have failed to sign two of their first-round selections: 1979 pick Rick Luecken; and 1996 pick Matt White. The Giants did not receive any compensation for Luecken, but they did receive the 49th pick in 1997 for failing to sign White.

List of San Francisco Giants team records

The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in San Francisco, California. The Giants formed in 1883 as the New York Gothams. The club was renamed to the New York Giants in 1885. 75 years later, the franchise moved to its current day city, San Francisco. Through the 2017 season, the Giants have played 20,528 games, winning 11,015, and losing 9,513 for a winning percentage of approximately .537. This list documents the superlative records and accomplishments of team members during their tenures as Gothams or Giants.

List of Silver Slugger Award winners at pitcher

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball (MLB). These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.Only National League pitchers receive a Silver Slugger Award; lineups in the American League include the designated hitter, who replaces the pitcher in the batting order, so the designated hitter receives the award instead. Mike Hampton has won the most Silver Sluggers as a pitcher, earning five consecutive awards with four different teams from 1999 to 2003. Tom Glavine is a four-time winner (1991, 1995–1996, 1998) with the Atlanta Braves. Rick Rhoden (1984–1986), Don Robinson (1982, 1989–1990), and Carlos Zambrano (2006, 2008–2009) each own three Silver Sluggers. Two-time winners include the inaugural winner, Bob Forsch (1980, 1987),, Fernando Valenzuela (1981, 1983), who won the Cy Young Award, the Rookie of the Year Award, and the Silver Slugger in his first full major league season., and Madison Bumgarner (2014–2015). The most recent winner is Germán Márquez.

Hampton has hit the most home runs in a pitcher's Silver Slugger-winning season, with seven in 2001. He is tied with Robinson as the leader in runs batted in, with 16 (Hampton, 2001; Robinson, 1982). Zack Greinke leads all Silver Slugger-winning pitchers in on-base percentage with a .409 clip set in 2013. Orel Hershiser leads winning pitchers in batting average, with the .356 mark he set in 1993. Micah Owings is the slugging percentage leader among winners (.683 in 2007).

McCovey Cove

McCovey Cove is the unofficial name of a section of San Francisco Bay beyond the right field wall of Oracle Park, home of the San Francisco Giants, named after famed Giants first baseman Willie McCovey. The proper name for the cove is China Basin, which is the mouth of Mission Creek as it meets the bay. The cove is bounded along the north by Oracle Park, with a ferry landing and a breakwater at the northeast end. The southern shore is lined by China Basin Park and McCovey Point. To the east, it opens up to San Francisco Bay, while the west end of the cove is bounded by the Lefty O'Doul Bridge, named after San Francisco ballplayer and manager Lefty O'Doul.

San Francisco Giants current roster
Active roster
Inactive roster
Injured list
Coaching Staff

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