Macmillan Publishers

Macmillan Publishers Ltd (occasionally known as the Macmillan Group) is an international publishing company owned by Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. It has offices in 41 countries worldwide and operates in more than thirty others.

Macmillan Publishers
Macmillan Publishers
Parent companyHoltzbrinck Publishing Group
Founded1843
FounderDaniel Macmillan
Alexander Macmillan
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Headquarters locationLondon, England
Publication typesBooks, academic journals, magazines
Official websitemacmillan.com
ASA conference 2008 - 14
2008 conference booth

History

MacMillan and Co logo 1880
This logo appeared in Leslie Stephen's biography of Alexander Pope, published by Macmillan & Co in 1880.

Macmillan was founded in 1843 by Daniel and Alexander Macmillan, two brothers from the Isle of Arran, Scotland. Daniel was the business brain, while Alexander laid the literary foundations, publishing such notable authors as Charles Kingsley (1855), Thomas Hughes (1859), Francis Turner Palgrave (1861), Christina Rossetti (1862), Matthew Arnold (1865) and Lewis Carroll (1865). Alfred Tennyson joined the list in 1884, Thomas Hardy in 1886 and Rudyard Kipling in 1890.[1]

Other major writers published by Macmillan included W. B. Yeats, Rabindranath Tagore, Nirad C. Chaudhuri, Seán O'Casey, John Maynard Keynes, Charles Morgan, Hugh Walpole, Margaret Mitchell, C. P. Snow, Rumer Godden and Ram Sharan Sharma.

Beyond literature, the company created such enduring titles as Nature (1869), the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (1877) and Sir Robert Harry Inglis Palgrave's Dictionary of Political Economy (1894–99).

George Edward Brett opened the first Macmillan office in the United States in 1869 and Macmillan sold its U.S. operations to the Brett family, George Platt Brett, Sr. and George Platt Brett, Jr. in 1896, resulting in the creation of an American company, Macmillan Publishing, also called the Macmillan Company. Even with the split of the American company from its parent company in England, George Brett, Jr. and Harold Macmillan remained close personal friends. Macmillan Publishers re-entered the American market in 1954 under the name St. Martin's Press.

Macmillan of Canada was founded in 1905; Maclean-Hunter acquired the company in 1973.

After retiring from politics in 1964, former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Harold Macmillan became chairman of the company, serving until his death in December 1986.[2] He had been with the family firm as a junior partner from 1920 to 1940 (when he became a junior minister), and from 1945 to 1951 while he was in the opposition in Parliament.

Holtzbrinck Publishing Group purchased the company in 1999.[3]

Pearson acquired the Macmillan name in America in 1998, following its purchase of the Simon & Schuster educational and professional group (which included various Macmillan properties).[3] Holtzbrinck purchased it from them in 2001.[4] McGraw-Hill continues to market its pre-kindergarten through elementary school titles under its Macmillan/McGraw-Hill brand. The US operations of Holtzbrinck Publishing changed its name to Macmillan in October 2017.[3][5] Its audio publishing imprint changed its name from Audio Renaissance to Macmillan Audio, while its distribution arm was renamed from Von Holtzbrinck Publishers Services to Macmillan Publishers Services.[3] With Pan Macmillan's purchase of Kingfisher, a British children's publisher, Roaring Brook Press publisher Simon Boughton would take oversee Kingfisher's US business in October 2007.[6]

By some estimates, as of 2009 e-books account for three to five per cent of total book sales, and are the fastest growing segment of the market.[7] According to The New York Times, Macmillan and other major publishers "fear that massive discounting [of e-books] by retailers including Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Sony could ultimately devalue what consumers are willing to pay for books." In response, the publisher introduced a new boilerplate contract for its authors that established a royalty of 20 per cent of net proceeds on e-book sales, a rate five per cent lower than most other major publishers.[7] Following the announcement of the Apple iPad on 27 January 2010—a product that comes with access to the iBookstore—Macmillan gave Amazon.com two options: continue to sell e-books based on a price of the retailer's choice (the "wholesale model"), with the e-book edition released several months after the hardcover edition is released, or switch to the agency model introduced to the industry by Apple, in which both are released simultaneously and the price is set by the publisher. In the latter case, Amazon.com would receive a 30 per cent commission.[8] Amazon responded by pulling all Macmillan books, both electronic and physical, from their website (although affiliates selling the books were still listed). On 31 January 2010, Amazon chose the agency model preferred by Macmillan.[9] In April 2012, the United States Department of Justice filed United States v. Apple Inc., naming Apple, Macmillan, and four other major publishers as defendants. The suit alleged that they conspired to fix prices for e-books, and weaken Amazon.com's position in the market, in violation of antitrust law.[10] In December 2013, a federal judge approved a settlement of the antitrust claims, in which Macmillan and the other publishers paid into a fund that provided credits to customers who had overpaid for books due to the price-fixing.[11]

In 2010, Macmillan Education submitted to an investigation on grounds of fraudulent practices.[12] The Macmillan division admitted to bribery in an attempt to secure a contract for an education project in southern Sudan.[12] As a direct result of the investigation, sanctions were applied by the World Bank Group, namely a 6-year debarment (reduced from 8 years due to an early acknowledgment of misconduct by the company) declaring the company ineligible to be awarded Bank-financed contracts.[13]

In December 2011, Bedford, Freeman, and Worth Publishing Group, Macmillan's higher education group, changed its name to Macmillan Higher Education while retaining the Bedford, Freeman, and Worth name for its k–12 educational unit.[5] Also that month, Brian Napack resigned as Macmillan president while staying on for transitional purposes.[14]

In May 2015, London-based Macmillan Science and Education merged with Berlin-based Springer Science+Business Media to form Springer Nature, jointly controlled by Holtzbrinck Publishing Group and BC Partners.[15][16]

Divisions

US publishing divisions with imprints
  • Farrar, Straus and Giroux
    • FSG Originals
    • MCD
    • Picador
    • North Point Press
    • Hill and Wang
  • Henry Holt and Company
  • Macmillan Audio - formerly Audio Renaissance[3]
  • Macmillan Children's Publishing Group
    • Farrar Straus Giroux Books for Young Readers
    • Feiwel and Friends
    • First Second - Graphic novels
    • Henry Holt Books for Young Readers
    • Priddy Books
    • Roaring Brook Press[6]
    • Square Fish
    • Imprint[17]
    • Swoon Reads
  • St. Martin's Press
  • Tor/Forge
    • Forge
    • Orb
    • Starscape
    • Tor Books
    • Tor Teen
    • Tor Classics
Other US divisions
  • Macmillan Publishers Services, formerly Von Holtzbrinck Publishers Services, distribution unit[3]

See also

Notes and references

  1. ^ "About Pan Macmillan". Pan Macmillan UK. Retrieved 2016-09-30.
  2. ^ "Harold Macmillan (1894 - 1986)". BBC.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Milliot, Jim (October 9, 2007). "Holtzbrinck's U.S. Arm Now Macmillan". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved October 17, 2018.
  4. ^ Bookseller, Allbusiness.com
  5. ^ a b "News Briefs: Macmillan Rebrands Higher Education Division". Publishers Weekly. December 30, 2011. Retrieved October 17, 2018.
  6. ^ a b "News Briefs: Macmillan Buys Kingfisher". PublishersWeekly.com. October 5, 2007. Retrieved October 17, 2018.
  7. ^ a b Rich, Motoko (28 October 2009). "Macmillan Lowers E-Book Payments for Authors". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-02-11.
  8. ^ Motoko Rich and Brad Stone (31 January 2010). "Publisher Wins Fight With Amazon Over E-Books". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-02-11.
  9. ^ The Amazon Kindle team (31 January 2010). "Macmillan E-books". Kindle Community. Amazon.com. Retrieved 2010-02-11.
  10. ^ Mui, Ylan Q. and Hayley Tsukayama (11 April 2012). "Justice Department sues Apple, publishers over e-book prices". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2014-06-01.
  11. ^ Molina, Brett (25 March 2014). "E-book price fixing settlements rolling out". USA Today. Retrieved 2014-06-01.
  12. ^ a b "Macmillan admits to bribery over World Bank Sudan aid deal". Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-03-17.
  13. ^ "The World Bank Group Debars Macmillan Limited for Corruption in World Bank-supported Education Project in Southern Sudan". World Bank. Retrieved 2016-03-17.
  14. ^ "News Briefs: Napack Resigns As Macmillan President". Publishers Weekly. December 30, 2011. Retrieved October 17, 2018.
  15. ^ "Nature publisher to merge with Springer". Times Higher Education. 15 January 2015. Retrieved April 6, 2018.
  16. ^ Caroline Carpenter (May 6, 2015). "Completed merger forms 'Springer Nature'". The Bookseller. Retrieved July 8, 2015.
  17. ^ Elizabeth Foster, Elizabeth (December 12, 2017). "Macmillan scoops up Rainbow Rangers license". Kidscreen. Brunico Communications Ltd. Retrieved March 3, 2018.

Further reading

  • Wikisource Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Macmillan" . Encyclopædia Britannica. 17 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 264.
  • James, Elizabeth, ed. Macmillan: A Publishing Tradition, Palgrave Macmillan, 2002. ISBN 0-333-73517-X
  • Morgan, Charles, The House of Macmillan (1843-1943), Macmillan, 1944.

External links

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43 Years with the Same Bird

43 years with the Same Bird is a 2008 book written by Daily Mirror columnist Brian Reade. It documents his lifelong following of Liverpool F.C..

The book tells the story of Brian's love affair with Liverpool FC along with the relationship he had with his brother and other family members. It also details the start of his journalistic career and explains how he dealt with the joys and tragic events that accompanied being a Liverpool fan in the 80s.

In brief reviews, the Mirror called it a "brilliantly incisive and profoundly entertaining analysis" and Wales on Sunday praised its "wonderful insight, written in a measured yet endearing way." The Liverpool Echo's Paddy Shennan described Reade as one of Britain's "sharpest and funniest writers" and praised Reade's treatment of the Hillsborough disaster.

Bedford/St. Martin's

Bedford/St. Martin's is an American publishing company specializing in humanities college textbooks. Bedford/St. Martin's is part of the Bedford, Freeman, and Worth Publishing group owned by the Macmillan Publishers, which is in turn owned by the Stuttgart-based Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. Its offices are located in Boston and New York. The company was founded in 1981 by Charles Christensen and Joan Feinberg as Bedford Books, an imprint of St. Martin's Press.

Among others works, Bedford/St. Martin's has published The Bedford Handbook and A Writer's Reference by Diana Hacker, Patterns for College Writing, The Bedford Reader, The American Promise, Ways of the World and Writer's Help.

Cinder (novel)

Cinder is the 2012 debut young adult science fiction novel of American author Marissa Meyer, published by Macmillan Publishers through their subsidiary Feiwel & Friends. It is the first book in The Lunar Chronicles and is followed by Scarlet. The story is loosely based on the classic fairytale Cinderella. Cinder was selected as one of IndieBound's Kids' Next List for winter 2012.

Encyclopedia of Mormonism

The Encyclopedia of Mormonism is a semiofficial encyclopedia for topics relevant to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church, see also "Mormon"). The text is available free online.

In the Fourth Year

In the Fourth Year is a collection H.G. Wells assembled in the spring of 1918 from essays he had recently published discussing the problem of establishing lasting peace when World War I ended. It is mostly devoted to plans for the League of Nations and the discussion of post-war politics.

Macmillan Publishers (United States)

Macmillan Publishers USA was the former name of a now mostly defunct American publishing company. Once the American division of the British Macmillan Publishers, remnants of the original American Macmillan are present in McGraw-Hill Education's Macmillan/McGraw-Hill textbooks and Gale's Macmillan Reference USA division. The German publisher Holtzbrinck, which bought Macmillan UK in 1999, purchased most US rights to the name in 2001 and rebranded its American division with it in 2007.

Macquarie Dictionary

The Macquarie Dictionary () is a dictionary of Australian English. It is generally held by universities and the legal profession to be the authoritative source on Australian English. It also pays considerable attention to New Zealand English. Originally it was a publishing project of Jacaranda Press, a Brisbane educational publisher, for which an editorial committee was formed, largely from the Linguistics department of Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. It is now published by Macquarie Dictionary Publishers an imprint of Pan Macmillan Australia Pty Ltd. In October 2007 it moved its editorial office away from Macquarie University to the University of Sydney., and then later to the Pan Macmillan offices in the Sydney central business district.

Neoclassicism (music)

Neoclassicism in music was a twentieth-century trend, particularly current in the interwar period, in which composers sought to return to aesthetic precepts associated with the broadly defined concept of "classicism", namely order, balance, clarity, economy, and emotional restraint. As such, neoclassicism was a reaction against the unrestrained emotionalism and perceived formlessness of late Romanticism, as well as a "call to order" after the experimental ferment of the first two decades of the twentieth century. The neoclassical impulse found its expression in such features as the use of pared-down performing forces, an emphasis on rhythm and on contrapuntal texture, an updated or expanded tonal harmony, and a concentration on absolute music as opposed to Romantic program music.

In form and thematic technique, neoclassical music often drew inspiration from music of the 18th century, though the inspiring canon belonged as frequently to the Baroque and even earlier periods as to the Classical period—for this reason, music which draws inspiration specifically from the Baroque is sometimes termed neo-Baroque music. Neoclassicism had two distinct national lines of development, French (proceeding partly from the influence of Erik Satie and represented by Igor Stravinsky, who was in fact Russian-born) and German (proceeding from the "New Objectivity" of Ferruccio Busoni, who was actually Italian, and represented by Paul Hindemith). Neoclassicism was an aesthetic trend rather than an organized movement; even many composers not usually thought of as "neoclassicists" absorbed elements of the style.

Pan Books

Pan Books is a publishing imprint that first became active in the 1940s and is now part of the British-based Macmillan Publishers, owned by the Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group of Germany.

Pan Books began as an independent publisher, established in 1944 by Alan Bott, previously known for his memoirs of his experiences as a flying ace in the First World War. The Pan Books logo, showing the ancient Greek god Pan playing pan-pipes, was designed by Mervyn Peake.

A few years after it was founded, Pan Books was bought out by a consortium of several publishing houses, including Macmillan, Collins, Heinemann, and, briefly, Hodder & Stoughton. It became wholly owned by Macmillan in 1987.Pan specialised in publishing paperback fiction and, along with Penguin Books, was one of the first popular publishers of this format in the UK. A large number of popular authors saw their works given paperback publication through Pan, including Ian Fleming, whose James Bond series first appeared in paperback in the UK as Pan titles. So too did Leslie Charteris's books about The Saint, Peter O'Donnell's Modesty Blaise, and novels by Georgette Heyer, Neville Shute, John Steinbeck, Josephine Tey and Arthur Upfield. Pan also published paperback editions of works by classic authors such as Jane Austen and Charles Dickens. Another notable title was The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams.

During the 1950s and 1960s Pan Books editions were noted for their colourful covers, which have made many of them collectables, particularly the Fleming and Charteris novels.The Pan imprint continues to publish a broad list of popular fiction and non-fiction. Among its current authors are Ken Follett, Kate Morton, Jeffrey Archer, Peter James, David Baldacci, Joanna Trollope, C.J. Sansom, Scott Turow and Danielle Steel.

Songs of Kabir

Songs of Kabir is a 1915 book consisting of 100 poems of Kabir, the 15th-century Indian poet and mystic, translated to English by Rabindranath Tagore. In this book Kabir has combined the philosophies of Sufism and Hinduism. The book had an introduction by Evelyn Underhill and was published by Macmillan, New York. This book has been translated to Persian and Kurdish by Leila Farjami and Sayed Madeh Piryonesi, respectively.

Symphony

A symphony is an extended musical composition in Western classical music, most often written by composers for orchestra. Although the term has had many meanings from its origins in the ancient Greek era, by the late 18th century the word had taken on the meaning common today: a work usually consisting of multiple distinct sections or movements, often four, with the first movement in sonata form. Symphonies are almost always scored for an orchestra consisting of a string section (violin, viola, cello, and double bass), brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments which altogether number about 30 to 100 musicians. Symphonies are notated in a musical score, which contains all the instrument parts. Orchestral musicians play from parts which contain just the notated music for their own instrument. Some symphonies also contain vocal parts (e.g., Beethoven's Ninth Symphony).

Tales of the South Pacific

Tales of the South Pacific is a Pulitzer Prize-winning collection of sequentially related short stories by James A. Michener about the Pacific campaign in World War II. The stories are based on observations and anecdotes he collected while stationed as a lieutenant commander in the US Navy on the island of Espiritu Santo in the New Hebrides Islands (now known as Vanuatu).

Written in 1946 and published in 1947, the book was adapted in 1949 as the Broadway musical South Pacific and subsequently as two films, released in 1958 and 2001.

The Manticore

The Manticore is the second novel in Robertson Davies' Deptford Trilogy.

Published in 1972 by Macmillan of Canada, it deals with the aftermath of the mysterious death of Percy Boyd "Boy" Staunton retold during a series of conversations between Staunton's son and a Jungian psychoanalyst.The title refers to elements of the subconscious which unfold through the story and are eventually manifested as a fantastic mythical creature: a manticore.The Manticore won the Governor-General's Literary Award in the English language fiction category in 1972.

The Second Jungle Book

The Second Jungle Book is a sequel to The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling. First published in 1895, it features five stories about Mowgli and three unrelated stories, all but one set in India, most of which Kipling wrote while living in Vermont. All of the stories were previously published in magazines in 1894-5, often under different titles. The 1994 film The Jungle Book used it as a source.

The Soul of a Bishop

The Soul of a Bishop is a 1917 novel by H. G. Wells.

The Wild Swans at Coole

The Wild Swans at Coole is the name of two collections of poetry by W. B. Yeats, published in 1917 and 1919.

Thomas Dunne Books

Thomas Dunne Books, an imprint of St. Martin's Press, a division of Macmillan Publishers, publishes popular trade fiction and nonfiction. Established by publisher Thomas Dunne in 1986, Thomas Dunne Books is based out of the Flatiron Building in New York City. "An imprint that scorns snobbery, prizes the quirky and commercial and flourishes through a unique form of high-volume publishing," Thomas Dunne Books produces 25-35 titles each year, covering a range of genres including commercial and literary fiction, mysteries, thrillers, biography, politics, history, sports, and popular science. In its more than 30-year history, Thomas Dunne Books has published numerous New York Times bestsellers including Dan Brown's first novel Digital Fortress, more than 20 books by international sensation Rosamunde Pilcher, a series of Walking Dead novels written by series creator Robert Kirkman, A Street Cat Named Bob by James Bowden, the Meg Langslow mysteries by Donna Andrews, To Try Men's Souls and other historical fiction by former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich and many, many more. Its recent bestsellers include The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump and Two Paths: America Divided or United. Currently, Thomas Dunne Books publishes trade paperbacks through St. Martin's Griffin and Picador (imprint) and mysteries through St. Martin's Minotaur.

W. H. Freeman and Company

W. H. Freeman and Company is an imprint of Macmillan Higher Education, a division of Macmillan Publishers. Macmillan publishes monographs and textbooks for the sciences under the imprint.

Who Do You Think You Are? (book)

Who Do You Think You Are? is a book of short stories by Alice Munro, recipient of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature, published by Macmillan of Canada in 1978. It won the 1978 Governor General's Award for English Fiction, her second win of that prize.

Outside of Canada, the book was published as The Beggar Maid. Under that title, it was also nominated for the Booker Prize in 1980.

The collection of short stories revolves around protagonist Rose. The collection has been labelled by some critics as a novel, as the same characters and similar themes recur throughout the book, but there is no formal cohesiveness in plot. Each story explores an idea, and is not bound by a particular time, place, setting, or narrative voice.

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